Road Wild

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Road Wild
Created by Eric Bischoff
Promotion(s) World Championship Wrestling
First event Hog Wild
Last event Road Wild (1999)

Road Wild (originally known as Hog Wild) was a professional wrestling pay-per-view (PPV) event produced by World Championship Wrestling (WCW) that was held in the month of August from 1996 to 1999. It was a free event held in Sturgis, South Dakota during the annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally.[1] After the first event, WCW changed the name to Road Wild because of a potential trademark issue with the Harley-Davidson club Harley Owners Group (HOG). In 2000, it was replaced by New Blood Rising. Hulk Hogan appeared in the main event of all four editions of the event.

WrestleCrap writer Art O'Donnell criticised the event as a "financial blunder" and said that WCW held "a yearly pay-per-view at a biker rally with zero live gate just because Eric Bischoff loves motorcycles".[2]

Since 2001, WWE (through its subsidiary WCW, Inc.) owns the rights to the event. In 2015, all WCW pay-per-views were made available on the WWE Network.

Road Wild dates and venues[edit]

Event Date City Venue Main Event
Hog Wild August 10, 1996 Sturgis, South Dakota Sturgis Motorcycle Rally The Giant (c) vs. Hollywood Hogan for the WCW World Heavyweight Championship
Road Wild (1997) August 9, 1997 Sturgis, South Dakota Sturgis Motorcycle Rally Lex Luger (c) vs. Hollywood Hogan for the WCW World Heavyweight Championship
Road Wild (1998) August 8, 1998 Sturgis, South Dakota Sturgis Motorcycle Rally Diamond Dallas Page and Jay Leno vs. Hollywood Hogan and Eric Bischoff
Road Wild (1999) August 14, 1999 Sturgis, South Dakota Sturgis Motorcycle Rally Hulk Hogan (c) vs. Kevin Nash in a retirement match for the WCW World Heavyweight Championship
(c) – refers to the champion(s) heading into the match

References[edit]

  1. ^ Guerrero, Eddie (2005). Cheating Death, Stealing Life: The Eddie Guerrero Story. Simon and Schuster. p. 137. ISBN 0-7434-9353-2. 
  2. ^ O'Donnell, Art (July 25, 2013). "Induction: The Self-Destruction of the Ultimate Warrior: A Lesson in Professionalism from WWE's Spiteful Owner". WrestleCrap. Retrieved November 30, 2014.