Joyce Scott

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Joyce Scott
FRSASA
Joyce Ellen Scott.JPG
Born Joyce Ellen Mottershead
(1942-12-04)December 4, 1942
Nationality Australian
Education BEd, GradDipEd(Art), DipDesign(Ceramics)
Known for Ceramics, Painting, Drawing
Notable work In the National Gallery of Australia Collection
Awards 3 International, 2 Australian

Joyce Scott FRSASA [1] is an Australian artist working in drawing, oil painting and ceramics. She has held ten independent exhibitions, is represented internationally and has received five awards. Scott, née Mottershead, was born in Poynton, Cheshire, England and migrated with her family to Adelaide, South Australia in 1951.

Highlights[edit]

Joyce Scott studied ceramics ‘in the early 1970s under the tutelage of Milton Moon, a dynamic teacher’.[2] She received a Diploma of Design, Ceramics and a Graduate Diploma of Education (Art) from the Adelaide College of Art, and later qualified for a Bachelor of Education from the South Australian College of Advanced Education. In 1976, Scott was made a Fellow of the Royal South Australian Society of Arts.[3]

Whirl Wind A hand built ceramic sculpture, 58cm height, fired to 1140°C. Potter's Mark top-left.

A long running relationship between the artist and Greenhill Galleries commenced with her first exhibition in 1974. Art Critic Ivor Frances reported in a newspaper review, Pottery is Exciting, that ‘The [exhibition] pottery is large and sculptural, subtly coloured in harmonious glazes .. Joyce Scott has overcome many of the firing problems which occur in making large, light ceramic articles .. [and] the glazes crawl and break into fractured earth colours, browns and greens, all over the surface.’[4]

Kenneth Hood, judge of the 1974 Carillion City Festival Ceramics Award, said ‘Joyce Scott was clearly a potter of major talent’.[5] In awarding her first prize, Hood, the then Curator of Decorative Arts and Senior Curator at the National Gallery of Victoria, said Scott’s work ‘.. manages to combine a feeling of massiveness with a sense of lightness, even elegance, and the combination of the two is exceedingly satisfying .. The pot springs up from its small base and its almost circular contour is modified and altered in one or two places in the most subtle way. The whole pot was covered with a glaze which has considerable variation of tone and colour’.[5] He describe the work as of ‘exceptional quality’.

As a young artist and teacher, Scott was engaged in the political transformations of the 1970s. The United Nations declared 1975 to be International Women’s Year, with conferences and celebrations held worldwide, including a broad programme of events in Adelaide, South Australia. As part those activities, Scott participated in an exhibition of women artists held at the Adelaide Festival Centre.

Joyce Scott photographing a Dragon Kiln (龙窑) in Shiwan, Guangdong, China. Photograph taken by Diplomat Geoffrey Evan Marginson during an Australian Pottery Delegation in September 1975.

Later that year, Scott took part in a delegation of Australian potters[6] as guests of the People's Republic of China. The party of 10, led by Australian Potter Ivan McMeekin[7] and accompanied by Diplomat Geoffrey Marginson, spent 35 days studying pottery techniques in urban and regional settings. This delegation formed part of cultural exchanges consequent to the opening of diplomatic relations between the two countries in 1972.

Scott held her first major exhibition outside her home state at Solander Gallery, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory. Rowland Richardson, Head, North Adelaide School of Art, reviewed the opening in the Spring 1978 edition of Pottery in Australia. He wrote that ‘The forms are mainly hand built with dry or matt “earth” glazes sprayed on. The sun, usually seen as a negative form, is often surrounded with a lattice of clay depicting the shimmering, radiating heat. A sun which bakes dry the landscape, but is still very much at the centre of it. However, the more recent work has a totemic feel to it. It is stronger, more geometric, and is decorated with a formal engobe pattern. [Joyce Scott] is a thoroughly professional artist, sketching a lot, determinedly independent and unaffected by fashions. I believe she is one of the few ceramic artists who have been able to imbue their work with a uniquely Australian feel.’[8]

As part of an ongoing relationship with the political left, in the early 1980s Scott donated artwork to exhibition fundraisers of the Australian Labor Party. A personal letter of appreciation[9] from the then Leader of the Opposition, John Bannon, records her contribution.

