Svetlana Parkhomenko

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Svetlana Parkhomenko
Full nameSvetlana Germanovna Parkhomenko
Country (sports) Soviet Union
 Russia
Born (1962-10-08) October 8, 1962 (age 56)
Moscow, USSR
Retired1995
Prize money208,184
Singles
Career record124–93
Career titles3 ITF
Highest rankingNo. 72 (January 30, 1989)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open2R (1984)
French Open1R
Wimbledon3R (1984)
US Open1R
Doubles
Career record209–79
Career titles8 WTA, 17 ITF
Highest rankingNo. 8 (January 18, 1988)
Grand Slam Doubles results
Australian Open2R (1984)
French OpenQF (1986)
WimbledonSF (1987)
US Open3R (1987)
Tour FinalsSF (March 1986)

Svetlana Germanovna Parkhomenko (Светлана Германовна Паркхоменко, née Cherneva, Чернева; born October 8, 1962) is a retired Soviet and Russian tennis player and tennis coach. She was a winner of the Soviet singles tennis championships in 1985 and 9 times Soviet champion in women's doubles and mixed doubles. On the international level, she was the winner of the 1983 European amateur championships in women's and mixed doubles, bronze medalist of the 1983 Universiade in women's and mixed doubles, and winner of 8 WTA doubles tournaments. Parkhomenko is the recipient of 1988 WTA Sportsmanship Award.

Biography[edit]

Svetlana Cherneva started playing tennis when she was 8 years old. Her first coach was the famous pre-war Soviet champion and coach Nina Teplyakova. In 1978 Svetlana won the singles and doubles title at European Junior Championships (she also won doubles titles in the next two years). In 1978 she won the Soviet youth championships in singles, girls' and mixed doubles, and in 1980 in singles and girls' doubles. In 1980 she advanced with the Soviet girls team to the finals of Princess Sofia Cup.

Starting in 1981 Svetlana (from 1984 playing under her marriage name Parkhomenko) won the senior Sovier doubles championships eight times (twice in 1987). In addition, she became the singles champion in 1985 and mixed doubles champion in 1983. From 1981 she also played for the Soviet Union Federation Cup team. In total between 1981 and 1988 she played 28 rubbers for the Soviet team, mostly in doubles with Larisa Savchenko.

In 1983 Svetlana Cherneva won the European amateur championships in women's and mixed doubles and took bronze in the same disciplines at the 1983 Summer Universiade. From the same year she started playing in international professional tennis tournaments. In 1984 she won her first ITF titles is San Antonio and Delray Beach, and at the Wimbledon Championships advanced with Savchenko to quarterfinals after defeating 3rd seed Kathy Horvath and Virginia Ruzici, as well as Chris Evert and Catherine Tanvier. In the next three years Parkhomenko and Savchenko won seven Virginia Slims tournaments including four in 1987. They played three times in a row at the Virginia Slims Championships and in March 1986 advanced there to semifinals. In 1987 they reached Wimbledon semifinals after defeating world's best pair, recent Grand Slam winners Martina Navratilova and Pam Shriver.

At the start of 1988 season Svetlana Parkhomenko was ranked as high as 8th in the WTA doubles rankings. But in 1988 Larisa Savchenko broke with her to play doubles with young Natasha Zvereva. Without Savchenko, Parhomenko struggled to retain her best shape playing with other partners. She won one WTA tournament with Natalia Bykova and twice reached finals with Leila Meskhi, and at the end of the season she received WTA Sportsmanship Award.[1]

After having completely missed 1989 season, Parkhomenko returned to play at the end 1990. In 1991 she was awarded the title of Honoured Master of Sports, becoming one of the last Soviet tennis players who received this title. In 1992 she returned to the Top 10 of the Russian tennis and remained there for two more years. In 1993 she played three ties for the Russia Fed Cup team, winning her doubles games against Ukrainians and Lithuanians. After finishing her playing career in 1995 she coaches at the Moscow CSKA tennis club.

