Hanriot HD.32

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HD.32
Hanriot HD.32 0 002.jpg
Role Military trainer
Manufacturer Hanriot, Zmaj aircraft from Zemun Yugoslavia
First flight 1924
Primary user Aéronautique Militaire

The Hanriot HD.32 was a military trainer aircraft built in France in the 1920s. Derived from the HD.14 and sharing the same basic configuration as it, the HD.32 was a substantially revised design, with redesigned tailplane, undercarriage, and wings of shorter span. The HD.14's wooden construction was replaced in part with metal structure.

The HD.32 was Hanriot's entry in a 1924 Aéronautique Militaire competition to select a new trainer, and as the winner, was ordered in quantity as the HD.32 EP.2. The type HD.320 was also built in Yugoslavia by Zmaj aircraft in Zemun, using an Salmson 9Ac, Siemens Sh12 or Walter NZ-120, engine.

In 1927, the Paraguayan Military Aviation School received three HD.32 that were intensively used as primary trainers. They received the serials E.1, E.2 and E.3 (E meaning Escuela, School). They were replaced by five Consolidated Fleet 2 in 1931 and withdrawn from use in late 1932.


Operators[edit]

 France
 El Salvador
 Japan
  • One aircraft only.
 Paraguay
 Kingdom of Yugoslavia
  • 12 aircraft H.320 mod. 1926, Product: Aeroplanes Hanriot France
  • 45 aircraft H.320 mod. 1928, Product: Zmaj - Zemun Yugoslavia

Variants[edit]

  • HD.32 - main production version for Aéronautique Militaire with Le Rhône 9C engine
  • HD.320 - version with Salmson 9Ac engine (12 built + 45 Zmaj Zemun Yugoslavia)[1][2]
  • HD.321 - version with Clerget 9B engine (11 built, plus 4 converted from HD.32 and four converted from HD.14)

Specifications[edit]

General characteristics

  • Crew: Two, pilot and observer
  • Length: 7.11 m (23 ft 4 in)
  • Wingspan: 9.20 m (30 ft 2 in)
  • Height: 2.95 m (9 ft 8 in)
  • Wing area: 29.8 m2 (321 ft2)
  • Empty weight: 510 kg (1,120 lb)
  • Gross weight: 760 kg (1,680 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Le Rhône 9C, 60 kW (80 hp)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 120 km/h (75 mph)
  • Range: 200 km (125 miles)
  • Service ceiling: 3,850 m (12,600 ft)

See also[edit]

Related lists

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Petrovic, Ognjan M. (2000). Military Aeroplanes of Kingdom of Jugoslavia 1918-1930. Beograd: MJVB LET-Flight. pp. 21–84.
  2. ^ Janić, Čedomir; O. Petrović (2011). Short History of Aviation in Serbia. Beograd: Aerokomunikacije. ISBN 978-86-913973-2-6.

References[edit]

  • Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation. London: Studio Editions. p. 470. 
  • World Aircraft Information Files. London: Bright Star Publishing. pp. File 896 Sheet 11. 
  • Hagedorn, Dan; Antonio Luis Sapienza: Aircraft of the Chaco War, 1928-1935. Schiffer Publishing Co. Atglen, PA. 1996
  • Petrovic, Ognjan M. (2000). Military Aeroplanes of Kingdom of Jugoslavia 1918-1930. Beograd: MJVB LET-Flight. pp. 21–84. 
  • Janić, Čedomir; O. Petrović (2011). Short History of Aviation in Serbia. Beograd: Aerokomunikacije. ISBN 978-86-913973-2-6.