Gangapurna

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Gangapurna
Gangapurna Glacier.jpg
Gangapurna in 2011
Highest point
Elevation7,455 m (24,459 ft)
Prominence563 m (1,847 ft) Edit this on Wikidata
Coordinates28°36′18″N 83°57′48″E / 28.60500431196019°N 83.96330632666488°E / 28.60500431196019; 83.96330632666488Coordinates: 28°36′18″N 83°57′48″E / 28.60500431196019°N 83.96330632666488°E / 28.60500431196019; 83.96330632666488
Naming
Native nameगंगापूर्ण  (Nepali)
Geography
Gangapurna is located in Gandaki Province
Gangapurna
Gangapurna
Location in Gandaki Province
Gangapurna is located in Nepal
Gangapurna
Gangapurna
Gangapurna (Nepal)
CountryNepal
ProvinceGandaki Province
DistrictKaski and Manang
Parent rangeAnnapurna
Climbing
First ascent6 May 1965

Gangapurna (Nepali: गंगापूर्ण) is a mountain in Gandaki Province, Nepal. It is part of the Annapurna mountain range in north-central Nepal at an elevation of 7,455 metres (24,459 ft) and with the prominence of 563 metres (1,847 ft). It was first ascended in 1965 by a German expedition via its south face and east ridge. Gangapurna is entirely located in the Annapurna Conservation Area.

Geography[edit]

Gangapurna is located at the border of Annapurna Rural Municipality, Kaski and Nesyang Rural Municipality, Manang in Gandaki Province at 7,455 metres (24,459 ft) above sea level and its prominence is 563 metres (1,847 ft).[1][2] It is part of the Annapurna mountain range in north-central Nepal, and Gangapurna is on the main ridge that connects Annapurna I to Gangapurna and Annapurna III.[3][4] The main peak of the mountain range, Annapurna I Main, is the tenth highest mountain in the world at 8,091 metres (26,545 ft) above sea level.[5]

The mountain is named after Ganga, the Hindu goddess who is a personification of the river Ganges.[6] Gangapurna entirely lies in the Annapurna Conservation Area, Nepal's largest protected area established in 1985,[7] which also encompasses Annapurna Sanctuary and is known for several trekking routes including Annapurna Circuit.[8][9] The glaciers of Gangapurna, Annapurna IV, Khangsar Kang, and Glacier Dom create Gangapurna Lake,[10] and the glaciers of the mountain have been melting extensively due to climate change.[11][12][13] The base camp is located at 4,800 metres (15,700 ft).[14]

Climbing history[edit]

On 6 May 1965, Gangapurna was first climbed by Erich Reismueller, Ang Temba Sherpa, and Phu Dorjee Sherpa during a German expedition via its south face and east ridge.[1][15] The second successful climb was led by Japan's Osaka Gangapurna Expedition in 1974.[16] In 1981, Canadian James Blench and John Lauchlan climbed the mountain using the Alpine style which is considered to be a "remarkable achievement for the era".[17] The next year, six Japanese attempted to climb Gangapurna via its unclimbed northwest ridge, however, they were found buried in an avalanche on 29 September.[18]

In 1988, Gudmundur Petursson led an Icelandic expedition via its east ridge, due to a three-day thunderstorm that added 50 cm of snow to the mountain every day and it posed a threat of an avalanche, they abandoned the expedition after reaching 5,500 metres (18,000 ft).[19] In 1992, Timothy Brill led an American expedition to climb Gangapurna in winter from the south ridge, however, they only got to 5,800 metres (19,000 ft).[20] The same year, there were two unsuccessful expeditions led by Spanish mountaineer Francisco Jose Palacios.[20] In 2017, three Korean climbers climbed Gangapurna using a newly discovered south face route.[17]

Neighbouring peaks[edit]

The Annapurna massif, view from aircraft

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Gangapurna". Nepal Himal Peak Profile. Retrieved 13 December 2021.
  2. ^ "Gangapurna". Peakbagger. Retrieved 13 December 2021.
  3. ^ Gurung, Harka B. (1980). Vignettes of Nepal. Sajha Prakashan. p. 229. Archived from the original on 18 November 2021. Retrieved 5 December 2021.
  4. ^ Shirahata, Shirō (1983). Nepal Himalaya. Heian International. p. 220. ISBN 978-0-89346-220-8.
  5. ^ Western, David; Wright, Michael (19 March 2013). Natural Connections: Perspectives In Community-Based Conservation. Island Press. p. 264. ISBN 978-1-61091-094-1.
  6. ^ Bezruchka, Stephen (1997). Trekking in Nepal: A Traveler's Guide. The Mountaineers Books. p. 186. ISBN 978-0-89886-535-6. Archived from the original on 5 December 2021. Retrieved 5 December 2021.
  7. ^ Singh, R. B.; Prokop, Pawel (13 October 2015). Environmental Geography of South Asia: Contributions Toward a Future Earth Initiative. Springer. p. 274. ISBN 978-4-431-55741-8.
  8. ^ Gurung, Manaslu (2004). Women and Development in the Third World: A Case Study from Ghandruk, Nepal. WWF Nepal Program Office. p. 76.
  9. ^ Western, David; Wright, Michael (19 March 2013). Natural Connections: Perspectives In Community-Based Conservation. Island Press. p. 263. ISBN 978-1-61091-094-1.
  10. ^ Neupane, Tufan (3 September 2020). "Forests replace glaciers in the Himalaya". Nepali Times. Retrieved 13 December 2021.
  11. ^ Rana, Ramji (8 October 2018). "Gangapurna Lake rapidly becoming shallower". The Himalayan Times. Archived from the original on 5 December 2021. Retrieved 5 December 2021.
  12. ^ Huettmann, Falk (26 April 2012). Protection of the Three Poles. Springer Science & Business Media. p. 17. ISBN 978-4-431-54005-2. Archived from the original on 5 December 2021. Retrieved 5 December 2021.
  13. ^ Oestigaard, Terje (2005). Death and Life-giving Waters: Cremation, Caste, and Cosmogony in Karmic Traditions. Archaeopress. p. 158. ISBN 978-1-84171-698-5. Archived from the original on 20 November 2021. Retrieved 5 December 2021.
  14. ^ Club, American Alpine; Carter, H. Adams. 1995 American Alpine Journal. The Mountaineers Books. p. 253. ISBN 978-1-933056-42-5.
  15. ^ Isserman, Maurice; Weaver, Stewart Angas; Molenaar, Dee (1 January 2010). Fallen Giants: A History of Himalayan Mountaineering from the Age of Empire to the Age of Extremes. Yale University Press. p. 521. ISBN 978-0-300-16420-6.
  16. ^ "Gangapurna, 1974". The Himalayan Journal. Retrieved 13 December 2021.
  17. ^ a b "Gangapurna, South Face Direct, Korean Way; Gangapurna West, South Face (Almost to Summit)". AAC Publications. Retrieved 13 December 2021.
  18. ^ Club, American Alpine (2000). American Alpine Journal, 1982. Mountaineers Books. p. 233. ISBN 978-0-930410-15-5.
  19. ^ 1988 American Alpine Journal. The Mountaineers Books. p. 218. ISBN 978-1-933056-35-7.
  20. ^ a b 1992 American Alpine Journal. The Mountaineers Books. pp. 216–217. ISBN 978-1-933056-39-5.

External links[edit]