Gordon Frickers

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Gordon Frickers (born 1949 in Beckenham, Kent, United Kingdom [1]) is a marine artist based in Plymouth, Devon, but also paints in France. Frickers was the first marine artist to be exhibited at the European Parliament in Brussels in May 2011.[2][3]

Education and Experience[edit]

In addition to being an artist, Frickers is also a master shipwright and marine and art historian.[4] At one time he was managing director of Southeast Boat Building.[3]

Awards and Memberships[edit]

Works[edit]

Works and series by Frickers include:

Some of Frickers work has been reproduced as limited edition prints [1]

Patrons[edit]

Frickers patrons and clients include:

Exhibitions and Galleries[edit]

Frickers work has been exhibited at:

Frickers' wine villages of France paintings have been exhibited at Gallerie Marin in Appledore, north Devon.[20]

Books and TV[edit]

Frickers work has appeared in:

  • The Nelson Almanac edited by David Harris [21]
  • Nelson's Ships by Peter Goodwin [9]
  • Ships of Trafalgar by Peter Goodwin [7]
  • Fighting Ships 1750-1850 by Sam Willis [22]

Frickers appeared in the 2010 TV documentary series, The Boats that Built Britain.[23]

External links[edit]

Notes and references[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "Gordon Frickers". The Wivenhoe Encyclopedia. Wivenhoe Town Council. Archived from the original on 27 September 2011. Retrieved 30 June 2011. 
  2. ^ a b "Life on the Ocean Wave". News & Press. British Marine Federation. 14 April 2011. Archived from the original on 30 September 2011. Retrieved 30 June 2011. 
  3. ^ a b c d e van den Berg, Eric (12 April 2011). "Brussels date for Frickers". Lloyd's List. Retrieved 4 July 2011. 
  4. ^ a b c d "Gordon Frickers". Cranston Fine Arts - Artist Listings. Military Print Company. Retrieved 30 June 2011. 
  5. ^ "Gordon Frickers". Member List. British Marine Federation. Retrieved 30 June 2011. 
  6. ^ "Gordon Frickers". Members. Superyacht UK. Archived from the original on 4 July 2011. Retrieved 30 June 2011. 
  7. ^ a b Goodwin, Peter (2005). The Ships of Trafalgar: The British, French and Spanish Fleets, 21 October 1805. London: Conway Maritime. p. 256. ISBN 1-84486-015-9. 
  8. ^ a b Lloyd's List. 19 August 2005. p. 6.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  9. ^ a b Goodwin, Peter (2002). Nelson's Ships: A History of the Vessels in which he Served 1771 - 1805. London: Conway Maritime. p. 192. ISBN 0-85177-742-2. 
  10. ^ The Western Morning News. 14 October 1994.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  11. ^ a b c Monitor (26 April 1994). "People and Places". Lloyd's List. Retrieved 4 July 2011. 
  12. ^ Monitor (11 January 1995). "People and Places". Lloyd's List. Retrieved 4 July 2011. 
  13. ^ a b The Evening Herald. 21 May 1993.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  14. ^ "Gordon Frickers". BI Art Gallery. John Prescott. Retrieved 30 June 2011. 
  15. ^ "Artist gets vote in Brussels". This is Devon. 29 June 2010. Retrieved 2 July 2011. 
  16. ^ The Western Morning News. 2 February 1999.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  17. ^ Calmac press release. 6 February 2001.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  18. ^ a b c "Gordon Frickers Painting Exhibition". Tarn & Aveyron Events. FrenchEntrée. Retrieved 30 June 2011. 
  19. ^ Davis, Barry (15 May 2007). "Long forgotten Israel paintings find new life". Jerusalem Post. p. 24. 
  20. ^ "A colourful view of life in France". The Plymouth Western Morning News. 30 September 2006. Retrieved 30 June 2011. 
  21. ^ The Nelson Almanac: A Book of Days Recording Nelson's Life and the Events That Shaped His Era. London: Conway Maritime Press. 1998. p. 192. ISBN 0-85177-755-4.  |first1= missing |last1= in Authors list (help)
  22. ^ Willis, Sam; introduction by N.A.M. Rodger (2007). Fighting ships, 1750-1850. London: Quercus Publishing. p. 224. ISBN 1-84724-171-9. 
  23. ^ "The Pickle". The Boats That Built Britain (TV series documentary 2010). IMDb. Retrieved 30 June 2011.