Indiana State Sycamores football

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Indiana State Sycamores football
2018 Indiana State Sycamores football team
Indiana State Sycamores wordmark.svg
First season 1896
Athletic director Sherard Clinkscales
Head coach Curt Mallory
2nd season, 2–14 (.125)
Stadium Memorial Stadium
(Capacity: 12,764)
Year built 1924
Field surface Field Turf
Location Terre Haute, Indiana
NCAA division Division I FCS
Conference Missouri Valley Football Conference
All-time record 386–519–23 (.428)
Bowl record 0–1 (.000)
Playoff appearances 3 (Div. I FCS)
1983, 1984, 2014
Playoff record 2-3 (Div. I FCS)
Conference titles 1
1964
Rivalries Illinois State Redbirds
Southern Illinois Salukis
Eastern Illinois Panthers
Ball State Cardinals
Consensus All-Americans 16
Colors Royal Blue and White[1]
         
Fight song March On!
Mascot Sycamore Sam
Marching band Marching Sycamores
Outfitter Under Armor
Website GoSycamores.com
For information on all Indiana State University sports, see Indiana State Sycamores

The Indiana State Sycamores football team is the NCAA Division I football program of Indiana State University in Terre Haute, Indiana. They currently compete in the Missouri Valley Football Conference. The team last played in the NCAA Playoffs in the 2014 NCAA Division I Football Championship. Their first season was 1896. The Sycamore's greatest season was 1983, when coach Dennis Raetz led them to the 2nd round of the 1983 NCAA Division I Football Championship versus the Southern Illinois Salukis and ended the season with a record of 9–4. The Sycamores also appeared in 1984 NCAA Division I Football Championship playoffs. The Indiana State Sycamores play their home games at Memorial Stadium, which seats 12,764.

History[edit]

Classifications[edit]

  • 1952–1964: NCAA/NAIA
  • 1965–1972: NCAA College Division
  • 1970–1973: NAIA Division I
  • 1973–1975: NCAA Division II
  • 1976–1977: NCAA Division I
  • 1978–1981: NCAA Division I–A
  • 1982–present: NCAA Division I–AA/FCS

Conference memberships[edit]

Team Accomplishments[edit]

Bowl games[edit]

The Sycamores have participated in one bowl game, garnering a record of 0-1.

Year Bowl Opponent Result
1949 Shrine Bowl Southern Illinois L 14–41

Division I NCAA Playoffs[edit]

The Sycamores have appeared in 3 NCAA Division I Football Championships. Their combined record is 2–3.

Playoff Games

Date played Round Winner Runner-Up
1983 NCAA Division I First Round Indiana State 16 Eastern Illinois 13
1983 Pecan Bowl Southern Illinois 23 Indiana State 7
1984 Pecan Bowl Middle Tennessee State 42 Indiana State 41
2014 NCAA Division I First Round Indiana State 36 Eastern Kentucky 16
2014 NCAA Division I Second Round Chattanooga 35 Indiana State 14

Conference championships[edit]

The Sycamores shared the 1964 Indiana Collegiate Conference title with 4 schools (Ball State, Butler, Evansville, Valparaiso, with the Sycamores finishing with a 4–2 conference record and a 6–2 overall record. [2]

Rankings[edit]

The Sycamores reached the AP and United Press International Top Ten mid-way through the 1974 season; they would not return to the Top Ten until the 1983 season.

Stadiums[edit]

Year Home
1949–present Memorial Stadium (Terre Haute), constructed in 1924.
1896–1948 Multiple Venues, including Parsons Field.

The Sycamores have played football at venerable Memorial Stadium since the 1949 campaign. Originally constructed in 1922–24, at a cost of $450,000; the 12,764-seat stadium remains a fixture at the intersection of Wabash and Brown Avenues in Terre Haute, IN.

Memorial Stadium’s inauguration was on May 5, 1925, as the local minor league baseball team, the Terre Haute Tots, hosted their Three-I League rivals, the Peoria Tractors, before an estimated crowd of 9,000. Among the esteemed visitors were Major League Baseball Commissioner Judge Kennesaw Mountain Landis and Charles Barnard of the Cleveland Indians.

The facility was acquired (via a 99-year lease) by Indiana State University in 1967. The installation of Astroturf made Indiana State the first university to own a football stadium with artificial turf.

