Jože Privšek

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Jože Privšek
Joze Privsek 1.jpg
Background information
Birth name Jože Privšek
Also known as Jeff Conway, Simon Gale
Born (1937-03-19)March 19, 1937
Ljubljana, Drava Banovina, Kingdom of Yugoslavia
Died June 11, 1998(1998-06-11) (aged 61)
Ljubljana, Slovenia
Genres classical music, pop music, jazz music, film music
Occupation(s) composer, conductor, arranger
Instruments piano, vibraphone

Jože Privšek (19 March 1937 – 11 June 1998), who also presented himself with the pseudonyms Jeff Conway and Simon Gale, was one of the most acclaimed Slovene jazz and pop musicians.[1] He was a pianist, a vibraphonist, a composer, and a conductor.[1]

Life[edit]

Privšek was born in Ljubljana. He studied music at the Ljubljana Intermediate Music School until 1955 and then for three years in the same city with the composer Lucijan Marija Škerjanc. He continued his studies at the Berklee College of Music in Boston in the United States with the professor Herb Pomeroy. He started his career as a pianist and a vibraphonist. In 1961, he took the post of the leader of the RTV Slovenia Big Band, which brought him the widest recognition, and retained it until 1995, and as the composer of numerous music works and arrangements of popular and jazz music. Privšek died in Ljubljana at the age of 61 years.[1]

Work[edit]

Some of Privšek's pop songs – among these are "Nad mestom se dani" (Dawn Above the City), "Vozi me vlak v daljave" (Train Drives Me Far Away), "Silvestrski poljub" (New Year's Eve Kiss), "Mati, bodiva prijatelja" (Mother, Let's Be Friends) – have become golden oldies in Slovenia. Among his best jazz works are "Porednež" (The Naughty Man), "Ognjemet" (Firework), "Zeleni pekel" (Green Hell), "Privid" (Mirage), "We Need Time", "Rožnik" (June), "That's for Ending", and others.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Sojar Voglar, Črt (2005). Jože Privšek (PDF) (in Slovene and English) (2nd ed.). Society of Slovene Composers. pp. 202–203. ISBN 961-91080-2-7.