Simone Giertz

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Simone Giertz
SimoneGiertz presenting.jpg
Simone Giertz presenting her robot that feeds her cereal, at the Palace of Fine Arts (Innovation Hangar) in San Francisco, 2016
Born Simone Luna Louise Söderlund Giertz[1]
(1990-11-01) 1 November 1990 (age 27)[1]
Residence San Francisco, California
Occupation Maker, robotics enthusiast, YouTube vlogger
Parent(s) Caroline Giertz
Website http://simonegiertz.com/

Simone Luna Louise Söderlund Giertz (Swedish: [jæʈʂ]; born 1 November 1990),[1] better known as Simone Giertz, is a Swedish inventor, maker, robotics enthusiast, TV host, and professional YouTuber.[2] She has also previously worked in MMA sports journalism, and was an editor for Sweden's official website Sweden.se.[3] She has over 1 million subscribers on her YouTube channel.

Biography[edit]

Giertz has named the Disney cartoon character Gyro Gearloose as one of her earliest inspirations. She studied engineering physics in college but dropped out after a year.[4] She started creating "useless" inventions after studying at Hyper Island in Stockholm, where she was inspired by the local open-source hardware community.[5] Giertz's interest in electronics began in 2013; she made a toothbrush helmet for a children's show pilot episode on electronics, which was uploaded to YouTube after not being picked up, starting her YouTube career.[4]

Giertz brands herself as "the queen of shitty robots" and runs a YouTube channel where she employs deadpan humor to demonstrate mechanical robots of her own creation to automate everyday tasks; despite working from a purely mechanical standpoint, they often fall short of practical usefulness, for comic effect.[6] Giertz's creations have included an alarm clock that slaps the user,[7] a lipstick applier,[8] and one that shampoos the user's hair.[4] When building her robots, Giertz does not aim to make something useful, instead coming up with excessive solutions to potentially automatable situations.[9]

In 2016, Giertz joined Tested.com, collaborating with Adam Savage on her first project, the Popcorn Feeding Helmet.[10] In 2017, she hosted the comedy TV show Manick with Nisse Hallberg on Swedish TV6. The basic premise of the show is that the hosts invent funny creative solutions to everyday problems.

Family and personal life[edit]

As of July 2016, Giertz lives in San Francisco.[11]

The Giertz family surname is of Low German origin. She is the daughter of Caroline Giertz, novelist and TV host, who Giertz describes as a "ghostbuster" due to her mother's work on paranormal reality TV show Det Okända. Giertz is a descendant of Ericsson founder Lars Magnus Ericsson.[12] Lutheran theologian and bishop Bo Giertz was her great-great-uncle.[citation needed]

At the age of 16, Giertz spent a year in China as an exchange student. She stayed in Hefei, where she learned basic Mandarin. During her stay in China she also made an appearance on a Chinese sitcom called Huan Xi Long Xia Dang (Chinese: 欢喜龙虾档, the Happy Lobster Restaurant), where she played Catherine, a Canadian girl who married a Chinese man.[13]

Giertz also briefly attended the Swedish Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), studying physics.[14]

On April 30, 2018, Giertz announced via YouTube that she had been diagnosed with a noncancerous brain tumor[15]. After surgery to remove the grade I meningioma on May 30, 2018, she has continued to post humorous and upbeat accounts of her post-surgery progress, including photos of her "potential super-villain scar"[16] and a public address video on her Patreon account.[17]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Simone Söderlund Giertz fyller år den 1 November". Birthday.se (in Swedish). Archived from the original on 14 September 2016. Retrieved 5 September 2016. 
  2. ^ "Simone Giertz - YouTube". Archived from the original on 27 November 2016. Retrieved 4 April 2017. 
  3. ^ Khan, Asif (3 March 2016). "Simone Giertz, The Patron Saint of Bad Robots". Inquisitr.com. Retrieved 21 March 2016. 
  4. ^ a b c Godlewski, Nina (1 June 2016). "This self-taught engineer invents robots designed to fail hilariously at their jobs". Tech Insider. Retrieved 22 August 2016. 
  5. ^ Sanusi, Victoria (May 20, 2016). "This is Simone Giertz, aka the "Queen of Shitty Robots", a 25-year-old inventor from Stockholm, Sweden". BuzzFeed News. Retrieved April 18, 2018. She said she came up with the idea of making ridiculous inventions while studying at an advertising school called Hyper Island. She came across an open-source hardware community and "immediately fell in love with it". 
  6. ^ Jamieson, Amber (17 March 2016). "Meet the queen of useless robots: 'The internet is a weird place'". The Guardian. Retrieved 20 March 2016. 
  7. ^ Nsubuga, Jimmy (15 November 2015). "New alarm clock wakes you up with a slap in the face". Metro. Retrieved 22 August 2016. 
  8. ^ Hannah Withers (7 January 2016). "This brilliant woman made a lipstick robot". The Daily Dot. Retrieved 22 August 2016. 
  9. ^ Rutkin, Aviva (22 March 2016). "The many reasons why we love useless robots". New Scientist. Retrieved 22 August 2016. 
  10. ^ "Simone Giertz Joins "Tested," Builds Popcorn Feeding Helmet". Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers. Retrieved 2016-04-07. 
  11. ^ "Got photo bombed by Neil deGrasse Tyson". Reddit. 23 July 2016. Retrieved 23 July 2016. live in San Francisco since a couple of weeks back! 
  12. ^ "Simone Giertz: "The Making of Sh*tty Robots" - Talks at Google". YouTube. 
  13. ^ "THE WORST DAY OF MY LIFE: When I was on a Chinese sitcom". YouTube. Retrieved Jun 24, 2016. 
  14. ^ "LinkedIn Profile: Simone Giertz". LinkedIn. Retrieved March 23, 2017. [dead link]
  15. ^ Giertz, Simone. "I have a brain tumor". 
  16. ^ Bryan, Chloe (June 4, 2018). "YouTuber Simone Giertz posts photo of 'super villain scar' after brain surgery". Mashable. Retrieved July 12, 2018. In true Simone Giertz form, Simone Giertz underwent brain surgery last Wednesday, and she's already cracking jokes. The YouTuber and "Shitty Robots" creator, who announced she had a non-malignant brain tumor in April, shared her first post-op photo update on Monday, uploading a picture of her surgical scar to Twitter. 
  17. ^ Giertz, Simone (June 4, 2018). "You have one new message". Retrieved July 14, 2018. 

External links[edit]