NGC 2770

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
NGC 2770
NGC 2770 Gemini.jpg
NGC 2770 and companion galaxy
Credit: Gemini Observatory/AURA.
Observation data (J2000 epoch)
Constellation Lynx
Right ascension 09h 09m 33.7s[1]
Declination +33° 05′ 05″
Redshift 1941 ± 7 km / second
Distance 88 Mly (27 Mpc)[2]
Apparent magnitude (V) 12.0[1]
Characteristics
Type SAC(s)c[1]
See also: Galaxy, List of galaxies

NGC 2770 is a type SASc spiral galaxy located about 88 million light years away, in the constellation Lynx.[1] Three Type Ib supernovae have occurred there recently: SN 1999eh, SN 2007uy, and SN 2008D.[3] The last of these is famous for being the first supernova detected by the X-rays released very early on in its formation, rather than by the optical light emitted during the later stages, which allowed the first moments of the outburst to be observed. It is possible that NGC 2770's interactions with a suspected companion galaxy may have created the massive stars causing this activity.[4]

SN 2015bh, a Type II supernova, was discovered in NGC 2770 in February 2015.[5]

NGC 2770 was also the target for the first binocular image produced by the Large Binocular Telescope.[6]

The Type Ib supernova Supernova 2008D in galaxy NGC 2770, shown in X-ray (left) and visible light (right). NASA image

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database". Results for NGC 2770. Retrieved 2008-05-26. 
  2. ^ Soderberg, Alicia; et al. (May 22, 2008). "An extremely luminous X-ray outburst at the birth of a supernova". Nature. 453 (7194): 469–474. arXiv:0802.1712Freely accessible. Bibcode:2008Natur.453..469S. doi:10.1038/nature06997. PMID 18497815. 
  3. ^ Thoene, Christina C.; et al. "NGC 2770 - a supernova Ib factory?". arXiv:0807.0473Freely accessible. 
  4. ^ "Catching the Light of a Baby Supernova". Gemini Observatory. Archived from the original on 7 July 2015. Retrieved 7 July 2015. 
  5. ^ "List of Supernovae". IAU Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams. IAU. Retrieved 19 February 2017. 
  6. ^ LBT Press Release - First Binocular Light

External links[edit]

Coordinates: Sky map 09h 09m 33.7s, +33° 05′ 05″