Later, in 1983, Bannon, now Premier of South Australia, opened an exhibition of Scott’s ceramics at Bonython Art Gallery.[10] This exhibition was reviewed by Stephen Skillitzi in the Spring ’83 edition of S.A. Crafts. Skillitzi, the Lecturer in Charge of Ceramics at the South Australia School of Art at the time, praised ‘The intrinsic warmth and richness of clay, amber and black oxides, and white glaze are fused into composites that are bold in their simplicity and yet rich in their delicate detail of applied brushed and incised textural patterns and line and soft torn clay slab additions.’[11] After surveying a number of individual artworks, Skillitzi concluded ‘These strongly conceived yet delicately executed and cogent statements in stoneware underline Joyce Scott’s gradual refinement and maturation into a ceramic artist with significant vision.’

Richard Albert Mottershead Pencil on cartridge paper, 70cm x 48cm.

Wild Grass was the title of Scott’s first drawing exhibition. A review of the exhibition by the prominent art critic Neville Weston in The Advertiser newspaper said ‘Joyce Scott’s [1985 drawing] exhibition at Greenhill Galleries .. suggests that the landscape feel, which has always been a strong feature of her ceramics, is no longer pot bound … it is an exciting exhibition.’[12] In correspondence to the artist about the exhibits, Australian painter and 'master of contemporary landscape'[13] Geoff Wilson[14] magnanimously observed 'you show the same fascinating ease with your drawings as with your ceramics. I wouldn't dare tackle such complex subjects.'[15] He further commends Scott on the 'rewarding success' of selling all exhibited works.

During the late 1980s and early 1990s Scott lectured in the School of Art and Design Education at the University of South Australia.[16] She coordinated Units in Sculpture, Clay, Glaze Technology, Visual Research and Core Studies across all years of the Graduate Programme.[17]

‘In 1986 and ’89 her work gained international recognition, and among her achievements she received two Honourable Mentions in the form of certificates presented for outstanding achievement at [both] the First and Second International Ceramics Contests in Nagoya, [Mino], Japan. Her work has since been acquired by a number of state and international art museums’ said Dr Noris Ioannou.[18] Japanese pottery and porcelain is acknowledged as the world’s finest and Scott amplified her international recognition with an Honorable Certificate, Silver Prize[19] at the 1988 International Pottery Exhibition of The Japanese Pottery Association, Tokyo.

The August 1989 edition of Craft Arts International was fronted by Scott’s work and carried a four-page feature article on her ceramics by Dr Doug Boughton, the then Head of the School of Art and Design Education, South Australian College of Advanced Education. Boughton described ‘Each piece [as] uncompromising in its “earthiness”, a feeling created through the glowing warmth of the earth reds, burnt oranges, and yellow ochres which appear to shimmer across the surfaces almost like the illusion of a mirage on a desert landscape. Stain and glaze are used on clay with a sensitivity and authority that would seem to be more the province of a painter than a ceramist. It is not a surprise that Joyce Scott regards the flat areas of her pieces as a “canvas of clay” on which she works her magic with variations of tone and intensity of hue.’[2] Boughton quoted the artist as saying: “I am endeavouring to produce a series of forms and images influenced and inspired by the Australian landscape. I want to celebrate the vitality of the land, and uncover a different reality. This involves a two-way vision, looking outward, and looking inward at the essence of life.’’’

The artist's graphical signature incised into clay
Potter's Mark

The 1995 edition of Craft Arts International published a second feature article on Scott by historian and freelance writer Dr Noris Ioannou. In this article, entitled Eye of the Sun, Dr Ioannou said ‘Scott‘s work is a joyous celebration of sun, life and the fecundity of the South Australian Landscape. Her large, abstracted, slab-built vessels seem to rise from a primeval base to suggest stylised natural terrain; alternatively, the forms suggest microcosmic views of the placental womb. Whatever the imagery implies, the central idea is that of birth, regeneration, and fertility.’[18] He continued ‘Underpinning her evocative imagery is the concept of containment, as symbolised by the principal form of her work, the vessel. For Scott, the vessel represents the earth, the timelessness of nature and the heavens. The metaphor of the vessel as the earth also extends to its representation of human life, both individual and collective. Earth, material culture, and human life are therefore interlinked and symbolised through the fired clay vessel. As such, Scott, through her ceramic sculptures, is essentially exploring the universal human condition. Above all, however, it is the balance of this fragile planet — both the life on it, as well as the inner equilibrium which each and every person seeks to achieve - that she especially seeks to symbolise in her new sculptures.’