Player of the year[edit]

National (2)[edit]

  • Shakir Bell – 2011 Walter Payton Award Finalist (Top 2 vote receiver)
  • Johnny Towalid – 2012 Co-National FCS Defensive Back of the Year (by College Football Performance)[3]

Conference (10)[edit]

All-Americans 1st Team (19)[edit]

  • Jeff Keller, DE – 1967 American Football Coaches Association
  • Chris Hicks, OT – 1975 American Football Coaches Association
  • Vincent Allen, RB – 1976 American Football Coaches Association
  • Ed Martin, DE – 1983 American Football Coaches Association
  • Wayne Davis, DB – 1984 American Football Coaches Association
  • Vencie Glenn, DB – 1985 American Football Coaches Association
  • Steve Mckeel DB – 1986 Associated Press
  • Mike Simmonds, OT – 1986 American Football Coaches Association
  • Steve McKeel DB – 1987 Associated Press
  • Derrick Franklin, RB – 1991 Walter Camp, The Sports Network
  • Shawn Moore, OG – 1993 American Football Coaches Association
  • Dan Brandenburg, DT – 1994 American Football Coaches Association
  • Dan Brandenburg, DT – 1995 The Sports Network, American Football Quarterly
  • Tom Allison, PK – 1995 Don Hansen’s Football Gazette
  • Troy Lefevra, DE – 1998 Don Hansen’s Football Gazette
  • DeJuan Alfonzo, DB/RS – 1999 American Football Coaches Association
  • Shakir Bell, RB – 2011 Associated Press, American Football Coaches Association,[5] The Sports Network
  • Ben Obaseki, DL – 2011 Associated Press[6]
  • Joshua Appel, LS – 2015 STATS All-American[7]

Academic All-American (5)[edit]

  • Gary Brown, E – 1971
  • Michael Eads, E – 1972
  • Mark Maley E −1973
  • Daniel Millington, DE – 2009
  • Alex Sewall, DB – 2011[8]

NCAA Post-Graduate Scholarship (1)[edit]

  • Jeffrey Miller, QB – 1986

All-Conference (125+)[edit]

All-Indiana Collegiate Conference (20+)[edit]

  • Bob Masulovich, Offensive Line, 1952
  • Jack Griffith, Offensive Line, 1953
  • Bob Masulovich, Offensive Line, 1953
  • Jack Griffith, End, 1954
  • Bob Masulovich, Offensive Line, 1954
  • Bill Griffith, End, 1955
  • Wally Geib, Offensive Line, 1962
  • Joe Beach, Defensive Line, 1962
  • Wally Geib, Offensive Line, 1963
  • John Allen, Offensive Line, 1964
  • Rolland Beckham, Offensive Line, 1964
  • Arthur Fallon, Offensive Tackle, 1964
  • Willie Smith, End, 1964
  • Emmitt "Tank" Tyler, Fullback, 1964
  • Edgar Freese, Offensive Line, 1965


  • Bernard Heins, Offensive Line, 1965
  • John Newbitt, Halfback, 1965
  • Bob Pychinka, Linebacker, 1965
  • John Truitt, End, 1965
  • John Truitt, End, 1966
  • Joe Fiedler, Center, 1966
  • Randy Payne, Halfback, 1966
  • Bob Pychinka, Linebacker, 1966
  • Timon Kendall, Offensive Line, 1967
  • Rich Attonito, Defensive Back, 1967
  • Stan Worrall, Defensive Line, 1967

[9][10][11]

All-Missouri Valley Conference (42)[edit]

