Jean Berthiaume

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Colonel (ret) Jean André Berthiaume
Nickname(s) "Johnnie"
"Papa Berthiaume" (Congo)
Born (1915-11-27)November 27, 1915
St-Hyacinthe, Quebec, Canada
Died January 26, 2003(2003-01-26) (aged 87)
St-Hyacinthe, Quebec, Canada
Allegiance Canada
Service/branch Canadian Forces
Years of service 1936–1969
1990–1993
Rank Colonel
Commands held 1er Royal 22e Régiment
Quebec Western District
Farnham Army cadet camp
Battles/wars World War II
ONUC
Awards Officer of the Order of the British Empire
Knight of the Venerable Order of St. John
Canadian Forces Decoration

Joseph André Horace Jean Berthiaume, OBE, CD (November 27, 1915 – January 26, 2003) was a Canadian Army officer who served with the Régiment de St-Hyacinthe, the Royal Canadian Infantry Corps and the Royal 22e Régiment.

Early Education[edit]

Jean André Berthiaume was born on November 27, 1915, in St-Hyacinthe, Quebec. He studied at the Séminaire de St-Hyacinthe, where he earned a degree in letters and arts. He then pursued another degree at the Université de Montréal, where he got a degree in chemistry.

Before the War[edit]

At the same time his father was serving at the Regiment, Jean Berthiaume enlisted with the 84th Régiment de St-Hyacinthe in 1936. There completed his basic training as a private and rose to the rank of sergeant. Later got his officer commission and promoted to Lieutenant.

He married Mme Denise Lapierre on April 14, 1940, at the St-Hyacinthe Cathedral.

World War II[edit]

As the war broke out, then Lieutenant Berthiaume continued training his troops in St-Hyacinthe. He got transferred to the 4th Canadian Armoured Brigade at camp Debert in Nova Scotia for preparatory training as GSO with the 7th Canadian Infantry Brigade. He then goes to the Canadian Army Command and Staff College in Kingston and after shipped to England. Most of the Canadians in reinforcement stayed in England for almost 2 years (1942–1944) until D-Day. When arriving in France, as GSO 3 Operations,[1] then captain Berthiaume aided in the orientation of some operations towards the ultimate victory. By the end of the conflict, he was later transferred to the 1st Canadian Infantry Division.

After the war[edit]

On April 26, 1946, then captain Berthiaume was posted to NDHQ as GSO 2 and the next day promoted to the rank of Temporary major (T/maj). On November 22, 1947,[2] he was received to the rank of major.[3]

After 3 years in Ottawa, then major Berthiaume went to the Canadian Army Training School in St-Jean, Quebec, in 1949. He managed the Canadian Army Training School in St-Jean[4] before it was transferred to Valcartier in 1952.

He then stayed and contributed in the building of the Collège militaire royal de Saint-Jean as Director of Administration. An uncommon event occurred a few days after 1952 Christmas, The child of one of the CMR's staff fell into the icy waters of the Richelieu river. Upon hearing the child's cry for help, the CMR commandant, colonel Lahaie went on the ice to rescue the boy, assisted by Capt Gosselin and Major Berthiaume. Others came along as the alarm was sounded. They were all pulled to safety and taken care of, the child saved.[5]

Major Berthiaume left St-Jean for Valcartier in 1953 and went to the 2nd Battalion Royal 22e Régiment as deputy commander. No time to lay around, he packs the battalion and heads for Germany as Canada's NATO infantry contribution.[6] After setting up over with the 4th Canadian Infantry Brigade, he still is very involved within the military community like in the celebrations of the 10th anniversary of Normandy where he commanded the Canadian group during the weekend long celebrations.[7] In July 1954, he got promoted to the rank of lieutenant-colonel and was chosen as the Canadian representative at the SHAPE in Paris for a year.[8] Back in Canada, Lcol Berthiaume in 1957, took command of the 1st battalion Royal 22e Régiment until 1960. He was a true gentleman in sharing the warm French-Canadian culture as host of many social functions at the Citadelle.[9][10]

Leaving Quebec in early summer of 1960, LCol Berthiaume was flown to work with the UNTSO in Palestine. Soon after in July 1960,[11] he headed to Congo as a United Nation chief of staff of the ONUC[12] contingent.[13][14][15][16][17][18][19][20]

