Highway 79 Bridge

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Highway 79 Bridge
Highway 79 bridge near Clarendon, AR 004.jpg
Highway 79 Bridge is located in Arkansas
Highway 79 Bridge
Highway 79 Bridge is located in the United States
Highway 79 Bridge
Location US 79 and White River, Clarendon, Arkansas
Coordinates34°41′22″N 91°19′1″W / 34.68944°N 91.31694°W / 34.68944; -91.31694Coordinates: 34°41′22″N 91°19′1″W / 34.68944°N 91.31694°W / 34.68944; -91.31694
Arealess than one acre
Built1930 (1930)
ArchitectMultiple
Architectural styleWarren Truss
MPSClarendon MRA
NRHP reference #84000190[1] (original)
15000629 (increase)
Significant dates
Added to NRHPNovember 1, 1984
Boundary increaseSeptember 28, 2015

The Highway 79 Bridge is a historic bridge in Clarendon, Arkansas. It is a tall two-span Warren truss bridge, formerly carrying two-lane U.S. Route 79 (US 79), a major arterial highway in the region, across the White River just west of the city's downtown. The steel truss has a total length of 720 feet (220 m), set on four concrete piers. The outer pairs of piers are 160 feet (49 m) apart, and the middle pair are 400 feet (120 m) apart. The approaches are concrete, set on concrete pilings, with the western approach continuing for some 3 miles (4.8 km) across secondary water bodies. The bridge was built in 1930-31 by the Austin Bridge Company.[2]

The bridge was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984,[1], and was closed in August 2016 when a replacement bridge to the south opened.[3] Since its closing, the 1931 bridge has been subject to local restoration efforts as a bike and pedestrian path.[4]

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  1. ^ a b National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service.
  2. ^ "NRHP nomination for Highway 79 Bridge" (PDF). Arkansas Preservation. Retrieved 2015-06-16.
  3. ^ Higgerson, Shea (2016-09-22). "Clarendon hopes to save bridge". Stuttgart Daily Leader. Retrieved 2018-01-08.
  4. ^ Briggs, Porter (June 10, 2019). "Save the bridge". Arkansas Democrat-Gazette. Little Rock: WEHCO Media.