Frederick Kingston

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George Frederick Kingston (1889 – 20 November 1950) was a Canadian Anglican bishop in the 20th century.[1]

Education and first bishopric[edit]

Kingston was born in Prescott, Ontario to Richard an Elizabeth Kingston. He was educated at Trinity College, Toronto earning his Bachelor of Arts in 1913, followed by his Master of Arts degree. He obtained his Bachelor of Divinity at University of King's College in Halifax, Nova Scotia and was ordained as a Deacon in 1916 in St. Thomas' Church Belleville, Ontario.[2] In 1917 he was ordained as a priest at All Saints' Church, Halifax.[3]

He was Professor of Philosophy at King's College, Nova Scotia[4] and then Dean of Trinity College[5] until April 25, 1940 when he was ordained to the episcopate as the fifth Bishop of Algoma.[6]

Archbishop and Primate[edit]

Kingston was translated to Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island as bishop in 1944. He subsequently became both Metropolitan (Archbishop of Nova Scotia) and the Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada in 1947.[7] He died in post on 20 November 1950.[8] Following his death a memorial stained glass window was commissioned for St. Luke's Cathedral (Sault Ste. Marie) in memory of his service to the Algoma Diocese.[3]

Personal life[edit]

Kingston married Florence Belle Brown in 1919 and went on to have three children with her. Their one son, Temple Kingston went on to be the Principal of Canterbury College (Windsor, Ontario).[9]

He was an active Freemason, in Craft Freemasonry, Royal Arch Freemasonry, and the Red Cross of Constantine, and served as Grand Chaplain of the Grand Lodge of Canada (Ontario) and Nova Scotia, from 1948 until his death in 1950.[10]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Primates of the Anglican Church of Canada
  2. ^ Crockford's Clerical Directory1947-48 Oxford, OUP, 1947
  3. ^ a b Algoma 100: 1873-1973 A documentary commemorating the centennial of the Diocese of Algoma. Sault Ste Marie, Ontario: Anglican Diocese of Algoma. 1973. p. 81. 
  4. ^ “Who was Who”1897-1990 London, A & C Black, 1991, ISBN 0-7136-3457-X
  5. ^ Anglican Bishops of Canada
  6. ^ "Order of Service, Consecration of George Frederick Kingston" (1940 April 25) [textual record]. Archbishop George Frederick Kingston fonds, Fonds: Archbishop George Frederick Kingston fonds, Box: 001, File: 011, ID: 2009-074-001-011. Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario: Engracia De Jesus Matias Archives and Special Collections, Algoma University. 2009-074.
  7. ^ The Times, 10 September 1947; p3; Issue 50862; col D, "New Anglican Primate in Canada"
  8. ^ "Order of Service, Burial of George Frederick Kingston" (1950 November 23) [textual record]. Archbishop George Frederick Kingston fonds, Fonds: Archbishop George Frederick Kingston fonds, Box: 001, File: 009, ID: 2009-074-001-009. Sault Ste Marie, Ontario: Engracia De Jesus Matias Archives and Special Collections, Algoma University. 2009-074.
  9. ^ "Archbishop George Frederick Kingston fonds". Engracia De Jesus Matias Archives and Special Collections. Algoma University. Retrieved October 11, 2016. 
  10. ^ William R. Denslow (2004). 10,000 Famous Freemasons from K to Z. Kessinger Publishing. pp. 27–. ISBN 978-1-4179-7579-2. 
Anglican Communion titles
Preceded by
Rocksborough Remington Smith
Bishop of Algoma
1940 – 1944
Succeeded by
William Lockridge Wright
Preceded by
John Hackenley
Bishop of Nova Scotia
1944 – 1950
Succeeded by
Robert Harold Waterman
Preceded by
Derwyn Trevor Owen
Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada
1947 – 1950
Succeeded by
Walter Barfoot