Lawlessness

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Lawlessness is a lack of law, in any of the various senses of that word. Lawlessness may describe various conditions.

In society[edit]

Anomie is a breakdown of social bonds between an individual and their community, in which individuals do not feel bound by the moral strictures of society. The term was popularized by French sociologist Émile Durkheim in his influential 1897 book Suicide.[1]

Anarchy (meaning "without leadership"), is a condition in which a person or group of people reject societal hierarchies, laws, and other institutions. It often entails the dissolution of government.[2]

Anarchism is a political philosophy that advocates self-governed societies based on voluntary institutions.[3][4][5][6][7][8][9]

Civil disorder, or civil unrest, refers to public disturbances generally involving groups of people, and resulting in danger or damage to persons or property.[10] Civil disorder is a breakdown of civil society, and may be a form of protest. It may take various forms, such as illegal parades, sit-ins, riots, sabotage, and other forms of crime.

In nature[edit]

Randomness is the lack of pattern or predictability in events.[11]

In religion[edit]

Antinomianism, in Christianity, is a theological position which takes the principle of salvation by faith and divine grace to the point of asserting that the saved are not bound to follow the Law of Moses.[12]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mestrovic, Stjepan. Emile Durkheim and The Reformation of Sociology. 
  2. ^ "Decentralism: Where It Came From-Where Is It Going?". Amazon.com. Retrieved 2012-01-30. 
  3. ^ "ANARCHISM, a social philosophy that rejects authoritarian government and maintains that voluntary institutions are best suited to express man's natural social tendencies." George Woodcock. "Anarchism" at The Encyclopedia of Philosophy
  4. ^ "In a society developed on these lines, the voluntary associations which already now begin to cover all the fields of human activity would take a still greater extension so as to substitute themselves for the state in all its functions." Peter Kropotkin. "Anarchism" from the Encyclopædia Britannica
  5. ^ "Anarchism." The Shorter Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy. 2005. p. 14 "Anarchism is the view that a society without the state, or government, is both possible and desirable."
  6. ^ Sheehan, Sean. Anarchism, London: Reaktion Books Ltd., 2004. p. 85
  7. ^ "as many anarchists have stressed, it is not government as such that they find objectionable, but the hierarchical forms of government associated with the nation state." Judith Suissa. Anarchism and Education: a Philosophical Perspective. Routledge. New York. 2006. p. 7
  8. ^ "That is why Anarchy, when it works to destroy authority in all its aspects, when it demands the abrogation of laws and the abolition of the mechanism that serves to impose them, when it refuses all hierarchical organisation and preaches free agreement — at the same time strives to maintain and enlarge the precious kernel of social customs without which no human or animal society can exist." Peter Kropotkin. Anarchism: its philosophy and ideal
  9. ^ "anarchists are opposed to irrational (e.g., illegitimate) authority, in other words, hierarchy — hierarchy being the institutionalisation of authority within a society." "B.1 Why are anarchists against authority and hierarchy?" in An Anarchist FAQ
  10. ^ Schurink, W.J. (1990) Victimization: Nature and Trends. Human Sciences Research Council. ISBN 0796912580. p. 416.
  11. ^ The Oxford English Dictionary defines "random" as "Having no definite aim or purpose; not sent or guided in a particular direction; made, done, occurring, etc., without method or conscious choice; haphazard."
  12. ^ Encyclopædia Britannica: Antinomianism