Lindsey Doe

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Lindsey Doe
A candid grayscale portrait photo of a white woman; she is facing and smiling into the camera, and has a pair of spectacles resting on her short, dark hair.
Doe (taken June 27, 2014)
Born1981/1982 (age 39–40)
Education
Occupation
EmployerU. of Montana (2006–2014)

Lindsey Takara Doe (born 1981/1982) is a sexologist, sex educator, and host of Sexplanations on YouTube.

Personal life[edit]

Lindsey Takara Doe[1] was born in 1981 or 1982.[2] As of January 2017, she had three non-biological children: a five-year-old foster son and two teenaged daughters. Their lack of sex education drove Doe to create Sexplanations.[3] In 2015, when one of her daughters complained about a boy who wouldn't stop pestering her for a date, Doe took the opportunity and published a video addressing such harassment from boys; the video received international attention, spirited debate, and over 76,000 views in ten days.[4]

In 2010, Doe's photograph was featured alongside a personal statement as part of The Strong Women Project, exhibited at the Maureen and Mike Mansfield Library in Missoula, Montana. She was originally photographed "in a pressed collared shirt, slacks and matching jewelry", but felt she was misrepresenting herself; Doe returned to the shoot hours later, stripped to her underwear, and slathered herself in homemade mud to retake the photos.[5]

Education[edit]

For her Master of Science at the University of Montana (UM) in 2005, Doe's thesis was Phenomenological claim of first sexual intercourse among individuals of varied levels of sexual self-disclosure.[1] She received her Doctor of Philosophy in human sexuality from the then-accredited Institute for Advanced Study of Human Sexuality.[2]

Career[edit]

A self-described sexologist,[2] by February 2008, Doe had an office in Missoula—the city's first, helping clients with sexuality difficulties.[2] In 2015, her sexual health center was Birds and Bees LLC.[6]

She was also an adjunct professor at UM, teaching on human sexuality,[2] from 2006–2014. After her departure from the school due to budget cuts, enrollment numbers in the human-sexuality course dropped by half,[7] and by the 2017–2018 academic year, the course was gone altogether.[8] In autumn 2014, she was traveling across the United States and giving one-hour college lectures on sexual health.[7]

Sexplanations
In a sans-serif typeface, the logo says "Sexplanations with Dr. Doe" in red-and-black.
YouTube information
Channel
Years active2013–present
GenreHuman sexuality
Subscribers887K
Total views192,824,615
NetworkVlogbrothers
Catchphrase(s)Stay curious

Updated: December 15, 2020 (2020-12-15)

In April 2013, Doe partnered with Hank Green to found the YouTube channel Sexplanations, a series about human sexuality that began that July. By October 2013, the videos had already attracted controversy and attacks on its host; viewers have objected to Doe's use of the phrases "biosex male" and "biosex female" to refer to sex assignment, as well as her inclusion of "allies" in the initialism LGBTIQQAA2. The ratio of filmed content to the final videos is about 30:1, with Doe and her videographer agonizing over all the details. Guests on Sexplanations have included Eden Atwood and Hank Green.[9] The show's tagline is "stay curious".[8] In 2015, The Daily Dot raved about Sexplanations, calling it "not only an accomplishment in the world of sex education but the world of YouTube."[6] In June 2017, Doe expanded the Sexplanations brand to a similarly-themed podcast.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "'Phenomenological claim of first sexual intercourse among individuals o' by Lindsey Takara Doe". Department of Health and Human Performance. University of Montana. 2005. Archived from the original on September 24, 2020. Retrieved December 15, 2020.
  2. ^ a b c d e Duganz, Pat (February 7, 2008). "Still taboo". Missoula Independent. Archived from the original on March 5, 2016. Retrieved December 15, 2020. Missoula sexologist helps the hung up get off
  3. ^ Doe, Lindsey (January 12, 2017). 15 Mini Lessons in Sexuality (streaming video). Sexplanations. Retrieved December 15, 2010.
  4. ^ Wallwork, Ellen (November 3, 2015). "Mum's Important Message About Consent To Boy Who Likes Her Daughter: 'No Means No'". The Huffington Post. Archived from the original on July 31, 2016. Retrieved December 15, 2020.
  5. ^ Fredrickson, Erika (March 25, 2010). "Rosie the Riveter redux". Missoula Independent. Archived from the original on February 9, 2015. Retrieved December 15, 2020. The Strong Women Project goes beyond just a pretty face
  6. ^ a b Lanning, Carly (February 25, 2015). "Dr. Lindsey Doe is the sex-ed teacher you wish you had in high school". The Daily Dot. Archived from the original on April 4, 2017. Retrieved December 15, 2020. Her goal is simple: to eradicate shame and guilt associated with sex.
  7. ^ a b Loranger, Erin (November 13, 2014). "Fewer students enroll in Human Sexuality". Montana Kaimin. Archived from the original on October 28, 2017. Retrieved December 15, 2020.
  8. ^ a b c Nerbovig, Ashley (June 18, 2017). "Monday's Montanan: Sexologist Lindsey Doe wants Montana to stay curious". Missoulian. ISSN 0746-4495. OCLC 10049426. Archived from the original on December 15, 2020. Retrieved December 15, 2020.
  9. ^ Sakariassen, Alex (October 3, 2013). "House call". Missoula Independent. Archived from the original on September 10, 2015. Retrieved December 15, 2020. Sex, sci-fi and cisgender: Dr. Doe's new web series reaches the masses

External links[edit]