Institute of Food Research

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Institute of Food Research[1][2]
The main entrance to the Institute of Food Research
The Institute of Food Research in Norwich
Abbreviation IFR[1][2]
Predecessor Low Temperature Research Station (LTRS),
National Institute for Research in Dairying (NIRD)[2]
Formation 1968; 49 years ago (1968),
as the Food Research Institute (FRI)[2]
Founded at Norwich[2]
Type Statutory authority
Registration no. Companies House: 03009972[3]
Charity Commission: 1058499[1][4]
Legal status Non-profit research institute and charity
Purpose Food research in the United Kingdom
Location
Region
United Kingdom, worldwide
Services Food science
Methods Research
Membership
146 scientists
Director of IFR
Professor Ian Charles[5]
Board of Trustees Chairman
Tim Brears[5]
Main organ
IFR Board of Trustees[5]
Budget (2016)
£17,025,000[4]
Revenue (2016)
£15,176,000[4]
Staff (2016)
164[4]
Mission "The world-wide advancement of education in food sciences and food related matters by undertaking research and disseminating for public benefit the useful results of such research"[4]
Website IFR.ac.uk

The Institute of Food Research[1][2] (IFR[1]) is a publically funded British centre for research and training in food science and health. It is located at the south-west outskirts of Norwich, near Colney in Norfolk, England, United Kingdom. The IFR is a member of the Norwich Research Park (NRP), along with the John Innes Centre (JIC), the Earlham Institute (EI), the University of East Anglia (UEA), and the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital (NNUH).[6]

The IFR is a non-profit research institute, a private company limited by guarantee without shares, and registered charity (registration number: 1058499).[1][5][4] It receives strategic funding from the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC),[7], and additional funding from other organisations.[1] Its Companies House registration number for companies in England and Wales is: 03009972, and its first date of incorporation on to the register was 16 January 1995.[3]

Foundation[edit]

The Institute of Food Research was created in 1968; 49 years ago (1968), when it was spread over four sites; the Meat Research Institute (MRI) at Langford near Bristol, the Food Research Institute (FRI) at Colney in Norwich, the National Institute for Research in Dairying (NIRD) in Shinfield near Reading, and the Long Ashton Research Station (food related departments only of the last two). At the end of 1990, the Meat Research Institute Bristol laboratory was closed, and in 1992, the National Institute for Research in Dairying Reading laboratory was moved onto the campus of the University of Reading. In 1998, it was decided that the Institute's activities should be consolidated in one location: Norwich, which was completed in September 1999.[2]

Current focus[edit]

The Institute of Food Research is the UK's only integrated basic science provider focused on food, and is a world leading contributor to harnessing food for health, and controlling food-related disease. The outcomes of its work feed into national and international strategies, and deliver advice and solutions for UK Government, public sector bodies, regulatory authorities, industry, and consumers.[1]

The science at the Institute cover six areas of interest, which are funded by the BBSRC under two strategic programmes, name 'Food and Health', and 'Gut Health and Food Safety'.[8]

The Institute of Food Research was ranked second in the world out of over 39,000 institutions for the impact of its research in the area of agricultural and food sciences over the previous ten years, according to an independent survey of published research papers released in 2009.[2][9][10]

Science in society[edit]

The IFR was one of the hosts for the British Association for the Advancement of Science (BA) Festival of Science, along with University of East Anglia and John Innes Centre in September 2006.

Directors[edit]

The current director is Professor Ian Charles, who was appointed in 2015 following the retirement of Professor David Boxer.[11] The previous directors were Professors David White, Alastair Robertson, Peter Schroeder, Alan Malcolm, Peter Belton, Doug Georgala CBE, and Frank Curtis.

IFR future[edit]

In 2018, research from the Institute for Food Research will transfer to and be incorporated in to the Quadram Institute (QI), a new national institute being constructed in partnership with the University of East Anglia and the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital.[12] On 28 April 2017, an application for the change of name on the Register of companies in England and Wales for company number 03009972 was filled by the Institute for Food Research. Its new registered name is the Quadram Institute Bioscience.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "Introducing IFR". IFR.ac.uk. Norwich: Institute of Food Research. Retrieved 21 June 2017. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h "A Short History of Food Research". IFR.ac.uk. Norwich: Institute of Food Research. Retrieved 21 June 2017. 
  3. ^ a b c "Companies House registration details for Company number 03009972". beta.CompaniesHouse.gov.uk. Companies House. Retrieved 21 June 2017. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f "Charity overview - The Institute of Food Research". CharityCommission.gov.uk. Charity Commission. Retrieved 20 June 2017. 
  5. ^ a b c d "IFR Management and Governance". IFR.ac.uk. Norwich: Institute of Food Research. Retrieved 21 June 2017. 
  6. ^ "Norwich Research Park - Partners". NorwichResearchPark.com. Norwich: Norwich Research Park. Retrieved 20 June 2017. 
  7. ^ "Strategically funded institutes - BBSRC". www.BBSRC.ac.uk. Swindon: Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC). Retrieved 20 June 2017. 
  8. ^ a b c d e f g "Research". IFR.ac.uk. Norwich: Institute of Food Research. Retrieved 21 June 2017. 
  9. ^ "Institute of Food Research 2nd in world ranking for impact of research publications". www.NorwichResearchPark.com. Norwich Research Park. 16 January 2009. Archived from the original on 22 October 2016. Retrieved 13 July 2016. 
  10. ^ "Essential Science Indicators". ThomsonReuters.com. Thomson Reuters. Archived from the original on 22 February 2009. [not in citation given]
  11. ^ "Director of ithree institute appointed to head new Centre for Food & Health | University of Technology Sydney". www.uts.edu.au. Retrieved 13 July 2016. 
  12. ^ Shields, Mark. "In pictures: First look at how Norwich’s £81m research centre will look". Retrieved 13 July 2016. 

External links[edit]