Matsudaira Tadamasa

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Matsudaira Tadamasa
Matsudaira Tadamasa.png
Native name
松平 忠昌
Born(1598-01-21)January 21, 1598
DiedSeptember 20, 1645(1645-09-20) (aged 47)
Edo, Japan
Burial placeEiheiji, Fukui, Japan
NationalityJapanese
Spouse(s)Hanahime, daughter of Asano Yoshinaga
Ichihime, daughter of kuge Hirohashi Kuroishi
Parent(s)
1st Daimyō of Anegasaki Domain
In office
1607–1615
Succeeded byMatsudaira Naomasa
7th Daimyō of Shimotsuma Domain
In office
1615–1616
Preceded byTokugawa Yorifusa
Succeeded byMatsudaira Sadatsuna
Daimyō of Matsushiro Domain
In office
1616–1618
Preceded byMatsudaira Tadateru
Succeeded bySakai Tadakatsu
Daimyō of Takada Domain
In office
1618–1623
Preceded bySakai Tadakatsu
Succeeded byMatsudaira Mitsunaga
Daimyō of Fukui Domain
In office
1623–1645
Preceded byMatsudaira Tadanao
Succeeded byMatsudaira Mitsumichi

Matsudaira Tadamasa (松平 忠昌, 21 January 1598 – 20 September 1645) was an early to mid-Edo period Japanese samurai, and daimyō.[1]

Biography[edit]

Tadamasa was born in Osaka as the second son of Yūki Hideyasu.[1] His childhood name was Toramatsu (虎松) later become Toranosuke (虎之助). In 1607, he was received in audience by his grandfather, Tokugawa Ieyasu and uncle Tokugawa Hidetada. Hidetada took a liking to the boy, and ordered that he be raised in the Tokugawa household by Eishō-in together with Tokugawa Yorinobu. In the same year, he was assigned a fief of 10,000 koku, and became daimyō of Kazusa-Anegasaki Domain.

He was noted for his skill in the martial arts, and accompanied Hidetada during the Siege of Osaka, where he was frustrated that he would not be allowed to participate in the battle due to his youth. He strongly petitioned Hidetada to perform his genpuku ceremony before the start of the Osaka summer campaign, and Hidetada agreed, granting him a kanji from his name and Court rank of Senior Fifth Rank, Lower Grade and the courtesy title was Iyo-no-kami. He subsequently distinguished himself in combat with his prowess with the spear, which later became an heirloom of the Echizen-Matsudaira clan.

As a reward for his actions in battle, he was transferred to Shimotsuma Domain in Hitachi Province (30,000 koku) in 1615, but the following year he replaced the disgraced Matsudaira Tadateru at Matsushiro Domain in Shinano Province (120,000 koku). In 1619 he was transferred again, this time to Takada Domain in Echigo Province (250,000 koku). In 1623, he replaced his elder brother Matsudaira Tadanao as daimyō of Fukui Domain (500,000 koku)[1] In 1626 his court rank was raised to Senior Fourth Rank, Lower Grade. In 1634, he accompanied Shōgun Tokugawa Iemitsu to Kyoto, and Fukui Domain reached its peak kokudaka of 505,600 koku.

In 1637, he was disappointed that no order came to lead his troops during the Shimabara Rebellion, so he visited the battle in a private capacity with only twelve retainers. In 1643, he ordered the rebuilding of Mikuni Harbor as the main port of Fukui Domain. He died in 1648 at the domain's residence in Edo. On his death, seven of his senior retainers also committed junshi. His grave is at the temple of Eihei-ji in Fukui.

He had a magnificent upper residence (kamiyashiki) constructed outside Edo Castle.

Family[edit]

References[edit]

  • Papinot, Edmond. (1948). Historical and Geographical Dictionary of Japan. New York: Overbeck Co.

External links[edit]

Fukui Domain on "Edo 300 HTML" (3 November 2007) (in Japanese)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Papinot, Jacques Edmond Joseph. (1906). Dictionnaire d’histoire et de géographie du Japon; Papinot, (2003). "Matsudaira" at Nobiliare du Japon, p. 30; retrieved 2013-4-9.
Preceded by
______
Mitsubaaoi.jpgDaimyō of Anegasaki
1607–1615
Succeeded by
Matsudaira Naomasa
Preceded by
Tokugawa Yorifusa
Mitsubaaoi.jpgDaimyō of Shimotsuma
1615–1616
Succeeded by
Matsudaira Sadatsuna
Preceded by
Matsudaira Tadateru
Mitsubaaoi.jpgDaimyō of Matsushiro
1616–1618
Succeeded by
Sakai Tadakatsu
Preceded by
Sakai Tadakatsu
Mitsubaaoi.jpgDaimyō of Takada
1618–1623
Succeeded by
Matsudaira Mitsunaga
Preceded by
Matsudaira Tadanao
Mitsubaaoi.jpg 3rd Daimyō of Fukui
1623–1645
Succeeded by
Matsudaira Mitsumichi