It's the Dreamer in Me

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Sheet music cover, Leo Feist, New York, 1938.
1938 Decca 78 single, 1733B.

"It's the Dreamer in Me" is a 1938 song composed by Jimmy Dorsey and Jimmy Van Heusen, which was first recorded by Jimmy Dorsey and His Orchestra with Bob Eberly on vocals.[1] The song is a jazz and pop standard.

Jimmy Dorsey and His Orchestra released the song as a Decca 78, 1733B, Matrix # 63433, in 1938. The song was also featured in the 1938 Warnes Bros. movie short on Jimmy Dorsey and His Orchestra directed by Lloyd French and released on October 22, 1938.

Jimmy Dorsey composed the music. The lyrics were written by Jimmy Van Heusen.

Other recordings[edit]

The song has been recorded by Duke Ellington with Ivie Anderson on vocals, Benny Goodman with Martha Tilton on vocals, Sammy Kaye, Abe Lyman, Paul Whiteman, Count Basie, Bing Crosby, Harry James with Helen Humes on vocals, John Sheridan and His Dream Band with Rebecca Kilgore on vocals, and Scot Albertson. The Harry James recording of "It's the Dreamer in Me" reached no. 9 in 1938 on Billboard, staying on the charts for 3 weeks.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Stockdale, Robert L. Jimmy Dorsey: A Study in Contrasts. (Studies in Jazz Series). Lanham, MD: The Scarecrow Press, Inc., 1999.
  2. ^ "Song artist 32 - Jimmy Dorsey". Tsort.info. Retrieved 2015-06-20. 

Sources[edit]

  • Stockdale, Robert L. Jimmy Dorsey: A Study in Contrasts. (Studies in Jazz Series). Lanham, MD: The Scarecrow Press, Inc., 1999.
  • Arnold, Jay, ed. Jimmy Dorsey Saxophone Method: A School of Rhythmic Saxophone Playing. Warner Bros Pubns, 1999.
  • Sanford, Herb. Tommy and Jimmy: The Dorsey Years. (Introduction by Bing Crosby). DaCapo Press, 1980.
  • Bockemuehl, Eugene. On the Road with the Jimmy Dorsey Aggravation, 1947-1949. Gray Castle Press, 1996.
  • Metronome Magazine, March, 1942: Jimmy Dorsey cover. Metronome Editors. Vol. LVIII, No. 3.
  • Down Beat Magazine, October 21, 1946: Jimmy Dorsey and Paul Whiteman cover.

External links[edit]