  • Vincent Allen, RB, 1977
  • Don Jackson, DB, 1977
  • Gary Gamen, DT, 1978
  • John Allman, DB, 1978
  • Kirk Wilson, WR, 1979
  • Eddie Ruffin, WR, 1979
  • George DeTella, OT, 1979
  • Reggie Allen, QB, 1979
  • Gerry Gluscic, DE, 1979
  • John Allman, DB, 1979
  • Hubert Moore, TE, 1980
  • Eddie Ruffin, WR, 1980
  • Mark Gradkowski, OG, 1980
  • John Gaunt, DT, 1980
  • Craig Shaffer, LB, 1980
  • John Allman, DB, 1980
  • Hubert Moore, TE 1981
  • Kirk Wilson, WR, 1981
  • Craig Shaffer, LB, 1981
  • Walter Seaphus, NG, 1982
  • Ed Martin, DE, 1982
  • Dan Maher, LB, 1982
  • Bob Koehne, OT, 1983
  • Rich Dawson, C, 1983
  • Jeff Miller, QB, 1983
  • Ed Martin, DE, 1983
  • Quintin Mikell, LB, 1983
  • Kevin Ramsey, DB, 1983
  • Wayne Davis, DB, 1984
  • Steve Buxton, OG, 1984
  • Rich Dawson, C, 1984
  • Jeff Miller, QB, 1984
  • Darrold Clardy, RB, 1984
  • Scott Bridges, PK, 1984
  • Doug Arnold, NG, 1984
  • Brad Verdun, DT, 1984
  • Jeff Miller, QB, 1985
  • Doug Arnold, NG, 1985
  • Terry Bell, WR, 1985
  • Vencie Glenn, DB, 1985
  • Mike Simmonds, OG, 1985
  • Kurt Bell, DE, 1985

All-Missouri Valley Football Conference (70)[edit]

  • Mike Simmonds, OT, 1986
  • Steve McKeel, DB, 1986
  • Troy Johnson, LB, 1986
  • Tim Cunningham, LB, 1986
  • Chuck Standiford, P, 1986
  • Pete Endre, OT, 1987
  • Steve McKeel, DB, 1987
  • Gary Cannon, WR, 1987
  • Steve Elmlinger, WR, 1988
  • Tori Vactor, RB, 1988
  • Ken Hopp, LB, 1988
  • Troy Mickens, DB, 1988
  • Rodney Porter, TE, 1989
  • Mark Bertram, DT, 1989
  • Derrick Franklin, RB, 1990
  • Charles Swann, WR, 1990
  • Eric Christensen, LB, 1991
  • Derrick Franklin, RB, 1991
  • Charles Swann, WR, 1991
  • Dyrrah Christon, NG, 1992
  • David Wright, RB, 1992
  • Dan Brandenburg, DT, 1993
  • Von Ganaway, FS, 1993
  • Tim Giebels, OT, 1993
  • Shawn Moore, OG, 1993
  • David Wright, RB, 1993
  • Dan Brandenburg, DT, 1994
  • Dustin Rusch, DT, 1994
  • Dan Brandenburg, DT, 1995
  • Dre Knox, DB, 1996
  • Richard Moss, LB, 1996
  • Robert High, FS, 1997
  • Shannon Jackson, DT, 1997
  • DeJuan Alfonzo, DB, 1998
  • Troy Lefevra, DE, 1998
  • DeJuan Alfonzo, DB, 1999
  • Nathan Al-Ghetta, FB, 1999
  • Shannon Jackson, DE, 1999
  • Troy Lefevra, DE, 1999
  • Richard Harris, DE, 2001
  • Richard Harris, DE, 2002
  • Dietrich Lapsley, LB, 2002
  • Soso Dede, KR, 2002
  • Ryan King, TE, 2003
  • Kyle Mitchell, DE, 2003
  • Kyle Mitchell, DE, 2004
  • Sam Logan, WR, 2005
  • Kyle Mitchell, DE, 2005
  • Jamie Petrowski, TE, 2005
  • Shonda Faulkner, LB, 2007
  • Darrius Gates, RB, 2010
  • Brock Lough, FB, 2010
  • Ben Obaseki, DE, 2010
  • Alex Sewall, DB, 2010
  • Aaron Archie, LB, 2011
  • Shakir Bell, RB, 2011
  • Alex Jones, TE, 2011
  • Brock Lough, FB, 2011
  • FN Lutz, OL, 2011
  • Ben Obaseki, DE, 2011
  • Alex Sewall, DB, 2011
  • Shakir Bell, RB, 2012
  • Aaron Archie, LB, 2012
  • Ben Obaseski, DE, 2012
  • Johnny Towalid, DB, 2012
  • Lucas Hileman, P, 2012
  • Connor Underwood, DL, 2013
  • Connor Underwood, DL, 2014
  • Josh Appel, LS, 2015
  • Josh Appel, LS, 2016