Awards[edit]

1974 First prize Adelaide University Union Bookshop
1974 First prize [5][20] Bathurst Carillion City Festival, NSW
1986 Honorable Mention [21] for outstanding achievement First International Ceramics Contest, Mino, Japan [22]
1988 Honorable Certificate, Silver Prize [19] and plague [23] 1988 International Pottery Exhibition,
The Japanese Pottery Association, Tokyo
1989 Honorable Mention [24] for outstanding achievement Second International Ceramics Competition, Mino, Japan [22]

Represented[edit]

Scott's work is represented in the:

Exhibitions[edit]

caption
Fallow Fields A hand built ceramic sculpture, 45cm height, fired to 1140°C. Potter's Mark top-left.

Independent[edit]

Between 1974 and 1993, Scott held nine ceramics exhibitions:

In 1985 she presented Wild Grass,[12][58] an exhibition of drawing at Greenhill Galleries, SA, opened by Dr John Skull, Dean, SACAE.

Group[edit]

Joyce Scott has exhibited in numerous invitation exhibitions in all Australian States. These include:

Publications[edit]

International[edit]

Contemplation Oil painting, 61cm x 92cm, 2015.
  • The Masters of Modern Ceramics 1986, Faenza, Italy [80]
  • La Ceramica Moderna, Italy, 1987 [81]
  • Heat Wave, ʼ88 International Pottery Exhibition, Tokyo [82]
  • 2a Biennale Internazionale Di Ceramica Contemporanae [83]
  • Ceramic Landscapes, Crafts Arts International, 1989 [2][84]
  • Whirl Wind, 2nd International Ceramics Competition, Mino, Japan, 1989 [85]
  • Eye of the Sun, Crafts Arts International, 1995 [18][86]

Australian[edit]

  • Pottery in Australia:
    • Greenhill Galleries, 1974 [87]
    • Festival of Arts Exhibition, 1976 [88]
    • Solandar Gallery, 1978 [8]
    • Night Eclipse, 1980 [89]
    • Daybreak, 1980 [90]
    • Festival Craft Exhibition, 1982 [60]
    • Bonython Exhibition, 1983 [91]
    • Olive Earth, 1987 [92]
    • Greenhill Galleries, 1987 [93]
    • Capturing the Wonder of Nature's Lifecycle, 1995 [94]
  • Force Intensified, Australian Crafts, 1977 [27]
  • Artists and Galleries of Australia and New Zealand, 1979 [95]
  • Potters' Directory & Information Book, 1981 [96]
  • Cameo Reflections, S.A. Crafts, 1983 [11]
  • Clay Statements, Australian Contemporary Ceramics, 1985 [97]
  • Craft Australia: year book 1984 [98]
  • Ceramics in South Australia 1836-1986, from Folk to Studio Pottery, 1986[99]
  • Adelaide Festival of Arts ʼ88, Art and Australia, 1987 [100]
  • International Mino Exhibition, Japan, Craft Australia, 1987 [101]
  • South Australian Ceramic Inglewood Award 1988 [102]
  • Craft Arts Maganize, Annual Buyers' Guide Supplement 1988-89 [103]
  • Artfile, 1992 [104]
  • Kalori, Royal South Australian Society of Arts, 2016, Cover page and feature article [105][106]
  • Members Sketchbook II, Royal South Australian Society of Arts, 2016, Two page survey [107]
  • A Visual History: The Royal South Australian Society of Arts, 1856-2016, Volume One [108][109]