Back in Canada, He went to serve as Adjutant general at the Quebec Command HQ. Promoted to the rank of colonel, he commanded the Quebec Western District[21][22] until his retirement in 1969. During those years, he commanded the Royal Army Cadet Camp of Farnham that closed in 1967.[23]

Civilian life[edit]

Upon leaving the service in 1969, Colonel(ret) Berthiaume goes to work for the Wabasso company[24][25] in Trois-Rivières, Quebec as Director of Operations Services until his retirement in 1980. During those years, he gets involved with the Canadian Manufacturers Association as president of the St. Maurice chapter.[26][27]

Colonel(ret) Berthiaume was a member of the Royal Canadian Legion, Branch #2 of St-Hyacinthe with which he was devoted in many aspects.

As we can relate to a gardener who seeded, Colonel Berthiaume continue his involvement and contribution to the Collège militaire royal de Saint-Jean throughout the years.[28] He always proved a good golf player at the annual benefit golf tournament and other activities.[29]

In St-Hyacinthe, He was a devoted contributor to the Honoré-Mercier hospital's foundation.

Army cadets[edit]

During the final years of his active career, Colonel Berthiaume commanded the Royal Army Cadet Camp of Farnham that closed in 1967.

He was particularly close to the Army Cadets Corps No.1 from his home town. In the mid-1990s, he donated several musical instruments to found a band created for children to play in. Organizers agreed to call it "La musique J. A. Berthiaume."

Honours[edit]

After World War 2, Jean Berthiaume received the MID for his outstanding services.[30][31]

For his devotion in the creation of the CMR St-Jean, Colonel Berthiaume was given an honorary college number: H12878.

Colonel J. A. Berthiaume was invested into the Order of the British Empire in 1962 for his impressive organizational skills, initiative, linguistic ability, unmatched negotiating skills and his bravery during the ONUC mission in Congo.[32][33] He was the first Canadian officer to be given that recognition since the Korean War.

In 1969 he was nominated in the Most Venerable Order of the Hospital of St John of Jerusalem as Officier.[34] Later in 1977, he was promoted to Knight of the Order.[35]

The city of St-Hyacinthe consecrated one if its street name in his memory in 2006.[36]

Last Post[edit]

Headstone of Col J. A. Berthiaume and his wife Denise Lapierre in St-Hyacinthe

In St-Hyacinthe in 2003 after his last short battle with a secretly kept illness, Colonel (retired) Jean André Berthiaume was laid to rest in St-Hyacinthe, with full military honours. His wife Denise died in 2010.[37][38]

Books[edit]

Books in which colonel Berthiaume has either contributed to or is mentioned in include:

  • Canada, the Congo Crisis, and UN Peacekeeping, 1960–64[39]
  • Pearson's Peacekeepers: Canada and the United Nations Emergency Force, 1956-67[40]
  • Le Canada dans les guerres en Afrique centrale: génocides et pillages des ressources minières du Congo par le Rwanda interposé[41]
  • Le Collège militaire Royal de Saint-Jean, Une université à caractère différent[42]
  • Canadian Defence Quarterly, Volume 22[43]
  • In the eye of the storm: a history of Canadian peacekeeping[44]
  • Biographies canadiennes-françaises[45]
  • Uncertain mandate; politics of the U.N. Congo operation[46]
  • De Rivière-de-la-Paix au maintien de la paix: les batailles d'un Franco Albertain[47]
  • Chronique de politique étrangère, Volume 14[48]
  • Evolution de la crise congolaise de septembre 1960 à avril 1961[49]
  • Revue générale pour l'humaniste des temps nouveaux[50]
  • United Nations Peacekeeping, 1946-1967[51]
  • Soldiering for Peace[52]
  • Canadian House of Commons Debates, Official Report, Volume 7[53]
Military offices
Preceded by
None
Director of Administration of the Collège militaire royal de St-Jean
1952–1953
Succeeded by
Maj J.L. Lessard, CD
Preceded by
Lcol (Mgén) B. J. Guimond, CD
Commander of the 1st Battalion Royal 22e Régiment
1957–1960
Succeeded by
Lcol (Col) P. E. Chassé, MBE, CD
Preceded by
Commander Farnham Army Cadet Camp
1964–1967
Succeeded by
None
Preceded by
Commander Quebec Western District
1964–1968
Succeeded by
Preceded by
Lcol(h) D. Chartier, CD
Honorary Colonel of the 6e Battalion Royal 22e Régiment
1990–1993
Succeeded by
Lcol(h) J. A. G. Roberge