Career leaders[edit]

Passing[edit]

Player Years Comp Att TD Yds Pct. Int
Mike Perish 2012–2014 618 1,050 45 6,696 .590 28
Jeff Miller 1982–1985 555 1,016 40 6,448 .552 33
John Sahm 1986–1989 341 668 30 5,139 .496 38
Reggie Allen 1978–1981 367 782 29 5,094 .469 46
Ronnie Fouch 2010–2011 322 544 38 4,316 .592 15
Kip Hennelly 1991–1993 249 490 19 3,158 .508 27
Julian Reese 2001–2002 267 499 20 2,961 .535 21
Kevin Cox 1993–1996 238 528 20 2,885 .45 22
Kyle Frondorf 1986–1988 208 391 8 2,778 .532 24
Blayne Baggett 2005 284 473 15 2,741 .600 13

Rushing[edit]

Player Years Att Yds Avg. TD
Vincent Allen 1973–1977 832 4,335 5.21 31
Shakir Bell 2010–2013 672 4,214 6.3 28
David Wright 1992–1995 784 4,181 5.33 22
Derrick Franklin 1989–1991 710 3,231 4.55 23
Eric Robinson 1979–1982 443 2,169 4.90 22
Jake Shields 2001–2004 521 2,119 4.07 19
Darrius Gates 2006–2010 396 2,010 5.08 20
Jim Brumfield 1967–1969 448 1,998 4.46 23
Darrold Clardy 1981–1984 355 1,594 4.49 19
Tori Vactor 1987–1988 312 1,545 4.95 12

Receiving[edit]

Player Years Rcpt Yds Avg. TD
Sam Logan 2003–2006 196 2,385 12.2 9
Robert Tonyan, Jr 2013–2016 147 2,029 13.8 20
Carl Berman 2003–2006 136 1,666 12.1 11
Rodney Porter 1986–1989 135 1,906 14.1 9
Terry Bell 1982–1985 132 2,048 15.5 13
Joe Downing 1982–1985 115 1,608 14.0 15
Eddie Ruffin 1978–1981 110 1,831 16.6 11
Gary Owens 2013–2015 105 1,373 13.1 13
Larry Brown 1993–1996 105 1,197 11.4 6
Steve Elminger 1987–1989 102 1,823 17.9 10
Steve Schmid 1967–1969 100 1,394 13.9 11

Scoring[edit]

Player Years TD FG PAT1 PAT2 PTS
Kyle Hooper 2003–2007 0 42 85 0 221
Vincent Allen 1973–1977 33 0 0 1 200
Tom Allison 1992–1995 0 38 82 0 196
Scott Bridges 1983–1985 0 31 87 0 180
Shakir Bell 2010–2013 30 0 0 0 180
Eric Heidorn 2013-2015 0 29 81 0 168
Mike Megyesi 1999–2002 0 27 83 0 164
Jim Brumfield 1967–1969 26 0 0 0 156
Robert Tonyan, Jr 2013–2016 22 0 0 4 140
David Wright 1992–1995 23 0 0 1 140

Career leaders in bold

Coaching leaders (by wins)[edit]

The current coach is Curt Mallory

Coach (Alma Mater) Seasons Years Games W L T Pct.
Dennis Raetz (Nebraska, 1968) 18 1980–1997 200 94 105 1 .473
Wally Marks (Chicago, 1927) 16 1927–30, 33–41, 46–48 125 62 56 7 .524
Jerry Huntsman (Wabash, 1952) 7 1966–1972 68 43 24 1 .642
Bill Jones (Ohio Wesleyan, 1939) 9 1957–1965 70 32 37 1 .464
Tim McGuire (Nebraska, 1975) 7 1998–2004 79 24 55 0 .304
Art Strum (Wisconsin-LaCrosse, 1916) 6 1923–26, 32, 42 43 21 20 2 .512
Tom Harp (Muskingum, 1951) 5 1973–1977 51 20 31 0 .392
Trent Miles (Indiana State, 1987) 5 2008–2012 56 20 36 0 .357
Mike Sanford (Southern California, 1976) 4 2013–2016 48 18 30 0 .375
Mark Dean (Northern Illinois, 1938) 5 1951–54, 56 39 15 20 4 .436
Dick Jamieson (Bradley, 1961) 2 1978–1979 22 11 11 0 .500
Phil Brown (Butler, 1923) 1 1945 8 5 2 1 .688
J. Roy Goodlad (Wisconsin, 1929) 1 1931 7 4 3 0 .571
CPO Bob LeCroy[a] (SE Okla St, 19--) 1 1944 6 2 4 0 .333
Paul Selge (Indiana State, 1943) 1 1955 9 2 7 0 .222
George Ashworth (Indiana State, 1935) 2 1949–1950 19 2 16 1 .132
Curt Mallory (Michigan, 1990) 2 2017–present 15 2 13 0 .133
Lou West (Cincinnati, 1976) 3 2005–2007 33 1 32 0 .030
various (7 others) 13 1896–09, 1920, 1943 42 9 28 5 .274
Total 25 1896-2017 926 385 518 23 .428