External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Fellow, South Australian Royal Society of Arts". 
  2. ^ a b c Dr Boughton, Doug (August–October 1989), "Ceramic Landscapes", Crafts Arts International, Craft-Art Pty Ltd, 16: front page, 65–68, ISSN 1038-846X 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h "Royal South Australian Society of Arts". 
  4. ^ a b Frances, Ivor (24 April 1974), "POTTERY IS EXITING", The Advertiser, News Ltd, ISSN 1039-4192 
  5. ^ a b c d "Pottery Fastest Growing Art", Western Advocate, FairFax Regional Media, September 1974, ISSN 1328-3790 
  6. ^ "Bound for China", The Advertiser, News Ltd, 26 July 1975, ISSN 1039-4192 
  7. ^ "Ivan McMeekin, Design & Art Australia Online". 
  8. ^ a b c "Joyce Scott, Solandar Gallery, September 22-October 8, Canberra", Pottery in Australia, The Potters' Society of Australia, 17 (2): 60, Spring 1978, ISSN 0048-4954 
  9. ^ "Letter of appreciation from John Bannon to Joyce Scott for artworks donated to the Australian Labor Party". 
  10. ^ a b "Exhibition Invitation Card, Bonython Gallery, SA, 1983". 
  11. ^ a b "Joyce Scott, Cameo Reflections", S.A. Crafts, Special Ceramics Conference Edition, Craft Council of South Australia Inc, 25: 41, Spring 1983, ISSN 0157-3667 
  12. ^ a b Western, Neville (23 July 1985), "A noted architectural presence", The Advertiser, News Ltd, ISSN 1039-4192 
  13. ^ "Geoff Wilson: Interrogated Landscape, Australian Broadcasting Commission". 
  14. ^ "Geoff Wilson". 
  15. ^ "Geoff Wilson correspondence, 1985". 
  16. ^ The South Australian College of Advanced Education became the University of South Australia during this period. Scott lectured at both.
  17. ^ "Joyce Scott, Appointment Letter, University of South Australia". 
  18. ^ a b c Dr Ioannou, Noris (1995), "Eye of the Sun", Crafts Arts International, Craft-Art Pty Ltd, 34: 44–46, ISSN 1038-846X 
  19. ^ a b "Honorable Certificate, Silver Prize, '88 International Pottery Exhibition, Japan Pottery Association". 
  20. ^ "Carillon City Festival Art Award 1974". 
  21. ^ "Honorable Mention, 1st International Ceramics Contest, Mino, Japan, 1986". 
  22. ^ a b "International Ceramics Festival, Mino, Japan". 
  23. ^ "Plague for Silver Prize, '88 International Pottery Exhibition, Japan Pottery Association". 
  24. ^ "Honorable Mention, 2nd International Ceramics Competition, Mino, Japan, 1989". 
  25. ^ "Force Intensified, ArtSearch, National Gallery of Australia". 
  26. ^ "A letter from the Australian National Gallery to Joyce Scott confirming that the Gallery holds her work". 
  27. ^ a b c "Joyce Scott, Force Intensified, 1977", Australian Crafts, A survey of recent work, Craft Council of Australia, 25 (2): 38, Summer 1978, ISSN 0004-301X 
  28. ^ The Australian Craft Board touring exhibition, Australian Crafts, was acquired by the National Gallery of Australia in 1980
  29. ^ "Centre for Australian Art, From the National Gallery Collection". 
  30. ^ "Acquisition Confirmation Email, Rockhampton Art Gallery, 1986" (PDF). 
  31. ^ "Rockhampton Art Gallery, Rockhampton, Queensland, Australia". 
  32. ^ "Shaping Spirit, Gallery Catalogue, Bathurst Regional Art Gallery". 
  33. ^ "Confirmation Email, From Max Lyle via Dr Gregory Ramsay" (PDF). 
  34. ^ "Acquisition Receipt, Artbank, 1983". 
  35. ^ "Bunbury Regional Art Galleries, Bunbury, Western Australia". 
  36. ^ "Museum of Contemporary Ceramics, Grottaglia, Italy". 
  37. ^ "Record of Joyce Scott artwork held in the South Australian Studio Potters Collection". 
  38. ^ "Acquisition Receipt, Adelaide Hyatt Regency, 1988". 
  39. ^ "Exhibition Invitation Card, Greenhill Galleries, SA, 1974". 
  40. ^ "Greenhill Galleries, Adelaide, South Australia". 
  41. ^ Murray-Harvey, Nigel (22 March 1976), "Inspired by the French Revolution", The Advertiser, News Ltd, ISSN 1039-4192 
  42. ^ "Greenhill Galleries Exhibitions, National Gallery of Australia Research Library". 
  43. ^ Hinchliffe, Meredith (September 1978), "With inner strength", The Canberra Times, FairFax Media, ISSN 0157-6925 