Virginia Slims and WTA finals[edit]

Doubles (14)[edit]

Winner (8)[edit]

Legend
Grand Slam (0)
WTA Tour Championship (0)
Tier IV-V (1)
VS circuit (7)
No. Date Championship Surface Partnering Opponents in final Score
1. 1 April 1985 Seabrook Island, South Carolina, USA Clay Soviet Union Larisa Savchenko United States Elise Burgin
United States Lori McNeil
6–1, 6–3
2. 9 September 1985 Salt Lake City, USA Hard Soviet Union Larisa Savchenko South Africa Beverly Mould
South Africa Rosalyn Fairbank
7–5, 6–2
3. 3 November 1986 Little Rock, Arkansas, USA Carpet (i) Soviet Union Larisa Savchenko Czechoslovakia Iva Budařová
United States Beth Herr
6–2, 1–6, 6–1
4. 21 January 1987 Wichita, Kansas, USA Carpet (i) Soviet Union Larisa Savchenko United States Barbara Potter
United States Wendy White
6–2, 6–4
5. 9 February 1987 Oklahoma City, USA Hard Soviet Union Larisa Savchenko United States Lori McNeil
United States Kim Sands
6–4, 6–4
6. 16 February 1987 Boca Raton, Florida, USA Hard Soviet Union Larisa Savchenko United States Chris Evert
United States Pam Shriver
6–0, 3–6, 6–2
7. 15 June 1987 Eastbourne, United Kingdom Grass Soviet Union Larisa Savchenko South Africa Rosalyn Fairbank
Australia Elizabeth Smylie
7–6(7–5), 4–6, 7–5
8. 29 February 1988 Wichita, USA (2) Hard (i) Soviet Union Natalia Bykova Czechoslovakia Jana Novotná
France Catherine Suire
6–3, 6–4

Runner-up (6)[edit]

No. Date Championship Surface Partnering Opponents in final Score
1. 21 January 1985 Key Biscayne, Florida, USA Hard Soviet Union Larisa Savchenko United States Kathy Jordan
Australia Elizabeth Smylie
4–6, 6–7
2. 8 April 1985 Hilton Head Island, USA Clay Soviet Union Larisa Savchenko South Africa Rosalyn Fairbank
United States Pam Shriver
4–6, 1–6
3. 22 September 1986 Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA Hard Soviet Union Larisa Savchenko United States Camille Benjamin
South Africa Dinky Van Rensburg
6–7, 5–7
4. 29 September 1986 New Orleans, USA Hard Soviet Union Larisa Savchenko United States Candy Reynolds
United States Anne Smith
3–6, 6–3, 3–6
5. 18 April 1988 Singapore Hard Soviet Union Leila Meskhi Soviet Union Natalia Bykova
Soviet Union Natalia Medvedeva
6–7, 3–6
6. 6 June 1988 Birmingham, United Kingdom Grass Soviet Union Leila Meskhi Soviet Union Larisa Savchenko
Soviet Union Natasha Zvereva
4–6, 1–6

ITF Finals[edit]

Singles Finals: (3-5)[edit]

$100,000 tournaments
$75,000 tournaments
$50,000 tournaments
$25,000 tournaments
$10,000 tournaments
Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Opponent in the final Score in the final
Runner–up 1. 16 January 1984 Delray Beach, United States Hard United States Anna Ivan 3-6, 3-6
Winner 2. 27 April 1992 Sheffield, United Kingdom Hard Australia Angie Woolcock 6-3, 4-6, 6-4
Runner–up 3. 19 October 1992 Moscow, Russia Clay Russia Elena Makarova 5-7, 2-6
Runner–up 4. 8 February 1993 Sunderland, United Kingdom Carpet Netherlands Gaby Coorengel 6-3, 6-7(3-7), 3-6
Runner–up 5. 3 May 1993 Bracknell, United Kingdom Hard Sweden Marianne Vallin 7-6(7-3), 3-6, 1-6
Winner 6. 27 September 1993 Bracknell, United Kingdom Hard United Kingdom Julie Pullin 7-5, 6-2
Winner 7. 4 October 1993 Basingstoke, United Kingdom Hard United Kingdom Emily Bond 2-6, 6-3, 6-0
Runner–up 8. 8 November 1993 Swindon, United Kingdom Carpet United Kingdom Emily Bond 5-7, 3-6

Doubles Finals: (17-5)[edit]