Career leaders in bold

  1. ^ Chief Petty Officer (CPO) LeCroy was member of US Navy's V-12 program staff during World War II

Coach of the Year (11)[edit]

District / Region (4)[edit]

  • Mike Sanford – 2014 AFCA Region #4[12]
  • Trent Miles – 2010 AFCA Region #4[13]
  • Jerry Huntsman – 1968 NCAA District #2[14]
  • Jerry Huntsman – 1966 NCAA District #1

Conference (7)[edit]

Notable alumni[edit]

Sycamores in Professional Leagues (51)[edit]

Fifty former Sycamores have played in professional football leagues. The leagues include the NFL, CFL, AFL. and the UFL.
The most notable players are:

Player Class Year Position Primary Team(s) Career Highlight(s)
Jameer Thurman 2016 Linebacker Calgary Stampeders 2017–Present
Shakir Bell 2012 Running Back Ottawa Redblacks 2014–Present Grey Cup Champion, All-American
Jamie Petrowski 2006 Tight End Tennessee Titans 2006–2012 3rd Team All-American
Dan Brandenburg 1996 Defensive Tackle Buffalo Bills 1996–1999 42 Career Games
John Bock 1994 Offensive Line Miami Dolphins 1995–2000 17 Career Starts
Vencie Glenn 1986 Defensive Back San Diego Chargers 1986–1995 35 Career INTs
Wayne Davis 1985 Defensive Back San Diego Chargers 1985–1990 5 Career INTs
Craig Shaffer 1982 Line Backer St. Louis Cardinals 1982–1984 18 Career Games
Tunch Ilkin 1980 Offensive Line Pittsburgh Steelers 1980–1993 2x Pro Bowl Lineman

All-Star Game participants (15)[edit]

  • 1981 – Craig Shaffer, LB (Blue-Gray)
  • 1982 – Kirk Wilson, WR (Senior Bowl)
  • 1985 – Vencie Glenn, DB (Blue-Gray)
  • 1986 – Vencie Glenn, DB (Senior Bowl)
  • 1990 – Steve Elmlinger, WR (Senior Bowl)
  • 1992 – Charles Swann, WR (Senior Bowl)
  • 1992 – Charles Swann, WR (Japan Bowl)
  • 1995 – Dan Brandenburg, DT (Blue-Gray)
  • 1999 – DeJuan Alfonzo, DB (All-Star Gridiron Classic)
  • 2005 – Blayne Baggett, QB (Magnolia Gridiron Classic)
  • 2005 – LaDrelle Bryant, LB (Magnolia Gridiron Classic)
  • 2006 – Kyle Hooper, PK (East Coast Bowl)
  • 2006 – Madison Miller, DE (East Coast Bowl)
  • 2006 – Carl Berman, (Magnolia Gridiron Classic)
  • 2010 – Darrius Gates, RB (FCS Senior Scout Bowl)
  • 2010 – Pat Burke, OG (FCS Senior Scout Bowl)
  • 2013 – FN Lutz, OG (FCS Senior Scout Bowl)

Indiana Football Hall of Fame (34)[edit]