  44. ^ "Solander Galleries, Yarralumla, Australian Capital Territory, Australia". 
  45. ^ "Art Exhibitions and Collections, Fringe Vault, 1980, Adelaide Fringe Inc". 
  46. ^ "Exhibition Pamphlet, Greenhill Galleries, SA, 1980". 
  47. ^ "See Box 137, Records of Holdsworth Galleries, National Library of Australia". 
  48. ^ "Holdsworth Gallery, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia". 
  49. ^ "Exhibition Poster, Greenhill Galleries, WA, 1987". 
  50. ^ "Greenhill Galleries, Claremont, Western Australia, Australia". 
  51. ^ "Photograph of the Artist, 1988, Messenger Press Collection, State Library, South Australia, B70869 945". 
  52. ^ "Photograph of the Artist, 1988, Messenger Press Collection, State Library, South Australia, B70869 944". 
  53. ^ "Exhibition Invitation Card, Greenhill Galleries, SA, 1988". 
  54. ^ "Art Exhibitions and Collections, Fringe Vault, 1988, Adelaide Fringe Inc". 
  55. ^ Ioannou, Noris (17 July 1993), "Searching the human state", The Advertiser, News Ltd, ISSN 1039-4192 
  56. ^ "Exhibition Invitation, Kensington Gallery, SA, 1993". 
  57. ^ "Exhibition Poster, Kensington Gallery, SA, 1993". 
  58. ^ "Exhibition Invitation Card, Greenhill Galleries, SA, 1985". 
  59. ^ "Art Exhibitions and Collections, Fringe Vault, 1976, Adelaide Fringe Inc". 
  60. ^ a b "Joyce Scott, Festival Craft Exhibition, Queen Victoria Museum & Art Gallery, Tasmania", Pottery in Australia, The Potters' Society of Australia, 21 (2): 56, November–December 1982, ISSN 0048-4954 
  61. ^ "Exhibition Invitation Card, Greenhill Galleries, SA, 1982". 
  62. ^ "Letter confirming participation in the Darling Downs National Ceramics Award, 1984". 
  63. ^ "Letter from Exhibition Patron, Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory". 
  64. ^ a b "South Australian Living Artists Festival". 
  65. ^ Salt of the Earth, 2015, Royal South Australian Society of Arts (RSASA) Members' Winter Exhibition held in conjunction with South Australian Living Artists Festival (SALA).
  66. ^ Point of View, 2015, Royal South Australian Society of Arts (RSASA) Fellows' Spring Exhibition, 25 Oct to 15 Nov.
  67. ^ Monochromatic, 2016, Royal South Australian Society of Arts (RSASA) Fellows' Summer Exhibition, 11 Dec to 10 Jan.
  68. ^ Out of the Box, 2016, Royal South Australian Society of Arts (RSASA) Members' Autumn Exhibition, 14 Feb to 13 Mar.
  69. ^ Rainy Days, 2016, Royal South Australian Society of Arts (RSASA) Members' Autumn Exhibition, 15 May to 5 June.
  70. ^ Captured Moments, 2016, Royal South Australian Society of Arts (RSASA) Members' Spring Exhibition held in conjunction with South Australian Living Artists Festival (SALA), 31 July to 28 August.
  71. ^ Caring For Our Planet, 7th Solar Art Prize, 2016, Royal South Australian Society of Arts (RSASA), 2 October to 23 October.
  72. ^ Proud To Be 160, Royal South Australian Society of Arts (RSASA) Anniversary Exhibition, Artworks by Significant Past Members, 2016, 28 October to 4 December.
  73. ^ Authentic Adelaide, 1 December 2016 to 15 January 2017; Presented by the Royal South Australian Society of Arts and supported by the Adelaide Town Hall; Celebrating the RSASA's 160th Anniversary and the Adelaide Town Hall's 150th Anniversary.
  74. ^ Imagine, 9 December 2016 to 15 January 2017; Presented by the Royal South Australian Society of Arts, RSA Gallery
  75. ^ Winds of Change, 19 February 2017 to 12 March 2017; Presented by the Royal South Australian Society of Arts, RSA Gallery
  76. ^ Wet, Wild & Woolly, 11 June 2017 to 2 July 2017; Presented by the Royal South Australian Society of Arts, RSA Gallery
  77. ^ New Life, 3 September 2017 to 24 September 2017; Presented by the Royal South Australian Society of Arts, RSA Gallery
  78. ^ 50cm urn inspired by the garden of Charles Windsor, Prince of Wales.
  79. ^ A Family Affair, 1 October 2017 to 22 October 2017; Presented by the Royal South Australian Society of Arts, RSA Gallery
