Roman Genn

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Roman Genn (born May 17, 1972, Moscow) is an American artist. He is most well known for his illustrations for the conservative magazine National Review, of which he is a contributing editor.[1] Genn grew up in Moscow and moved to the United States in 1991. While living in the USSR he was repeatedly arrested for publicly exhibiting anti-government caricatures.[2][3]

Besides National Review, Genn's work has appeared in the Los Angeles Times, the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, Chicago Tribune, Baltimore Sun, New York Daily News, International Herald Tribune, Newsday, Newsweek, Harper/Collins, Penguin Group (USA), Saatchi & Saatchi, TV Guide, Barron's, and The American Lawyer, among others.[4]

There was an uproar during the Clinton years when Genn depicted Bill Clinton, Hillary Clinton and Al Gore on a National Review cover titled "The Manchurian Candidates."[5] Genn's covers depicting Sonia Sotomayor as a Buddha and President Barack Obama as a proctologist produced similar responses.[6]

In 2009, Genn embedded himself with the 3rd Battalion 8th Marines at Forward Operating Base Gulistan in Farah Province, central Afghanistan, where he drew sketches of that unit's actions in the Global War on Terror.[7][8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bernard Chapin (July 2, 2007). "Art, booze, and women: An interview with Roman Genn". Enter Stage Right. 
  2. ^ Francis X. Clines (March 30, 1997). "Caricature in the Age of Political Correctness". The New York Times. 
  3. ^ James Panero (July 17, 2007). "Roman Genn and "Upset Proletarian Sensibilities"". The New Criterion. 
  4. ^ Bernard Chapin (August 16, 2004). "Art as a sword: An interview with Roman Genn". Enter Stage Right. 
  5. ^ Francis X. Clines (March 30, 1997). "Caricature in the Age of Political Correctness". The New York Times. 
  6. ^ Jason Linkins (July 5, 2009). "National Review Perplexing Depicts Sotyomayor as Asian". The Huffington Post. 
  7. ^ Roman Genn (August 24, 2009). "Afghan postcards". National Review. 
  8. ^ Roman Genn (August 26, 2009). "Portrait of the Artist in Afghanistan". National Review Online. 

External links[edit]