Mindanao treeshrew

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Mindanao treeshrew[1]
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Scandentia
Family: Tupaiidae
Genus: Urogale
Mearns, 1905
Species: U. everetti
Binomial name
Urogale everetti
(Thomas, 1892)
Mindanao Treeshrew area.png
Mindanao treeshrew range

The Mindanao treeshrew (Urogale everetti), also called the Philippine tree shrew, is a species of treeshrew endemic to the Mindanao region in the Philippines.[2] It is the only member of the genus Urogale. The scientific name commemorates British colonial administrator and zoological collector Alfred Hart Everett.

Range and habitat[edit]

It is found, as its name suggests, in Mindanao, in the Philippines. It lives in rain forests and montane forests.

Description[edit]

It is the heaviest treeshrew, weighing about 355 g, and is terrestrial.[3] The body is 17–20 cm, and the tail is 11–17 cm. It has a particularly elongated snout and a rounded, even-haired tail. The fur is brownish, but with orange or yellow underparts.

It is diurnal in its habits, and it climbs well and runs fast on the ground.

Diet[edit]

Its diet is varied. It includes insects, lizards, young birds, bird's eggs, and fruit.

Reproduction[edit]

In the wild, it is thought to nest on the ground or on cliffs. Their breeding habits have been observed in captivity, where females have produced one or two young after a gestation period of 54–56 days.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Helgen, K.M. (2005). Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M., eds. Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 108–109. ISBN 978-0-8018-8221-0. OCLC 62265494. 
  2. ^ a b Tabaranza, B.; Gonzalez, J. C.; Ambal, G. & Heaney, L. (2008). "Urogale everetti". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2008. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 30 December 2008. 
  3. ^ Napier JR, Napier PH. (1968) A handbook of living primates. Morphology, ecology and behaviour of nonhuman primates. Academic, London
  • Macmillan Illustrated Animal Encyclopedia