Iranian frigate Sahand (2012)

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History
Iran
Name: Sahand
Builder: Iran
Launched: 2012
Commissioned: 01 December 2018
Homeport: Bandar-Abbas
Identification: 74
Status: In active service
General characteristics
Class and type: Moudge-class frigate
Displacement: 1300 tons
Length: 95 meters but Super Structure
Installed power: 4 × modern diesel engine
Speed: Max 30 knots (56 km/h)
Complement: 140
Armament:
  • 1 × 76 mm (3 in) gun[1]
  • 2 × 20 mm anti-aircraft gun
  • 1 × Kamand 30mm CIWS guns
  • 2 × 8 tube Chaff Launcher
  • Sayyad-2[2]
  • 6 torpedoes
  • 4 × Qader missiles[3]
Aircraft carried: 1 × Bell-212 helicopter

Sahand, also known as Moudge 5, is an Iranian designed frigate of the Moudge class launched November 2012.[4] The vessel is able to fire and can be equipped with latest Iranian anti-ship missiles.[5] The warship added to Iran’s arsenal to ensure security in the Strait of Hormuz.[6]

History[edit]

Sahand was unveiled to the public in late November 2012. All that was shown was pictures of the completed hull and superstructure. The ship was not outfitted with weapons, electronics, or other essential military equipment. These systems were due to be installed in one or two years. The ship entered service on 01 December 2018.[7][8]

The Sahand has been equipped with a locally-manufactured point-defense weapon system dubbed ‘Kamand’. The Kamand close-in weapon system can destroy any target approaching the destroyer from a distance/altitude of two-four kilometers by firing between 4,000 and 7,000 rounds per minute. Sahand has also been furnished with anti-ship cruise missiles and a helicopter deck and enjoys electronic warfare systems.[9][10]

The ‘Sahand’ is said to have twice the defensive and offensive power of the Jamaran destroyer, with an upgraded torpedo tube, various types of anti-air and anti-surface weapons, surface-to-air and surface-to-surface missiles, and a point-defense system.

The Sahand is also equipped with an anti-submarine system and a stealth system, and enjoys a higher maneuverability and increased operational range. Sahand is equipped with four powerful engines, which is more than the number of engines of the Jamaran destroyer, and thus, is more advanced than Jamaran in terms of maneuvering performance.

The Sahand is also capable of sailing on turbulent waters and distant oceans for 150 days while accompanied by a support vessel.[11]

Sahand is named in the memory of original Sahand that was sunk by the U.S. in Operation Praying Mantis during the Iran–Iraq War on 18 April 1988.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Surface Forces: Homemade In Iran". Strategypage.com. 15 December 2012. Archived from the original on 5 March 2016. Retrieved 29 June 2015.
  2. ^ "Fars News Agency :: Commander: Navy Self-Sufficient in Production of Naval Tools, Equipments". swap.stanford.edu.
  3. ^ "New frigate joins Iranian navy - Jane's 360". www.janes.com. Archived from the original on 2018-12-05. Retrieved 2018-12-05.
  4. ^ آیا «ناوشکن سهند» به سواحل آمریکا می‌رود/ گام‌های قاطع و محکم ایران برای رادارگریزی (in Persian). Masregh News. Archived from the original on 15 May 2015. Retrieved 29 June 2015.
  5. ^ "Iran self-sufficient in defense sector: Navy cmdr". PressTV. 28 November 2012. Archived from the original on 20 April 2015. Retrieved 29 June 2015.
  6. ^ [1] Archived December 3, 2012, at the Wayback Machine
  7. ^ "Sahand Destroyer Joins Iran Navy Fleet - Defense news". Tasnim News Agency. Archived from the original on 2018-12-02. Retrieved 2018-12-01.
  8. ^ "Farsnews". en.farsnews.com. Archived from the original on 2018-12-02. Retrieved 2018-12-02.
  9. ^ "Sahand Destroyer Joins Iran Navy Fleet - Defense news". Tasnim News Agency. Archived from the original on 2018-12-02. Retrieved 2018-12-01.
  10. ^ "Farsnews". en.farsnews.com. Archived from the original on 2018-12-02. Retrieved 2018-12-02.
  11. ^ "'Sahand' destroyer joins Iran's naval fleet". Mehr News Agency. 1 December 2018. Archived from the original on 2 December 2018. Retrieved 2 December 2018.