  80. ^ "Parched Earth", The Masters of Modern Ceramics 1986, Faenza, Italy: Faenza Editrice S.p.A., 1986, ISSN 0392-8225 
  81. ^ "Parched Earth", La Ceramica Moderna, Faenza, Italy, 10: front page, December 1987, ISSN 0392-8225 
  82. ^ "Heat-Wave", ʼ88 International Pottery Exhibition, Tokyo, Japan: The Ceramics Arts Association of Japan: 28, June 1988 
  83. ^ "Joyce Scott", 2a Biennale Internazionale Di Ceramica Contemporanae, Grottaglie, Italy: dal Diagramma/Studioeffe di Grottaglie, September 1989 
  84. ^ "Craft Arts International, Issue 16 Contents (Under Scot, tJoyce)". 
  85. ^ "Whirl Wind", The 2nd International Ceramics Competition, Mino, Japan, Tajimi City Special Exhibition Hall, Mino, Japan: 119, October 1989 
  86. ^ "Craft Arts International, Issue 34 Contents". 
  87. ^ "Joyce Scott, Greenhill Galleries, SA", Pottery in Australia, The Potters' Society of Australia, 13 (1): 54, Autumn 1974, ISSN 0048-4954 
  88. ^ "Joyce Scott, 1976 Festival of Arts Exhibition, Adelaide", Pottery in Australia, The Potters' Society of Australia, 15 (1): 38, 69, Autumn 1976, ISSN 0048-4954 
  89. ^ "Joyce Scott, Night Eclipse", Pottery in Australia, The Potters' Society of Australia, 19 (1): 11, May–June 1980, ISSN 0048-4954 
  90. ^ "Joyce Scott, Daybreak", Pottery in Australia, The Potters' Society of Australia, 20 (2): 50, November–December 1981, ISSN 0048-4954 
  91. ^ "Joyce Scott, Bonython Exhibition, 1983", Pottery in Australia, The Potters' Society of Australia, 22 (2): inside cover, November–December 1983, ISSN 0048-4954 
  92. ^ "Joyce Scott, Olive Earth", Pottery in Australia, The Potters' Society of Australia, 26 (2): 12, May 1987, ISSN 0048-4954 
  93. ^ "Joyce Scott, Greenhill Galleries, Perth", Pottery in Australia, The Potters' Society of Australia, 26 (4): 63, December 1987, ISSN 0048-4954 
  94. ^ "Capturing the Wonder of Nature's Lifecycle", Pottery in Australia, The Potters' Society of Australia, 34 (1): 16–17, 74, Autumn 1995, ISSN 0048-4954 
  95. ^ Germaine, Max (1979), Artists and Galleries of Australia and New Zealand, Lansdowne Editions, p. 503, ISBN 0868320196 
  96. ^ Potters' Directory & Information Book, Potter's Society of Australia, 1981, p. 153, ISSN 0706-4209 
  97. ^ Anderson, Bruce; Hoare, John (1985), "Clay Statements", Australian Contemporary Ceramics, Darling Downs Institute Press: 84–85, ISBN 0949414042 
  98. ^ Lockwood, Ken (1984), Craft Australia: year book 1984, Crafts Council of Australia, ISSN 0311-046X 
  99. ^ Dr Ioannou, Noris (1986), Ceramics in South Australia 1836-1986 from Folk to Studio Pottery, Fine Art Publishing, p. 345, ISBN 0949268704 
  100. ^ "Adelaide Festival of Arts ʼ88", Art and Australia, The Fine Arts Press, 25 (2): 172, Summer 1987, ISSN 0004-301X 
  101. ^ "Joyce Scott, Olive Earth, Honourable mention for outstanding achievement in 1st International Mino Exhibition, Japan, 1986", Craft Australia, The Australian Craft Magazine, Crafts Council of Australia (2): 16, Winter 1987, ISSN 0311-046X 
  102. ^ South Australian Ceramic Inglewood Award 1988, Inglewood Brick Co Ltd, March 1988 
  103. ^ "Annual Buyers' Guide Supplement 1988-89", Craft Arts Maganize, Crafts Council of Australia (14): 100, 1988–1989, ISBN 0-9471-8658-1 
  104. ^ Lockwood, Ken (Summer 1992), Artfile, Artists and Designers, Makers of Australia, Craft Arts International, pp. 192–193, ISBN 0-9471-8658-1 
  105. ^ Kalori, Quadrennial Newsletter, Royal South Australian Society of Arts, May 2016, pp. 1, 4, 5 
  106. ^ "Kalori Archive, Royal South Australian Society of Arts". 
  107. ^ RSASA, Members Sketchbook II, Royal South Australian Society of Arts, 2016, pp. 53, 54 
  108. ^ Dutkiewicz, Adam (2016), A Visual History: The Royal South Australian Society of Arts, 1856-2016, Volume One, Royal South Australian Society of Arts Inc, p. 418, ISBN 9780994648006 
  109. ^ "A Visual History: The Royal South Australian Society of Arts, Volume One, 1856-2016, Trove Catalogue, National Library of Australia".