Outcome NO Date Tournament Surface Partner Opponents in the final Score
Runner–up 1. 2 January 1984 Chicago, United States Hard Soviet Union Larisa Neiland Switzerland Csilla Bartos-Cserepy
Netherlands Marianne van der Torre
W/O
Winner 2. 9 January 1984 San Antonio, United States Hard Soviet Union Elena Eliseenko United States Carol Christian
United States Jaime Kaplan
6-1, 6-1
Winner 3. 16 January 1984 Delray Beach, United States Hard United States Jaime Kaplan United States Carol Christian
United States Jamie Golder
6-3, 6-1
Runner–up 4. 23 March 1992 Santander, Spain Clay United Kingdom Amanda Evans Poland Agata Werblińska
Poland Katarzyna Teodorowicz
3-6, 3-6
Runner–up 5. 27 April 1992 Sheffield, United Kingdom Clay United Kingdom Amanda Evans Australia Lisa McShea
United States Amy deLone
4-6, 1-6
Winner 6. 11 May 1992 Bournemouth, United Kingdom Hard United Kingdom Amanda Evans United States Amy deLone
United Kingdom Tamsin Wainwright
6-3, 2-6, 6-4
Winner 7. 19 October 1992 Moscow, Russia Hard (i) Russia Natalia Egorova Russia Elena Likhovtseva
Russia Julia Lutrova
6–4, 4–6, 6–4
Winner 8. 1 February 1993 Newcastle, United Kingdom Carpet Russia Natalia Egorova Czech Republic Pavlína Rajzlová
Czech Republic Helena Vildová
6-4, 4-6, 6-0
Winner 9. 8 February 1993 Sunderland, United Kingdom Carpet Russia Natalia Egorova Czech Republic Pavlína Rajzlová
Czech Republic Helena Vildová
2-6, 6-1, 7-6(5)
Winner 10. 19 April 1993 Nottingham, United Kingdom Hard Russia Natalia Egorova United Kingdom Julie Salmon
United Kingdom Lorna Woodroffe
5-1 RET
Winner 11. 3 May 1993 Bracknell, United Kingdom Hard Russia Natalia Egorova United Kingdom Claire Taylor
United Kingdom Lorna Woodroffe
7-6, 6-1
Winner 12. 12 July 1993 Frinton-on-Sea, United Kingdom Grass Russia Natalia Egorova Australia Maija Avotins
Australia Lisa McShea
4-6 6-2 7-6(5)
Runner–up 13. 20 September 1993 Sheffield, United Kingdom Hard Russia Natalia Egorova United Kingdom Caroline Hunt
United Kingdom Shirli-Ann Siddall
4-6, 5-7
Winner 14. 4 October 1993 Basingstoke, United Kingdom Hard Russia Natalia Egorova Netherlands Caroline Stassen
United Kingdom Lorna Woodroffe
6-2, 6-1
Winner 15. 8 November 1993 Swindon, United Kingdom Carpet Russia Natalia Egorova Australia Alison Smith
Netherlands Caroline Stassen
6-0, 6-4
Winner 16. 15 November 1993 Swansea, United Kingdom Hard Russia Natalia Egorova Australia Alison Smith
Netherlands Caroline Stassen
6-1, 6-3
Winner 17. 29 November 1993 Ramat HaSharon, Israel Hard Russia Natalia Egorova Germany Angela Kerek
Ukraine Olga Lugina
6-2, 6-3
Winner 18. 4 July 1994 Felixstowe, United Kingdom Grass Russia Natalia Egorova Netherlands Caroline Stassen
United Kingdom Lorna Woodroffe
6-3, 7-5
Runner–up 19. 11 July 1994 Frinton-on-Sea, United Kingdom Grass Russia Natalia Egorova United Kingdom Helen Crook
United Kingdom Victoria Davies
3-6, 2-6
Winner 20. 14 November 1994 Eastbourne, United Kingdom Carpet Russia Natalia Egorova United Kingdom Shirli-Ann Siddall
United Kingdom Amanda Wainwright
7-6(10-8), 7-6(8-6)
Winner 21. 6 February 1995 Sheffield, United Kingdom Hard Russia Natalia Egorova United Kingdom Amanda Wainwright
United Kingdom Lorna Woodroffe
6-4, 6-2
Winner 22. 13 February 1995 Sunderland, United Kingdom Hard Russia Natalia Egorova United Kingdom Michele Mair
Republic of Ireland Karen Nugent
7-5, 6-0

References[edit]

  1. ^ WTA Awards Archived 2011-08-11 at the Wayback Machine at the WTA website

External links[edit]

Awards
Preceded by
Australia Anne Minter
Karen Krantzcke Sportsmanship Award
1988
Succeeded by
United States Gretchen Magers