  • Vincent Allen – 2000[15]
  • Max Andress – 1976[16]
  • George Ashworth – 1979[17]
  • Steve Balash – 2009[18]
  • Paul Beck – 1979[19]
  • Phil Brown – 1985[20]
  • Charles "Cocky" Bush – 1976[21]
  • Bob Clayton – 2012[22]
  • Robert Clements – 1988
  • Jim Conover – 1976[23]
  • Rich Dodson – 2003
  • Stewart "Red" Faught – 1981[24]
  • Wayne Fuson – 1974
  • Joe Goodman – 1998
  • Delby Humphrey – 1974
  • Jerry Huntsman – 1985[14]
  • Bill Jones – 1981[25]
  • Charlie Karazsia – 2006[26]
  • Walter "Wally" Marks – 1974
  • Dick Martin – 1976
  • Bob Nesbit – 1976
  • Steve Purichia – 2014[27]
  • R. Douglas Reeser – 2006
  • Ed Robertson – 1996
  • Tim Roth – 2014[28]
  • Van "Rusty" Rutherford – 1976
  • Thomas Stirling – 1988
  • Kenneth "Zip" Sypult – 1987
  • Phil Teegarden – 2001
  • N.E. "Gene" Wernz – 1977
  • Mark Wildman – 2007
  • Roy Lee Williams – 1976
  • Ernie Zeller – 1979
  • Maurey Zlotnik – 2003

Rivalries[edit]

Illinois State[edit]

The Sycamores have met Illinois State annually since 1969 and 48 times in the past 50 seasons. The first game in the series was in 1936, which ended in an 0–0 tie. The Redbirds hold a slight edge (30–36–2) over the Sycamores; the schools also are frequent Homecoming opponents. Indiana State leads in Homecoming games (5–2) in Terre Haute; while in Bloomington-Normal, the series is tied 2–2. The largest crowd in Illinois State football history is the 1970 match-up with Indiana State, 21,500 fans attended saw the Jerry Huntsman-led Sycamores win 28–7.

The schools have been conference rivals since 1981 as members of the Missouri Valley Conference; that rivalry continues in the Missouri Valley Football Conference.

Southern Illinois[edit]

The burgeoning rivalry with Southern Illinois (SIU) has tilted to SIU's advantage in recent seasons, though the Salukis lead the overall series record, 24–23. SIU also own a victory in the only playoff meeting between the schools (a SIU 23–7 win in the 1983 NCAA Div I-AA playoffs).

Following the 1949 season, the Sycamores were invited to the 1949 Shrine Bowl versus the Salukis. The Salukis, who earlier in the season had lost to Indiana State, won the rematch 41–14.

Eastern Illinois[edit]

Since 1901, the Sycamores have played Eastern Illinois 86 times; the series stands at 39–43–4 in favor of Eastern Illinois. The rivalry resumed in 2017 after a 7-year hiatus; the 4-game deal was inked in April, 2016.[29] Indiana State won the most recent tilt, a notable shootout in Charleston by a score of 55-41.

Ball State[edit]

From 1924 to 2014, the Sycamores played Ball State (Ind.) University 65 times; the series stands at 38–24–1 in favor of Ball State.

In 1940, the respective Blue Key chapters sponsored a trophy presentation, the 'Victory Bell' to reward the winner of the annual game between Indiana State and Ball State. The Sycamores currently hold the Victory Bell, having won the last match 27-20 on the road in 2014.

Traditions[edit]

Homecoming[edit]

The term Homecoming was first used in print announcements for the Alumni-Varsity Basketball Game on Dec. 9, 1916. By the year 1919, this event became known as Blue and White Day and featured dances and entertainment for alumni of the Normal School. In 1921 the events were organized around a football game scheduled earlier in the autumn. A bonfire and pep rally were added to the festivities in 1922; the Blue-and-White Parade in 1923; and in 1937, Bette Whitmore (Kappa Kappa) was elected ISUs first Homecoming Queen.[30] The 2010 season will mark the 106th season of Sycamore football and the 91st Homecoming; the Sycamores will face conference foe, Illinois State, on October 9. This will mark the 7th time that Illinois State has been the Homecoming opponent; following a tremoundous victory (59–24) the Sycamores now own a 5–2 mark vs. Illinois State in Homecoming games.

As of 2012; Indiana State owns a 50–36–2 (.580) record in Homecoming games; the outcomes of the remaining 5 games are unknown.

