List of Jewish American cartoonists

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This is an alphabetized list of notable Jewish American cartoonists. Jewish Americans took the lead role in creating the comics industry.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Sangiacomo, Michael. "Jewish men took lead role in creating comics industry", The Plain Dealer. October 4, 2003. p. E6
  2. ^ Adams, Neal. Batman Illustrated by Neal Adams. Page 6. DC Comics, 2005.
  3. ^ Erens Patricia, Patricia Erens, The Jew in American Cinema 
  4. ^ Murray Polner (1982), American Jewish biographies 
  5. ^ "The Ultimate Spider-Decade: Part 2". Comic Book Resources. Retrieved November 30, 2010. 
  6. ^ From Krakow to Krypton: Jews and Comic Books https://books.google.com/books?isbn=0827610432 Arie Kaplan - 2010 - Art Broome. makes. a. clean. sweep. Julius“Julie”Julius“Julie”. Schwartz was, like Mort ... One of those clients was a Jewish short story writer named John Broome.
  7. ^ a b c d "Contemporary Scribes: Jewish American Cartoonists". Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies. Retrieved November 27, 2010. 
  8. ^ "The Escapist: Fantasy, Folklore, and the Pleasures of the Comic Book in Recent Jewish American Holocaust Fiction". Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies. Retrieved November 27, 2010. 
  9. ^ a b "That's funny? Jews in New Yorker cartoons". The Boston Globe. Archived from the original on January 10, 2010. Retrieved November 30, 2010. 
  10. ^ Comic Book Artist Collection. Retrieved November 30, 2010. 
  11. ^ "Celebrity Jews". Jweekly.com. August 2, 2007. Retrieved November 30, 2010. 
  12. ^ Secrets in the Shadows: The Art & Life of Gene Colan. Retrieved November 30, 2010. 
  13. ^ Webslinger: unauthorized essays on your friendly neighborhood Spider-man. Retrieved November 30, 2010. 
  14. ^ a b c d e f g Samantha Baskind, Ranen Omer-Sherman (2008). The Jewish graphic novel: critical approaches. Rutgers University Press. ISBN 0-8135-4367-3. Retrieved November 27, 2010. 
  15. ^ "Mightier than the Sword; Jewish cartoons and cartoonists in South Africa", Glenda Abramson, International Journal of Humor Research, Volume 4, Issue 2, Pages 149–64, ISSN 1613-3722, 1991
  16. ^ a b Stephen J. Whitfield (October 3, 2010). "The Distinctiveness of American Jewish Humor". Modern Judaism, Volume 6, Issue 3, pp. 245–60. Retrieved November 27, 2010. 
  17. ^ "Jordan B. Gorfinkel". Huffington Post. 
  18. ^ Heinberg[1] "Jewish authors who may be of interest... Allan Heinberg"
  19. ^ The Jews of Chicago: from shtetl to suburb. Retrieved November 30, 2010. 
  20. ^ "Jewish Cartoonists and the American Experience", A collaboration of the Ohio State University Melton Center for Jewish Studies and the Cartoon Research Library
  21. ^ Kilian, Michael (January 21, 2003). "Al Hirschfeld: 1903–2003; Caricaturist's style awed public, celebrities alike". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved November 30, 2010. 
  22. ^ The Jewish graphic novel: critical approaches. Retrieved December 4, 2010. 
  23. ^ Up, up, and oy vey!: how Jewish history, culture, and values shaped the comic book superhero. June 27, 2006. Retrieved December 4, 2010. 
  24. ^ a b "X-Men as J Men: The Jewish Subtext of a Comic Book Movie". Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies. Retrieved November 27, 2010. 
  25. ^ You should see yourself: Jewish identity in postmodern American culture. Retrieved December 4, 2010. 
  26. ^ a b Arie Kaplan (2008). From Krakow to Krypton: Jews and comic books. Jewish Publication Society. ISBN 0-8276-0843-8. Retrieved November 27, 2010. 
  27. ^ "Jewish Cartoonists and the American Experience". The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum. Retrieved December 4, 2010. 
  28. ^ . (May 7, 2004). "Comics: Momma". The Washington Post. Retrieved December 4, 2010. 
  29. ^ Jewish humor: what the best Jewish jokes say about the Jews. Retrieved December 4, 2010. 
  30. ^ Dubner, Stephen J. (December 13, 2006). "The Death of a Jewish Superhero Creator". The New York Times. Retrieved December 4, 2010. 
  31. ^ "Of Mice And Menschen: Jewish Comics Come of Age", Авторы P. Buhle, Журнал Tikkun, Издательство, Institute for Labor & Mental Health
  32. ^ a b Shelley M. Buxbaum, Sara E. Karesh (2003), "Important people in American Jewish history", Jewish faith in America, ISBN 978-0-8160-4986-8 
  33. ^ "We Were Talking Jewish; Art Spiegelmans's Maus as Holocaust Production, Contemporary Literature, Michael Rothberg, 1994

External links[edit]