Strange Horizons

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Strange Horizons
Strangehorizons.jpg
Editor-in-chiefVanessa Rose Phin
Former editorsJane Crowley
Kate Dollarhyde
Niall Harrison
Susan Marie Groppi
Mary Anne Mohanraj
CategoriesSpeculative fiction
FrequencyWeekly
FounderMary Anne Mohanraj
First issueSeptember 2000 (2000-09)
LanguageEnglish
Websitestrangehorizons.com
OCLC56474213

Strange Horizons is an online speculative fiction magazine. It also features speculative poetry and nonfiction in every issue, including reviews, essays, interviews, and roundtables.

History and profile[edit]

It was launched in September 2000, and publishes new material (fiction, articles, reviews, poetry, and/or art) 51 weeks of the year, with an emphasis on "new, underrepresented, and global voices."[1] The magazine was founded by writer and editor Mary Anne Mohanraj.[2] It has a staff of approximately fifty volunteers, and is unusual among professional speculative fiction magazines in being funded entirely by donations, holding annual fund drives.

Awards[edit]

Susan Marie Groppi won the World Fantasy Special Award: Non-Professional in 2010 for her work as Editor-in-Chief on Strange Horizons.[3] The magazine itself was a finalist for the Best Website Hugo Award in 2002[4] and 2005,[5] and for the Hugo Award for Best Semiprozine every year from 2013 through 2018.

The short story "The House Beyond Your Sky" by Benjamin Rosenbaum, published in 2006[6] in the magazine, was nominated for a 2007 Hugo Award for Best Short Story.[7] "Selkie Stories Are For Losers" by Sofia Samatar was nominated for a Hugo Award for Best Short Story in 2014. Other stories in Strange Horizons have been nominated for the Nebula and other awards.[8] Three stories published in Strange Horizons have won the Theodore Sturgeon Award.

Editors-in-chief[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Phin, Vanessa Rose (March 20, 2019). "Fond Farewells". Strange Horizons.
  2. ^ Walter, Damien (June 13, 2014). "A digital renaissance for the science fiction short story". The Guardian.
  3. ^ Locus Publications (2010-10-31). "Locus Online News » World Fantasy Awards Winners". Locusmag.com. Retrieved 2014-07-15.
  4. ^ "2002 Hugo Awards". The Hugo Awards. 2002-09-02. Retrieved 2014-07-15.
  5. ^ "2005 Hugo Awards". The Hugo Awards. Retrieved 2014-07-15.
  6. ^ Elena, Lara. "Strange Horizons Fiction: The House Beyond Your Sky, by Benjamin Rosenbaum, illustration by Vladimir Vitkovsky". Strangehorizons.com. Retrieved 2014-07-15.
  7. ^ "2007 Hugo Awards". The Hugo Awards. Retrieved 2014-07-15.
  8. ^ "Strange Horizons Awards". Strangehorizons.com. 2012-07-09. Retrieved 2014-07-15.
  9. ^ Harrison, Niall (April 3, 2017). "Moving On". Strange Horizons. Retrieved April 9, 2017.
  10. ^ Glyer, Mike (3 April 2017). "Strange Horizons Announces New Editors-in-Chief". File 770. Retrieved 14 April 2017.
  11. ^ Phin, Vanessa Rose (March 20, 2019). "Fond Farewells". Strange Horizons. Retrieved March 21, 2019.

External links[edit]