Hate Me (Blue October song)

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"Hate Me"
Hate Me.jpg
Single by Blue October
from the album Foiled
ReleasedJanuary 24, 2006
Format
GenreAlternative rock
Length6:20
LabelUniversal
Songwriter(s)Justin Furstenfeld
Producer(s)
Blue October singles chronology
"Calling You"
(2003)
"Hate Me"
(2006)
"Into the Ocean"
(2006)

"Hate Me" is a song by American alternative rock group Blue October. The song peaked at number two on Billboard's Alternative Songs chart and number 29 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100. In 2007, the video for the song was nominated for a MuchMusic Video Award for best international video. The video is featured in the 2007 karaoke video game for PlayStation 2, Singstar Pop. The song won an ASCAP award in 2007.[1] On July 13, 2012, the song was certified platinum for sales of one million in the United States.

The song was initially released on the 2006 album Foiled, and several versions have been released since. A studio acoustic version was released to fans who pre-ordered Foiled. A live acoustic version was also released on the EP Foiled Again. A live acoustic version, which was recorded on the band's radio promotional tour prior to Foiled's release, was released on 97X Green Room 2, a 2006 radio station compilation album. Another live acoustic version was released on the live acoustic album Ugly Side: An Acoustic Evening with Blue October in 2010. Other live versions of the song appear on the iTunes exclusive EP Live at Lollapalooza 2006, as well as the live album Teach Your Baby Well Live, and the live album/concert film Things We Do At Night - Live From Texas. A solo acoustic version was released on lead singer Justin Furstenfeld's 2014 album Songs from an Open Book.

Content[edit]

Furstenfeld wrote "Hate Me" as a response to the way his drug addiction and depression damaged his relationships with his girlfriend Maime, for whom he wrote the song "Calling You". An authentic voicemail Furstenfeld received from his mother in which she expresses concern for whether he is doing well and taking his medication is featured at the beginning of the song.[2]

Video[edit]

The music video for "Hate Me," directed by Kevin Kerslake, begins with Furstenfeld sitting on his bed holding an answering machine and playing the tape of his mother which can be heard at the beginning of the song. After the message stops playing, Furstenfeld begins to walk through the house, seeing memories of him and his mother - her talking to him as a young boy, taking Prom pictures, and finally attempting to wake him from a blackout - replay in different rooms. These scenes alternate with footage of Blue October singing the song in the house's attic. At the end of the video, Furstenfeld takes the answering machine to a cemetery and lays it on his mother's grave.[3] The video led many fans to believe that Jeremy and Justin's mother had died. She is in fact alive, and she plays herself in the video. The fictional narrative about her dying was conceived by the music video director.

Chart performance[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pop Republix.tv (May 1, 2007). "ASCAP Award Recipients" (PDF).[permanent dead link]
  2. ^ Gil Kaufman (April 10, 2006). "Cockroaches, Porn, Voices Fill Blue October Singer's Brain". MTV.com. Retrieved September 30, 2015.
  3. ^ Vevo. ""Hate Me" Official Music Video". Missing or empty |url= (help)
  4. ^ "Blue October Chart History (Hot 100)". Billboard. Retrieved August 7, 2017.
  5. ^ "Blue October Chart History (Adult Pop Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved April 1, 2018.
  6. ^ "Blue October Chart History (Alternative Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved August 7, 2017.
  7. ^ "Blue October Chart History (Mainstream Rock)". Billboard. Retrieved August 7, 2017.
  8. ^ "Blue October Chart History (Pop Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved April 1, 2018.
  9. ^ "Hot 100: Year End 2006". Billboard. billboard.com. Retrieved September 22, 2019.
  10. ^ "Adult Pop Songs – Year-End 2006". Billboard. Retrieved September 22, 2019.
  11. ^ "Alternative Songs – Year-End 2006". Billboard. Retrieved September 22, 2019.