References[edit]

  1. ^ Caravaggio, Angelo N. (2009). Commanding the Green Centre Line in Normandy: A Case Study of Division Command in the Second World War. Canada: Wilfrid Laurier University. p. 502. 
  2. ^ Berthiaume, Jean. "Nominations, Promotions and postings". Gazette of Canada. Government of Canada. 
  3. ^ "Appointments, Promotions and Retirements - The Canadian Army". The Canada Gazette. Retrieved 15 May 2013. 
  4. ^ "Problems Affecting French-Speaking Representation in the Post War Canadian Army" (PDF). Report 81. Army Headquarters. Retrieved 20 Feb 1959.  Check date values in: |accessdate= (help)
  5. ^ "College Commandant risks life to save child". The News and the Eastern township advocate. 31 December 1952. Retrieved 15 May 2013. 
  6. ^ Berthiuame, J. A. (7 Oct 1953). "300 Van Doos sail today for NATO duty". Quebec Chronicle-Telegraph. Retrieved 14 May 2013. 
  7. ^ Press, Canadian (1 June 1954). "To Commemorate Normandy Invasion". Lethbridge Herald. Retrieved 17 May 2013. 
  8. ^ "NATO Representative". Winnipeg Free Press. 5 June 1954. Retrieved 17 May 2013. 
  9. ^ Cabell, General C. P. "Letter to Lt. Colonel J. A. Berthiaune from C. P. Cabell" (PDF). CIA Archives. Retrieved 16 May 2013. 
  10. ^ Clarke, John M. "Letter to Lt. Colonel J. A. Berthiaume from John M." (PDF). CIA Archives. Retrieved 16 May 2013. 
  11. ^ "Memorandum from Secretary of State for External Affairs to Cabinet". CABINET DOCUMENT NO. 226-60. Government of Canada. Retrieved 24 May 2013. 
  12. ^ "United Nations Operation in the Congo". Retrieved 15 May 2013. 
  13. ^ Ryan, Nigel (16 July 1960). "Congo Breathes easier as U.N. troops arrives". The Daily News, St. John's NFLD. Retrieved 23 Sep 2014. 
  14. ^ Berthiaume, Lt.-Col. Jean (29 July 1960). "Success in Sending Men and Supplies Into Roadless Interior Pleases Aides Who Had No Time to Make Plans". The NewYork Times. Retrieved 14 May 2013. 
  15. ^ Canadian, Press (24 Aug 1960). "Canadian gets leave from Congo". Montreal Gazette. Retrieved 14 May 2013. 
  16. ^ Berthiaume, Lt.-Col. Jean (26 Aug 1960). "Believes Canadians Are in No Danger". Saskatoon Star-Phoenix. Retrieved 14 May 2013. 
  17. ^ Berthiaume, Lt.-Col Jean (2 Dec 1960). "Canadians Beaten up Says UN". Saskatoon Star-Phoenix. Retrieved 14 May 2013. 
  18. ^ Berthiaume, Col. (6 Mar 1961). "Col. Berthiaume ends tour of duty in Congo". Saskatoon Star-Phoenix. Retrieved 14 May 2013. 
  19. ^ McRobb, Robby (30 November 2011). ""The Congo" will we or won't we?". The Guardian (PEI). Retrieved 15 May 2013. 
  20. ^ Granatstein, J.L. (2010). Pearson's Peacekeepers: Canada and the United Nations Emergency Force, 1956-67. Canda: Literary Review of Canada. p. 254. ISBN 9780774815826. 
  21. ^ Berthiaume, Col. J. A. (23 June 1966). "T.C. 48 Officers Association Holds Successful "Back Home" Reunion". The News and Eastern Township Advocate. Retrieved 14 May 2013. 
  22. ^ Berthiaume, Col J A. (11 May 1967). "Local soldiers on winning militia team". South Shore News. Retrieved 14 May 2013. 
  23. ^ "Army Cadet Camp Farnham 1967 Year book". Retrieved 15 May 2013. 
  24. ^ Textile Industries, Volume 139. Canada: W. R. C. Smith Publishing Company. 1975. 
  25. ^ Textile Industries, Volume 140. Canada: W. R. C. Smith Publishing Company. 1976. 
  26. ^ Berthiaume, J. A. (22 April 1970). "Welcome National President". The Shawinigan Standard. Retrieved 14 May 2013. 
