John A. Danaher

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John A. Danaher
John A. Danaher.jpg
Senior Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit
In office
January 22, 1969 – September 22, 1990
Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit
In office
October 1, 1953 – January 22, 1969
Appointed byDwight D. Eisenhower
Preceded byJames McPherson Proctor
Succeeded byRoger Robb
United States Senator
from Connecticut
In office
January 3, 1939 – January 3, 1945
Preceded byAugustine Lonergan
Succeeded byBrien McMahon
Secretary of the State of Connecticut
In office
1933–1935
GovernorWilbur Lucius Cross
Preceded byWilliam L. Higgins
Succeeded byC. John Satti
Personal details
Born
John Anthony Danaher

(1899-01-09)January 9, 1899
Meriden, Connecticut
DiedSeptember 22, 1990(1990-09-22) (aged 91)
West Hartford, Connecticut
Resting placeSacred Heart Cemetery
Meriden, Connecticut
Political partyRepublican
ChildrenJohn A. Danaher III
ResidenceWest Hartford, Connecticut
EducationYale University (A.B.)
Yale Law School

John Anthony Danaher (January 9, 1899 – September 22, 1990) was a United States Senator from Connecticut and a United States Circuit Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit.

Education and career[edit]

Born on January 9, 1899, in Meriden, New Haven County, Connecticut, Danaher attended the local schools. He received an Artium Baccalaureus degree in 1920 from Yale University and then attended Yale Law School, serving as a lieutenant in the United States Army in 1918 as a member of the Student's Army Training Corps and in the Officers' Reserve Corps. He was admitted to the bar in 1922. He entered private practice in Hartford, Connecticut and later Washington, D.C. from 1922 to 1953. He served as an Assistant United States Attorney for the District of Connecticut from 1922 to 1934. He was Secretary of State for the State of Connecticut and a member of the State Board of Finance and Control from 1933 to 1935. He was a Republican United States Senator from Connecticut from January 3, 1939 to January 3, 1945, and was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1944. He was counsel to the National Republican Senatorial Committee from 1946 to 1953.[1][2]

Federal judicial service[edit]

Danaher received a recess appointment from President Dwight D. Eisenhower on October 1, 1953, to a seat on the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit vacated by Judge James McPherson Proctor, taking the oath of office on November 20, 1953. He was nominated to the same position by President Eisenhower on January 11, 1954. He was confirmed by the United States Senate on March 30, 1954, and received his commission on March 31, 1954. He assumed senior status on January 22, 1969. After taking senior status, he served part time with the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. He took inactive senior status in 1980. His service terminated on September 22, 1990, due to his death in West Hartford, Connecticut, where he had resided since 1969. He was interred at the Sacred Heart Cemetery in Meriden.[1][2]

Family[edit]

Danher's grandson, John A. Danaher III, is a Superior Court Judge who currently sits in Litchfield, Connecticut.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b John Anthony Danaher at the Biographical Directory of Federal Judges, a public domain publication of the Federal Judicial Center.
  2. ^ a b United States Congress. "John A. Danaher (id: D000025)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.

Sources[edit]

Political offices
Preceded by
William L. Higgins
Secretary of the State of Connecticut
1933–1935
Succeeded by
C. John Satti
U.S. Senate
Preceded by
Augustine Lonergan
U.S. Senator (Class 3) from Connecticut
1939–1945
Served alongside: Francis T. Maloney
Succeeded by
Brien McMahon
Legal offices
Preceded by
James McPherson Proctor
Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit
1953–1969
Succeeded by
Roger Robb
Honorary titles
Preceded by
Claude Pepper
Most Senior Living United States Senator
(Sitting or Former)

1989–1990
Succeeded by
Happy Chandler