Eskett railway station

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Eskett
Location
PlaceEskett
AreaCopeland
Coordinates54°32′00″N 3°28′24″W / 54.5332°N 3.4732°W / 54.5332; -3.4732Coordinates: 54°32′00″N 3°28′24″W / 54.5332°N 3.4732°W / 54.5332; -3.4732
Grid referenceNY047163
Operations
Original companyWhitehaven, Cleator and Egremont Railway
Pre-groupingLNWR & FR Joint Railway
Post-groupingLondon, Midland and Scottish Railway
Platforms1
History
12 February 1864Opened
11 June 1872Closed to passengers, replaced by Yeathouse[1]
1931Closed[2]
Disused railway stations in the United Kingdom
Closed railway stations in Britain
A B C D–F G H–J K–L M–O P–R S T–V W–Z
170433 at Edinburgh Waverley.JPG UK Railways portal
1904 railway junctions around Cleator Moor, Parton, Rowrah & Whitehaven

Eskett railway station was short-lived as a passenger station. it was built by the Whitehaven, Cleator and Egremont Railway to serve the hamlet of Eskett, near Frizington, Cumbria, England.[3][4]

History[edit]

The line was one of the fruits of the rapid industrialisation of West Cumberland in the second half of the nineteenth century.

The station opened to passengers with the line from Moor Row to Rowrah on 12 February 1864.

The section of line through the station suffered subsidence problems so severe that the company built a deviation line to an alignment curving sharply and steeply to the west, including a new passenger station - Yeathouse. When the deviation and new station opened on 11 June 1872 the old alignment was severed north of Eskett station, which was converted to a goods depot. It remained as such until final closure in 1931.

The deviation made the line even more difficult to work for the rest of its existence.[2]


Preceding station   Disused railways   Following station
Winder
Line and station closed
  Whitehaven, Cleator and Egremont Railway   Frizington
Line and station closed

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Butt 2005, p. 92.
  2. ^ a b Suggitt 2008, p. 58.
  3. ^ Smith & Turner 2012, Map 26.
  4. ^ Jowett 2000, Map 36.

Sources[edit]

  • Butt, R. V. J. (1995). The Directory of Railway Stations: details every public and private passenger station, halt, platform and stopping place, past and present (1st ed.). Sparkford: Patrick Stephens Ltd. ISBN 978-1-85260-508-7. OCLC 60251199.
  • Jowett, Alan (March 1989). Jowett's Railway Atlas of Great Britain and Ireland: From Pre-Grouping to the Present Day (1st ed.). Sparkford: Patrick Stephens Ltd. ISBN 978-1-85260-086-0. OCLC 22311137.
  • Smith, Paul; Turner, Keith (2012). Railway Atlas Then and Now. Ian Allan Publishing. ISBN 978 0 7110 3695 6.
  • Suggitt, Gordon (2008). Lost Railways of Cumbria (Railway Series). Newbury: Countryside Books. ISBN 978-1-84674-107-4.

Further reading[edit]

  • British Railways Pre-Grouping Atlas And Gazetteer. Shepperton: Ian Allan Publishing. 1997 [1958]. ISBN 0-7110-0320-3.
  • Bairstow, Martin (1995). Railways In The Lake District. Martin Bairstow. ISBN 1-871944-11-2.
  • Bowtell, Harold D. (1989). Rails through Lakeland: An Illustrated Journey of the Workington-Cockermouth-Keswick-Penrith Railway 1847-1972. Wyre, Lancashire: Silverling Publishing Ltd. ISBN 0-947971-26-2.
  • Joy, David (1983). Lake Counties (Regional History of the Railways of Great Britain). Newton Abbot: David & Charles. ISBN 094653702X.

External links[edit]