Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature

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Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature
Sami Rohr Prize Logo.jpg
Awarded forrecognising the unique role of contemporary writers in the transmission and examination of the Jewish experience, and to encourage and promote outstanding writing of Jewish interest.
CountryUnited States
Presented byJewish Book Council
First awarded2006
Websitewww.jewishbookcouncil.org

The Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature is an annual prize awarded to an outstanding literary work of Jewish interest.

History[edit]

In 2006, the Jewish philanthropist Sami Rohr's descendants honoured his love of Jewish literature by inaugurating the Sami Rohr Prize on his 80th birthday.[1]

The annual award, alternating between fiction and non-fiction, seeks to promote writings of Jewish interest, and to encourage the examination of Jewish values among "emerging" writers.[2]

The $100,000 prize is among the richest literary prizes in the world. The runner-up award is called the Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature Choice Award, and is worth $25,000.

Eligibility and selection[edit]

The Prize is coordinated and administered by the Jewish Book Council. Works are sought and nominated by an advisory panel, and the finalists, runner-up and winner are selected by an independent panel of judges.

Translated works are eligible. Eligible non-fiction works are restricted to the domains of biography, history, Jewish current affairs, Jewish scholarship, or contemporary Jewish life.

Finalists and winners[edit]

The gold medal (Gold) marks the winner, while the silver medal (Silver) marks the runner-up.


2017[edit]

The finalists were announced April 3, 2017.[3] The awardees were announced May 3, 2017.[4]

2016[edit]

2015[edit]

The finalists were announced in January 2015.[5] The awardees were announced in February 2015.[6]

2014[edit]

The finalists were announced on November 7, 2013.[7] The winners were declared in January 2014.[8]

  • Gold The Aleppo Codex: A True Story of Obsession, Faith, and the Pursuit of an Ancient Bible, by Matti Friedman
  • Silver Becoming Frum: How Newcomers Learn the Language and Culture of Orthodox Judaism, by Sarah Bunin Benor
  • Jews and Booze: Becoming American in the Age of Prohibition, by Marni Davis
  • Embodying Hebrew Culture: Aesthetics, Athletics, and Dance in the Jewish Community of Mandate Palestine, by Nina S. Spiegel
  • The Genius: Elijah of Vilna and the Making of Modern Judaism, by Eliyahu Stern

2013[edit]

The winners were announced on April 9, 2013.[9][10]

2012[edit]

The winners were announced on February 15, 2012.[11]

  • Gold When They Come for Us, We’ll Be Gone: The Epic Struggle to Save Soviet Jewry, by Gal Beckerman
  • Silver Moses Montefiore: Jewish Liberator, Imperial Hero, by Abigail Green
  • The Benderly Boys and American Jewish Education, by Jonathan B. Krasner
  • The Most Musical Nation: Jews and Culture in the Late Russian Empire, by James Loeffler
  • A Thousand Darknesses: Lies and Truth in Holocaust Fiction, by Ruth Franklin

2011[edit]

The winners were announced on March 24, 2011.[12]

2010[edit]

The winners were announced on January 26, 2010. The judges were unable to decide on the top honour, so the prize was shared and the runner-up prize eliminated.[13]

  • Gold Jewish Renaissance in the Russian Revolution, by Kenneth B. Moss
  • Gold Plumes: Ostrich Feathers, Jews, and a Lost World of Global Commerce, by Sarah Abrevaya Stein
  • Station Identification: A Cultural History of Yiddish Radio in the United States, by Ari Y. Kelman
  • Surprised by God: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Religion, by Danya Ruttenberg
  • Speaking of Jews: Rabbis, Intellectuals, and the Creation of an American Public Identity, by Lila Corwin Berman

2009[edit]

The winners were announced on March 25, 2009.[14][15]

2008[edit]

The winners were announced on February 13, 2008.[16][17]

2007[edit]

The winners were announced in March 2007.[18][19]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Dennis Hevesi (August 10, 2012). "Sami Rohr, Jewish Philanthropist Remembered by a Writing Prize, Dies at 86". New York Times. Retrieved January 23, 2013.
  2. ^ Jessica Weinberg (March 15, 2013). "A Dispatch from the National Jewish Book Awards Ceremony". Tablet. Retrieved November 11, 2013.
  3. ^ "2017 Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature Fellows Announced". Facebook: Jewish Book Council. April 3, 2017. Retrieved May 3, 2017.
  4. ^ "Idra Novey wins Sami Rohr prize for Jewish literature". Jewish Telegraphic Agency. May 3, 2017. Retrieved May 3, 2017.
  5. ^ "Sami Rohr Prize 2015". Jewish Book Council. Retrieved January 24, 2015.
  6. ^ "Ayelet Tsabari Wins Sami Rohr Prize". The Jewish Daily Forward. February 23, 2015.
  7. ^ Adam Chandler (November 7, 2013). "'The Aleppo Codex' Nabs the Sami Rohr Prize". Tablet. Retrieved November 11, 2013.
  8. ^ Beth Kissileff (January 23, 2014). "2014 Sami Rohr Prize Awarded In Jerusalem". Tablet.
  9. ^ Joe Winkler (April 10, 2013). "Novelist Francesca Segal wins Sami Rohr Prize with 'The Innocents'". Jewish Telegraphic Agency. Retrieved November 11, 2013.
  10. ^ "2013 Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature" (Press release). Jewish Book Council. April 9, 2013. Retrieved November 11, 2013.
  11. ^ "Gal Beckerman Wins $100,000 Sami Rohr Prize". Publishers Weekly. February 15, 2012.
  12. ^ Marcy Oster (March 24, 2011). "Austin Ratner wins Rohr prize for first novel". Jewish Telegraphic Agency. Retrieved November 11, 2013.
  13. ^ "2010 Sami Rohr Prize Winners Announced". Jewish Book Council. January 26, 2010. Retrieved November 11, 2013.
  14. ^ "Sana Krasikov wins Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature". The Jerusalem Post. March 25, 2009. Retrieved November 11, 2013.
  15. ^ "Sami Rohr Prize 2009". Jewish Book Council. Retrieved November 11, 2013.
  16. ^ Sarah Crown (February 13, 2008). "Exile's tale takes $100,000 Jewish book prize". The Guardian. Retrieved November 11, 2013.
  17. ^ "Sami Rohr Prize 2008". Jewish Book Council. Retrieved November 11, 2013.
  18. ^ Juliet Lapidos (March 30, 2007). "A Chat With Tamar Yellin, Winner of New Fiction Prize". The Jewish Daily Forward. Retrieved November 11, 2013.
  19. ^ "Sami Rohr Prize 2007". Jewish Book Council. Retrieved November 11, 2013.

External links[edit]