Highland Railway E Class

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Highland Railway Bruce or E class
Type and origin
Power type Steam
Designer David Jones
Builder Clyde Locomotive Company
Serial number 1–8
Build date 1886
Total produced 8
Specifications
Configuration:
 • Whyte 4-4-0
 • UIC 2′B n2
Gauge 4 ft 8 12 in (1,435 mm) standard gauge
Leading dia. 3 ft 9 12 in (1.156 m)
Driver dia. 6 ft 3 in (1,905 mm)
Loco weight 43 long tons (44 t; 48 short tons)
Water cap 2,250 imp gal (10,200 l; 2,700 US gal)
Boiler 4 ft 2 in (1.27 m) diameter, 9 ft 9 12 in (2.98 m) between tubeplates
Boiler pressure 160 lbf/in2 (1.10 MPa)
Heating surface 1,140 square feet (106 m2)
Cylinders Two (outside)
Cylinder size 18 in × 24 in (457 mm × 610 mm)
Valve gear Stephenson
Performance figures
Tractive effort 14,100 lbf (62.72 kN)
Career
Operators Highland Railway
London, Midland & Scottish
Class HR: Bruce; E (from 1901)
Power class LMS: 1P
Nicknames Clyde Bogies

The Highland Railway E Class was a class of 4-4-0 steam locomotive designed by David Jones for passenger service. They were also known as the 'Clyde Bogies' as they were built by the Clyde Locomotive Company in Glasgow, Scotland. They were the first locomotives built by that company.[1]

Built in 1886, they were a development of Jones' previous F Class.[1] Originally known as the Bruce class,[2] they were assigned to Class E under Drummond's locomotive classification scheme of 1901.[3]

Dimensions[edit]

The boiler pressure was 160 lbf/in2 (1,100 kPa), the cylinders were 18 by 24 inches (457 mm × 610 mm), and the driving wheel diameter was 6 feet 3 12 inches (1,918 mm).[1]

Numbering[edit]

Table of locomotives[4][5]
HR
Number
Name Entered
service
Withdrawn Notes
76 Bruce December 1886 1923 Displayed at the International Exhibition of Industry, Science and Art, Edinburgh 1886. Renumbered 76A in 1917
77 Lovat May 1886 1918 Withdrawn and reinstated in 1915. Renumbered 77A in 1917
78 Lochalsh June 1886 1923 Renumbered 78A in 1917
79 Atholl June 1886 1923 Renumbered 79A in 1917
80 Stafford July 1886 1923 Renumbered 80A in 1919
81 Colville July 1886 Renumbered 81A in 1919
82 Fife September 1886 1930 Renamed Durn in 1908; name removed 1917. Renumbered 82A in 1917, and 14278 by LMS
83 Cadboll October 1886 1923 Renamed Monkland in 1902. Renumbered 83A in 1917

Transfer to LMS[edit]

All were still in service at the end of 1922, but when the Highland Railway engines passed to the London, Midland and Scottish Railway (LMS) on 1 September 1923, five had been withdrawn. Numbers 76A and 81A were withdrawn in 1924, but only 82A survived long enough to carry its LMS number (14278) – it was withdrawn in April 1930.[6] No 79A was withdrawn in 1923 and stored at Aviemore until called for breaking up; this occurred at Kilmarnock in 1925.[4]

References[edit]

  • Baxter, Bertram (1984). Baxter, David, ed. British Locomotive Catalogue 1825–1923, Volume 4: Scottish and remaining English Companies in the LMS Group. Ashbourne, Derbyshire: Moorland Publishing Company. p. 193. 
  • Casserley, H. C. & Johnston, Stuart W. (1974) [1966]. Locomotives at the Grouping 3: London, Midland and Scottish Railway. Shepperton, Surrey: Ian Allan. p. 137. ISBN 0-7110-0554-0. 
  • Cormack, J.R.H.; Stevenson, J.L. (1988). Greenwood, William, ed. Highland Railway Locomotives Book 1: Early Days to the 'Lochs'. Locomotives of the LMS. Lincoln: RCTS. ISBN 0-901115-64-9. 

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Cormack & Stevenson 1988, p. 101.
  2. ^ Baxter 1984, p. 197.
  3. ^ Cormack & Stevenson 1988, pp. 101,159.
  4. ^ a b Cormack & Stevenson 1988, p. 108.
  5. ^ Baxter 1984, p. 193.
  6. ^ Cormack & Stevenson 1988, pp. 104,106,108.