Ptichka (Buran-class spacecraft)

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"Ptichka"
Russian: Птичка
Country  Soviet Union Kazakhstan Russia
Named after "little bird" (informal nickname only)
Status 95-97% complete, property of Kazakhstan-Russia Joint Venture Company Aelita, at the Baikonur Cosmodrome, in the MZK Building.[1]
Time spent in space Never flew in space

Ptichka (Russian: Пти́чка, IPA: [ˈptʲitɕkə], Little Bird) is an informal nickname for the second space shuttle orbiter to be produced as part of the Soviet/Russian Buran program. It carried the GRAU index serial number 11F35 K2 and is - depending on the source - also known as "OK-1K2", "Orbiter K2", "OK 1.02" or "Shuttle 1.02". This Buran-class shuttle orbiter was never officially named. Ptichka was an informal nickname for all of the Buran-class orbiters. Burya (Russian: Буря, tempest) has been mentioned as a likely official name for the OK-1K2 orbiter[citation needed] after its completion.

OK-1K2 is distinguishable from the other Buran-class orbiters by a red framework attached to the top of its cargo bay doors.

Construction[edit]

Main article: Buran program

Construction of the second orbiter started in 1988, and although OK-1K2 was closest to being completed of any of the Buran-class orbiters (after the OK-1K1 orbiter), it was never finished. The program was officially canceled in 1993, at which point the shuttle was 95-97% complete.

Projected flights[edit]

Projected flights[2] as of 1989:

  • 1991 — unmanned first flight, with a duration of 1–2 days.
  • 1992 — unmanned second flight, with a duration of 7–8 days. Orbital maneuvers and space station approach test.

Changed in 1991:

  • December 1991 — unmanned second flight, with a duration of 7–8 days. Orbital maneuvers and space station approach test:
    • automatic docking with Mir's Kristall module.
    • crew transfer from Mir to the shuttle, with testing of some of its systems in the course of twenty-four hours, including the remote manipulator
    • undocking and autonomous flight in orbit
    • docking of the manned Soyuz-TM 101 with the shuttle
    • crew transfer from the Soyuz to the shuttle and on board work in the course of twenty-four hours
    • automatic undocking and landing

Status[edit]

OK-1K2 is currently the property of Kazakhstan-Russia Joint Venture Company Aelita, a subsidiary of RKK Energia, and is stored in the MZK building at Baikonur Cosmodrome.[1] Location: 45°56′25.6″N 63°19′6.3″E / 45.940444°N 63.318417°E / 45.940444; 63.318417.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]