HMS Whaddon (L45)

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HMS Whaddon.jpg
Whaddon, 19 June 1942
History
United Kingdom
Name: HMS Whaddon
Ordered: 11 April 1939
Builder: Alexander Stephen & Sons, Linthouse, Govan
Yard number: Admiralty Job No.1472
Laid down: 27 July 1939
Launched: 16 July 1940
Commissioned: 28 February 1941
Identification: pennant number: L45
Honours and
awards:
Fate: Scrapped in April 1959
General characteristics
Class and type: Type I Hunt-class destroyer
Displacement:
  • 1,000 long tons (1,000 t) standard
  • 1,340 long tons (1,360 t) full load
Length: 85 m (278 ft 10 in) o/a
Beam: 8.8 m (28 ft 10 in)
Draught: 3.27 m (10 ft 9 in)
Propulsion:
Speed:
  • 27.5 knots (31.6 mph; 50.9 km/h)
  • 26 kn (30 mph; 48 km/h) full
Range:
  • 3,500 nmi (6,500 km) at 15 kn (28 km/h)
  • 1,000 nmi (1,900 km) at 26 kn (48 km/h)
Complement: 146
Armament:

HMS Whaddon (L45) was a Type I Hunt-class destroyer of the Royal Navy built by Alexander Stephen & Sons of Linthouse, Govan and launched on 16 July 1940. She was laid down on 27 July 1939 and commissioned 28 February 1941. She was adopted by the civil community of Newport Pagnell in Buckinghamshire, as part of the Warship Week campaign in 1942.

Service history[edit]

During 1941 and 1942 she was on North Sea Convoy escort duties

She was then allocated to the Mediterranean Fleet in March 1943 where she undertook escort and patrol duties and provided cover for the allied landings in Sicily and Salerno.

On 29 September 1945 Whaddon sailed from Gibraltar to Devonport and was placed in reserve.[1] She was scrapped at Faslane in April 1959. She has since had a British Sea Cadet Corps unit named after it, T.S Whaddon.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Critchley, Mike, "British Warships Since 1945: Part 3: Destroyers", Maritime Books: Liskeard, UK, 1982. ISBN 0-9506323-9-2, page 29

Publications[edit]

External links[edit]