Nihad Awad

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Nihad Awad
Nihad Awad.jpg
Born Amman New Camp, Amman, Jordan
Residence United States of America
Nationality Palestinian - American
Education University of Minnesota
Occupation Executive Director
Employer Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR)
Website http://nihadawad.blogspot.com/

Nihad Awad (Arabic: نهاد عوض) is the Executive Director and Founder of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR).

Early life[edit]

Nihad Awad was born in Amman New Camp, a Palestinian refugee camp in Amman, Jordan. He studied at Second Amman Preparatory School for Boys, located at the camp and belongs to UNRWA, and at Salaheddine High School in Achrafieh in Jordan. He moved to Italy and later to the United States to pursue his university studies.[citation needed]

Career[edit]

After studying civil engineering at the University of Minnesota in the 1990s,[1][2] he worked at the University of Minnesota Medical Center. After the Gulf War, he was Public Relations Director for the Islamic Association for Palestine (IAP).

In June 1994, IAP President Omar Ahmad and others founded the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR), and Awad was hired as the Executive Director. In a March 1994 speech at Barry University, future CAIR Executive Director Awad said in response to an audience question about the various humanitarian efforts in the Palestinian Occupied Territories, "I am in support of the Hamas movement more than the PLO... there are some [Hamas] radicals, we are not interested in those people.”[3][4]

A few days after the September 11 attacks in 2001, Awad was one of a select group American Muslim leaders invited by the White House to join President Bush in a press conference condemning the attacks and acts of anti-Muslim intolerance that followed.[5]

Awards & honors[edit]

Nihad Awad (second from right) stands to President Bush's left, when Bush said "Like the good folks standing with me, the American people were appalled and outraged at last Tuesday's attacks [on Sept. 11, 2001]."[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1] Archived March 11, 2007, at the Wayback Machine.
  2. ^ [2] Archived February 21, 2006, at the Wayback Machine.
  3. ^ Statement by Nihad Awad at a panel discussion, “The Road to Peace: the Challenge of the Middle East,” Barry University, March 22, 1994."Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2012-05-03. Retrieved 2007-03-02. 
  4. ^ Kushner, Harvey W. (1998). "The future of terrorism: violence in the new millennium". Retrieved November 27, 2009. 
  5. ^ ""Islam is Peace" Says President". Georgewbush-whitehouse.archives.gov. Retrieved 2010-04-18. 
  6. ^ ""Islam is Peace" Says President". Office of the Press Secretary. September 17, 2001.  Retrieved on Jan. 27, 2007
  7. ^ http://www.blogger.com/profile/16025605882787185339
  8. ^ http://www.arabianbusiness.com/power100-2010/list?view=profile&itemid=150752

External links[edit]