Nagar Brahmins

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This article is about the social caste. For the moth family, see Brahmaeidae. For similarly spelled words, see Nagar (disambiguation).
Nagar Brahmin
Jai Hatkesh logo.jpg
Varna Brahmin
Gotra See list below
Veda Based on the Surname
Kuladevta (male) Hatkeshwar
Kuladevi (female) Based on the Surname
Guru Thakurji
Nishan Kalam, Kadchhi, Barchhi
Religions AUM symbol, the primary (highest) name of the God as per the Vedas.svg Hinduism
Languages Gujarati, Malvi, Hindi, English
Country India, USA, Canada
Populated States Gujarat, Rajasthan, New Jersey, Illinois, Ontario
Region Malwa, Mumbai, Kolkata
Ethnicity Indian
Migration to India Ancient Greece-Hindu Kush
Notable members Narsinh Mehta, see list below
Subdivisions Vadnagara, Visnagara, Prashnora, Sathodra, Chitroda, Krashnora
Nagar Brahmins in western India (c. 1855-1862).

Nagars are a Brahmin group found primarily in Gujarat, and also in Malwa and in the states of Maharashtra, Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan, Uttar Pradesh, Bihar even as far as Punjab, Haryana, Himachal Pradesh in the north, West Bengal in the east and Karnataka in the south. In North India, they form a sub-group of Vyas Brahmins.

"Hatkeshwar Mahadev Temple Vadnagar"

Origin[edit]

The oldest account of the Nagars is given in the Nagar Khand, a part of the Skanda Purana.[1]

The eminent historian D. R. Bhandarkar was the first to point out that the surnames used by the Nagar Brahmins in the recent past are amongst the surnames of Brahmins in whose favour the Kings made grants, as found in early inscriptions between the 6th and 8th centuries AD.[2] Dr. Bhandarkar has shown that the Sapadalaksha Brahmins were the same as the Nagar Brahmins, who were undoubtedly of Alpine origin. Alpine Aryans are believed to have entered India as part of Aryan immigration during the third millennium BC. It has been suggested that the Nagar Brahmins along with the present-day Bengali Kayasthas are amongst the purest forms of this type; they were originally the Brahmin priests of the Alpines, as evident from several early inscriptions, and that probably explains their comparative pure state till now.[3]

Notable people[edit]

See also[edit]

Nagar Muslims

References[edit]

  1. ^ Research in Sociology: Abstracts of M.A. and Ph. D. Dissertations Completed in the Department of Sociology, University of Bombay, Concept Publishing Company, 1989, p. 100
  2. ^ S. K. Sharma, U. Sharma (2005). Discovery of North-East India: Geography, History, Culture, Religion, Politics, Sociology, Science, Education and Economy. North-East India. Volume 1. Mittal Publications. p. 182. ISBN 978-81-83-24035-2. 
  3. ^ S. K. Sharma, U. Sharma (2005). Discovery of North-East India: Geography, History, Culture, Religion, Politics, Sociology, Science, Education and Economy. North-East India. Volume 1. Mittal Publications. pp. 48,176. ISBN 978-81-83-24035-2. 
  4. ^ Edwardes, S. M. Memoir of Rao Bahadur Ranchhodlal Chhotalal, C.I.E. 

External links[edit]