Jason Latour

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Jason Latour
10.16.11JasonLatourByLuigiNovi1.jpg
at the 2011 New York Comic Con.
Born David Jason Latour
August 29, 1977
Charlotte, NC
Nationality American
Area(s) Writer, Artist
Notable works
Wolverine
Loose Ends
Winter Soldier
Django Unchained
BPRD: The Pickens County Horror
Southern Bastards
Spider-Gwen
Official website

David Jason Latour (born 1977) is an American comic book artist and writer known for his work for Image, Dark Horse, Marvel and DC comics on titles such as Wolverine, Winter Soldier, Southern Bastards and Spider-Gwen.

Early life[edit]

Jason Latour was born in Charlotte, NC and graduated from West Mecklenburg High School. He has a Bachelor's degree from East Carolina University where he also served as the student paper's head illustrator and cartoonist.[citation needed]

Career[edit]

Latour sketching at Heroes Con 2010

Latour minored in art at East Carolina University, graduating in 1999. While at ECU he began his first foray into the comics field with work on his creator owned humor comic strip "4 Seats Left".

In late 2004 Latour and writer B. Clay Moore created the short lived series The Expatriate at Image Comics. In 2009, he was hired to illustrate the Vertigo Comics Crime Line graphic novel Noche Roja with Simon Oliver, to be published in 2011, and has since worked as an artist on titles such as the 2010 Marvel miniseries Daredevil: Black & White,[1] Wolverine (2010)[2] and the critically acclaimed crime series Scalped (Vertigo 2010).[3] In 2011 his creator owned long form writing debut, Loose Ends (with artist Chris Brunner), was published by 12 Gauge Comics.[citation needed]

Bibliography[edit]

As artist[edit]

As writer[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Phillips, Dan. "Daredevil: Black and White #1 The Man of Fear gets the Black and White treatment." IGN. August 4, 2010
  2. ^ Melrose, Kevin. "Chain Reactions: Wolverine #1". Comic Book Resources. September 4, 2010
  3. ^ Hargro, Carlton. "Comic Review: Scalped No. 43". Creative Loafing Charlotte. November 30, 2010

References[edit]

External links[edit]