  27. ^ Berthiaume, Col. Jean (30 Sep 1970). "U.C.W Annual St. Maurice Meeting". The Shawinigan Standard. Retrieved 14 May 2013. 
  28. ^ "Classe d'entrée 1952". Retrieved 14 May 2013. 
  29. ^ "Fondation des anciens du CMR". Retrieved 14 May 2013. 
  30. ^ Berthiaume, Jean André. "Mention in Dispatches". Archives Canada. Government of Canada. Retrieved 11 May 2013. 
  31. ^ Debates - House of commons. Canada: Queen's Printer. 1946. 
  32. ^ "Central Chancery of the Orders of Knighthood" (PDF). London Gazette. Retrieved 15 May 2013. 
  33. ^ Berthiaume, Lt.-Col. Jean A. (16 June 1962). "OBE Given Army Officer for Congo Work with UN". Montreal Gazette. Retrieved 14 May 2013. 
  34. ^ Berthiaume, J. A. "appointments to The Most Venerable Order of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem" (PDF). The London Gazette. The London Gazette. Retrieved 13 May 2013. 
  35. ^ Berthiaume, Jean andré. "The Most Venerable Order of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem Appointments" (PDF). The London Gazette. The London Gazette. Retrieved 13 May 2013. 
  36. ^ "Commission de toponymie". Impasse J.-A.-Berthiaume. Gouvernement du Québec. Retrieved 16 May 2013. 
  37. ^ Berthiaume, Jean André. "Avis de Décès - Jean André Berthiaume". Fédération québécoise des sociétés de généalogie. Retrieved 14 May 2013. 
  38. ^ Lapierre, Denise. "Avis de Décès - Denise Lapierre". Fédération québécoise des sociétés de généalogie. Retrieved 14 May 2013. 
  39. ^ Spooner, Kevin A. (2009). Canada, the Congo Crisis, and UN Peacekeeping, 1960-64 (PDF). Canada: U of BC Press. ISBN 978-0-7748-1636-6. 
  40. ^ Granatstein, J.L. (2010). Pearson's Peacekeepers: Canada and the United Nations Emergency Force, 1956-67. Canda: Literary Review of Canada. p. 254. ISBN 9780774815826. 
  41. ^ MBEKO, PATRICK (2012). Le Canada dans les guerres en Afrique centrale: génocides et pillages des ressources minières du Congo par le Rwanda interposé. Congo: Le Nègre éditeur. p. 688. ISBN 978-2918278085. 
  42. ^ Castonguay, Jacques (1992). Le Collège militaire Royal de Saint-Jean Une université à caractère différent. Canada: Septentrion. p. 272. ISBN 9782921114783. 
  43. ^ Canadian Defence Quarterly. Canada: Defence Publications. 1992. pp. 13–14–15. 
  44. ^ Gaffen, Fred (1987). In the eye of the storm: a history of Canadian peacekeeping. Canada: Deneau & Wayne. p. 302. ISBN 0-88879-158-5. 
  45. ^ Fortier, J.-Albert (1965). Biographies canadiennes-françaises. Canada: Editions biographiques canadiennes-françaises. 
  46. ^ Lefever, Ernest W. (1967). Uncertain mandate; politics of the U.N. Congo operation. USA: Johns Hopkins Press. p. 254. ISBN 978-0801803666. 
  47. ^ Pariseau, Jean (2000). De Rivière-de-la-Paix au maintien de la paix: les batailles d'un Franco Albertain. Canada. p. 241. 
  48. ^ Chronique de politique étrangère, Volume 14. Belgique: Institut royal des relations internationales. 1961. 
  49. ^ Evolution de la crise congolaise de septembre 1960 à avril 1961. Belgique: Institut royal des relations internationales. 1961. p. 596. 
  50. ^ Revue générale pour l'humaniste des temps nouveaux. Belgique. 1984. 
  51. ^ Higgins, Rosalyn (1980). United Nations Peacekeeping, 1946-1967. USA: Oxford University Press. p. 472. 
  52. ^ Horn, Major General Carl von (1967). Soldiering for Peace. D. McKay. p. 402. 
  53. ^ House of Commons Debates, Official Report, Volume 7. Canada: Queen's Printer. 1960.