Moses Goldsmith Building

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Moses Goldsmith Building
MosesGoldsmithBuilding.jpg
Front of the Goldsmith Building
Moses Goldsmith Building is located in Ohio
Moses Goldsmith Building
Moses Goldsmith Building is located in the US
Moses Goldsmith Building
Location 356 Bryant, Cincinnati, Ohio
Coordinates 39°8′44″N 84°31′17″W / 39.14556°N 84.52139°W / 39.14556; -84.52139Coordinates: 39°8′44″N 84°31′17″W / 39.14556°N 84.52139°W / 39.14556; -84.52139
Area less than one acre
Built 1900
Architectural style Second Renaissance Revival
NRHP Reference # 82003580[1]
Added to NRHP June 10, 1982

The Moses Goldsmith Building is a historic residence in Cincinnati, Ohio, United States. Built in 1900,[1] it was originally owned by Moses Goldsmith, the president of a firm that sold notions; rather than living in the house, Goldsmith built it for investment purposes, renting it to others.[2]

A brick house with elements of sandstone and limestone,[3] the Goldsmith Building has been ranked as a fine example of Renaissance Revival architecture. Distinctive elements of its design include prominent string courses and molding courses, plus a large loggia.[2]

The Goldsmith Building was erected in the Clifton neighborhood at a time when that neighborhood was expanding greatly. Large numbers of prosperous members of Cincinnati society built grand homes in the neighborhood, making it a highly distinctive portion of the city. The house did not long stay in the Goldsmith family; Moses died within a few years of its construction, and his heirs sold the property in 1912.[2] After Goldsmith's time, it was converted from a single-family residence to a multi-family residence. In 1982, the Goldsmith Building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places, due to its historically significant architecture;[1] key to this designation was its loggia, which is almost unknown in Cincinnati.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c National Park Service (2009-03-13). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  2. ^ a b c d Owen, Lorrie K., ed. Dictionary of Ohio Historic Places. Vol. 1. St. Clair Shores: Somerset, 1999, 605.
  3. ^ Goldsmith, Moses, Building, Ohio Historical Society, 2007. Accessed 2010-11-04.