1993 Serbian parliamentary election

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1993 Serbian parliamentary election
Serbia
← 1992 19 December 1993 1997 →

All 250 seats in the National Assembly
126 seats needed for a majority
Turnout61.34%
Party Leader % Seats ±
SPS Slobodan Milošević 36.65 123 +22
DEPOS Vuk Drašković 16.64 45 +13
SRS Vojislav Šešelj 13.85 39 -40
DS Dragoljub Mićunović 11.57 29 +23
DSS Vojislav Koštunica 5.07 7 New
VMDK András Ágoston 2.61 5 -4
PVDDPS 0.68 2 New
This lists parties that won seats. See the complete results below.
Prime Minister before Prime Minister after
Nikola Šainović
SPS
Mirko Marjanović
SPS
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Parliamentary elections were held in the Republic of Serbia on 19 December 1993.[1] The Socialist Party of Serbia (SPS) emerged as the largest party in the National Assembly, winning 123 of the 250 seats. The SPS formed a government with New Democracy, which had run as part of the Democratic Movement of Serbia coalition.

The elections were boycotted by political parties of ethnic Kosovo Albanians, who made up about 17% of the population.[2]

Results[edit]

Party Votes % Seats +/–
Socialist Party of Serbia 1,576,287 36.65 123 +22
Democratic Movement of Serbia 715,564 16.64 45 –5
Serbian Radical Party 595,467 13.85 39 –34
Democratic Party 497,582 11.57 29 +23
Democratic Party of Serbia 218,056 5.07 7 New
Democratic Fellowship of Vojvodina Hungarians 112,342 2.61 5 –4
Party for Democratic ActionDemocratic Party of Albanians 29,342 0.68 2 New
Invalid/blank votes 555,800
Total 4,300,440 100 250 0
Registered voters/turnout 7,010,385 61.34
Source: B92

Seats[edit]

Serbian Parliament 1993.png

  SPS  (123)
  DEPOS  (45)
  SRS  (39)
  DS  (29)
  DSS  (7)

Notes[edit]

The DEPOS was a coalition of:

References[edit]

  1. ^ Janusz Bugajski (2002) Political Parties of Eastern Europe: A Guide to Politics in the Post-Communist Era, p435
  2. ^ Oko izbora 1 (PDF). CeSID. 1997.