Proportion (architecture)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Proportion is a central principle of architectural theory. It is the visual effect of the relationships of the various objects and spaces that make up a structure to one another and to the whole. These relationships are often governed by multiples of a standard unit of length known as a "module".[1]

Proportion in architecture was discussed by Vitruvius, Alberti, Andrea Palladio and Le Corbusier among others.

Classical architecture[edit]

Orders of Architecture, with modules of the elements of the capital

In classical architecture, the module was established as the radius of the lower shaft of a classical column, with proportions expressed as a fraction or multiple of that module.[2]

Le Corbusier[edit]

In his Le Modulor (1948), Le Corbusier presented a system of proportion which took the golden section and a man with a raised arm as the scalable modules of proportion.

Commemorative coin illustrating Le Corbusier's Modulor

References[edit]

  1. ^ James Stevens Curl (ed.), Oxford Dictionary of Architecture, 2nd ed. (Oxford, 2006), 606-607.
  2. ^ James Stevens Curl (ed.), Oxford Dictionary of Architecture, 2nd ed. (Oxford, 2006), 496.

Further reading[edit]