List of boogie woogie musicians

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Among the many boogie-woogie musicians are not only blues players,[citation needed] but rock and roll, and country musicians as well, and at least one classical musician.

Musicians noted for playing boogie-woogie (many of whom also perform in other styles):

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  • Willie Hall, known as Drive'em Down, model and mentor to many New Orleans players
  • Jools Holland, (born 1958) British musician and television presenter
  • Camille Howard (1914–1993), American pianist and singer
  • Bob Hall (born 1942), English pianist
  • Henri Herbert, English pianist, member of The Jim Jones Revue
  • John Lee Hooker (1912–2001), American boogie & blues singer and guitarist, born in Mississippi
  • Nicky Hopkins (1944-1994) English pianist and organist performed on British and American pop and rock music

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  • Elton John, (1947) English singer, pianist, and composer
  • Pete Johnson, (1904–1967) Big Joe Turner's piano partner; "Roll 'Em Pete" was named for him
  • Louis Jordan, (1908–1975) American boogie and jump blues musician, songwriter and bandleader

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  • Michael Kaeshammer, (born 1977), a Canadian pianist, vocalist, and arranger
  • Shizuko Kasagi (1914–1985), Japanese singer known in Japan as the "Queen of the Boogie-Woogie" (ブギの女王, Bugi no ojō).
  • Joe Krown, blues/R&B pianist/organist based in New Orleans

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  • Memphis Slim (1915–1988)
  • Big Maceo Merriweather (1905–1953), composer of "Chicago Breakdown"
  • Moon Mullican (1909–1967), known as the "King of the Hillbilly Piano Players" during a recording career that stretched from the 1930s through the 1960s, including hits such as Seven Nights to Rock; considered a major influence on Jerry Lee Lewis.

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  • Jimmy Yancey (1898–1951), American pianist, composer, and lyricist

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Additional note[edit]

Meade Lux Lewis, Albert Ammons, and Pete Johnson sometimes played together by twos or threes, an unusual practice. See Boogie-woogie for more information.

References[edit]