Victory Bell[edit]

A symbol of the traditional rivalry in football between Indiana State and Ball State – Muncie Division, the Victory Bell tradition was inaugurated in 1940 when the Blue Key chapters at both schools arranged to donate a bell to be presented to the victor of the football game. The idea was to start a traditional exchange of the bell as a means of improving relationships between the two student bodies.[31] The Victory Bell series is 19–34–1 in favor of Indiana State – Muncie Division.

Future non-conference opponents[edit]

Announced schedules as of September 21, 2018.[32]

2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027
at Kansas at Eastern Illinois at West Virginia at Purdue at Georgia at Purdue at Indiana at Purdue at Indiana
vs. Dayton at Middle Tennessee at Eastern Kentucky
vs. Eastern Kentucky
vs. Eastern Illinois

References[edit]

  1. ^ Marketing & Promotions (July 31, 2015). "Licensing & Logos — Official Web Site of Indiana State Athletics". Gosycamores.com. Retrieved October 18, 2015.
  2. ^ "Security Alert".[dead link]
  3. ^ "ISU's Towalid named top FCS defensive back". Terre Haute Tribune Star.
  4. ^ (tm), e-yearbook.com. "E-Yearbook.com - Search and browse yearbooks online!". www.e-yearbook.com.
  5. ^ "Shakir Bell Named To AFCA FCS Coaches' All-America Team". GoSycamores.com Official Web Site of Indiana State Athletics.
  6. ^ "Shakir Bell And Ben Obaseki Named First Team Associated Press All-America". GoSycamores.com Official Web Site of Indiana State Athletics.
  7. ^ "FCS football: STATS releases its 2015 All-America Team". 15 December 2015.
  8. ^ "Alex Sewall Named First Team Academic All-American". GoSycamores.com – Official Web Site of Indiana State Athletics.
  9. ^ "The Daily Banner 19 November 1965 — Hoosier State Chronicles: Indiana's Digital Historic Newspaper Program". newspapers.library.in.gov.
  10. ^ [1][dead link]
  11. ^ [2][dead link]
  12. ^ "Mike Sanford Named AFCA Regional Coach Of The Year". GoSycamores.com – Official Web Site of Indiana State Athletics.
  13. ^ "Trent Miles Earns 2010 AFCA Regional Coach Of The Year Honors". GoSycamores.com Official Web Site of Indiana State Athletics.
  14. ^ a b "HUNTSMAN, JERRY – Indiana Football Hall of Fame". indiana-football.org.
  15. ^ "ALLEN, VINCENT – Indiana Football Hall of Fame". indiana-football.org.
  16. ^ "ANDRESS, MAX – Indiana Football Hall of Fame". indiana-football.org.
  17. ^ "ASHWORTH, GEORGE – Indiana Football Hall of Fame". indiana-football.org.
  18. ^ "BALASH, STEVE – Indiana Football Hall of Fame". indiana-football.org.
  19. ^ "BECK, PAUL – Indiana Football Hall of Fame". indiana-football.org.
  20. ^ "BROWN, PHIL – Indiana Football Hall of Fame". indiana-football.org.
  21. ^ "BUSH, CHARLES "COCKY" – Indiana Football Hall of Fame". indiana-football.org.
  22. ^ "CLAYTON, BOB – Indiana Football Hall of Fame". indiana-football.org.
  23. ^ "CONOVER, JAMES "JIM" – Indiana Football Hall of Fame". indiana-football.org.
  24. ^ "FAUGHT, STEWART "RED" – Indiana Football Hall of Fame". indiana-football.org.
  25. ^ "JONES, WILLIAM – Indiana Football Hall of Fame". indiana-football.org.
  26. ^ "KARAZSIA, CHARLIE – Indiana Football Hall of Fame". indiana-football.org.
  27. ^ "PURICHIA, STEVE – Indiana Football Hall of Fame". indiana-football.org.
  28. ^ "ROTH, TIM – Indiana Football Hall of Fame". indiana-football.org.
  29. ^ "Indiana State, Eastern Illinois to renew series in 2017 - Indiana State University". Indiana State University.
  30. ^ Indiana State University: About ISU: History and Traditions Archived 2012-07-08 at the Wayback Machine.
  31. ^ "Indiana State University Archives Home".
  32. ^ "Indiana State Sycamores Football Schedules and Future Schedules". Retrieved September 21, 2018.

External links[edit]