Marie A. Vitulli

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Marie Vitulli
Marie A. Vitulli.jpg
Born (1949-11-19) November 19, 1949 (age 68)
Nationality American
Alma mater

B.A., University of Rochester, 1971

Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1976
Known for Seminormal rings, valuations on commutative rings
Awards AWM/MAA Falconer Lecturer
2017 AWM Service Award
Scientific career
Fields Mathematics
Institutions University of Oregon
Thesis Weierstrass Points and Monomial Curves (1976)
Doctoral advisor Dock Sang Rim
Website pages.uoregon.edu/vitulli/

Marie A. Vitulli is an American mathematician and professor emerita at the University of Oregon.

Mathematics[edit]

Vitulli's research is in commutative algebra and applications to algebraic geometry. More specific topics in her research include deformations of monomial curves, seminormal rings, the weak normality of commutative rings and algebraic varieties, weak subintegrality, and the theory of valuations for commutative rings.[1] Along with her colleague David K. Harrison, she developed a unified valuation theory for rings with zero divisors that generalized both Krull and Archimedean valuations.[2]

She was an undergraduate at the University of Rochester[1] and obtained her Ph.D. in 1976 at the University of Pennsylvania under the supervision of Dock-Sang Rim. Her dissertation was Weierstrass Points and Monomial Curves.[3] The title of her 2014 Falconer lecture was "From Algebraic to Weak Subintegral Extensions in Algebra and Geometry."[4]

Activism[edit]

Marie Vitulli and political scientist Gordon Lafer led an effort to unionize faculty at the University of Oregon beginning in the spring of 2007.[5] This effort eventually led to the formation of the United Academics at the University of Oregon.[6]

Vitulli heads the Women in Math Project at the University of Oregon.[1][7] With Mary Flahive, Vitulli has also studied patterns in hiring among women mathematicians.[8] Vitulli has also written about the difficulties involved with documenting the lives of female mathematicians on Wikipedia.[9]

Recognition[edit]

Vitulli was recognized as an AWM/MAA Falconer Lecturer in 2014.[1] Vitulli received a Service Award from the Association for Women in Mathematics in 2017.[10]

She is part of the 2019 class of fellows of the Association for Women in Mathematics.[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Marie A. Vitulli". Past Falconer Lecturers. Association for Women in Mathematics. Retrieved 7 March 2018.
  2. ^ Harrison, D. K.; Vitulli, M. A. (1989). "V-Valuations of a Commutative Ring I". J. Algebra. 65 (3): 264–292. doi:10.1016/0021-8693(89)90305-0. MR 1024992. Retrieved 24 April 2018.Free to read
  3. ^ Marie A. Vitulli at the Mathematics Genealogy Project
  4. ^ "Marie A. Vitulli named 2014 AWM-MAA Falconer Lecturer". Center for the Study of Women in Society. University of Oregon. Retrieved 7 March 2017.
  5. ^ Baez, David. "Labor Pains". Eugene Weekly. Retrieved 7 March 2018.
  6. ^ "Our History". United Academics of the University of Oregon.
  7. ^ The Women in Math Project, University of Oregon, retrieved 2018-03-09
  8. ^ Case, Bettye Anne; Leggett, Anne M. (2016), Complexities: Women in Mathematics, Princeton University Press, p. 107, ISBN 9781400880164
  9. ^ Vitulli, Marie A. (2017). "Writing Women in Mathematics into Wikipedia". arXiv:1710.11103 [math.HO].
  10. ^ "Katie Kavanagh, Michelle Manes, Maura Mast and Marie Vitulli Receive the Association for Women in Mathematics Service Award". Association for Women in Mathematics. Retrieved 7 March 2018.
  11. ^ 2019 Class of AWM Fellows, Association for Women in Mathematics, retrieved 2018-10-07

External links[edit]