Catherine Tanvier

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Catherine Tanvier
Country (sports)  France
Born (1965-05-28) 28 May 1965 (age 52)
Toulouse, France
Height 1.74 m (5 ft 8 12 in)
Plays Right-handed (double-handed backhand)
Singles
Career record 205–198
Career titles 1
Highest ranking No. 20 (27 September 1984)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open 4R (1989, 1990, 1991)
French Open 4R (1983, 1988)
Wimbledon 4R (1985)
US Open 2R (1981, 1983, 1984, 1986)
Doubles
Career record 285–180
Career titles 9
Highest ranking No. 16 (21 December 1986)
Grand Slam Doubles results
Australian Open QF (1980, 1989)
French Open SF (1983)
Wimbledon QF (1986)
US Open 3R (1984)
Grand Slam Mixed Doubles results
Australian Open 2R (1988)
Wimbledon 3R (1983, 1985)
US Open 2R (1984)

Catherine ("Cathy") Tanvier (born 28 May 1965) is a former tennis player from France who was active in the 1980s and the first half of the 1990s. She peaked at number 20 in 1984, and won one singles and nine doubles titles on the WTA Tour.

Career[edit]

In 1982, Tanvier became Wimbledon girls' singles champion after defeating first-seeded Helena Suková in the final in straight sets.[1]

Tanvier won one singles title on the WTA tour at the 1983 Freiburg Open clay court tournament, defeating Laura Arraya in the final in straight sets.

At the Wimbledon Championships she reached the fourth round in the singles event in 1985, which she lost to eight-seeded Zina Garrison.[2] Reaching the fourth round was also her best singles result at the Australian Open (1989, 1990, 1991) and French Open (1983, 1988).[3] Her best career result at a Grand Slam tournament was reaching the semifinal of the 1983 French Open women's doubles event with Ivanna Madruga.

Tanvier published two biographies; in 2007 she wrote Déclassée – de Roland-Garros au RMI,[a][4] and in 2013 published Détraquements, de la colère à la torpeur.[5][6]

In 2010, she made her debut as an actress in Jean-Luc Godard's Film Socialisme.

She now lives in Nice, France.

WTA Tour finals[edit]

Singles 4 (1 title, 3 runner-ups)[edit]

Legend
Grand Slam 0
WTA Championships 0
Tier I 0
Tier II 0
Tier III 0
Tier IV & V 0
Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Opponent Score
Winner 1. 17 July 1983 Freiburg, Germany Clay Peru Laura Arraya 6–4, 7–5
Runner-up 2. 30 October 1983 Filderstadt, Germany Carpet United States Martina Navratilova 1–6, 2–6
Runner-up 3. 5 October 1986 Hilversum, Netherlands Carpet Czech Republic Helena Suková 2–6, 5–7
Runner-up 4. 23 February 1992 Cesena, Italy Carpet France Mary Pierce 1–6, 1–6

Doubles 20 (7 titles, 12 runner-ups)[edit]

Legend
Grand Slam 0
WTA Championships 0
Tier I 0
Tier II 1
Tier III 0
Tier IV & V 2
Titles by Surface
Hard 1
Clay 4
Grass 0
Carpet 2
Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Partner Opponents Score
Winner 1. 18 July 1982 Monte Carlo, Monaco Clay Romania Virginia Ruzici Brazil Patricia Medrado
Brazil Cláudia Monteiro
7–6, 6–2
Winner 2. 8 August 1982 Indianapolis, US Clay Argentina Ivanna Madruga United States Joanne Russell
Romania Virginia Ruzici
7–5, 7–6
Runner-up 3. 9 May 1983 Perugia, Italy Clay Argentina Ivanna Madruga Romania Virginia Ruzici
United Kingdom Virginia Wade
3–6, 6–2, 1–6
Runner-up 4. 10 July 1983 Hittfeld, Germany Clay Argentina Ivanna Madruga West Germany Bettina Bunge
West Germany Claudia Kohde-Kilsch
5–7, 4–6
Runner-up 5. 30 October 1983 Filderstadt, Germany Carpet Romania Virginia Ruzici United States Martina Navratilova
United States Candy Reynolds
2–6, 1–6
Runner-up 6. 16 December 1984 Tokyo, Japan Carpet Australia Elizabeth Smylie West Germany Claudia Kohde-Kilsch
Czech Republic Helena Suková
4–6, 1–6
Runner-up 7. 19 May 1985 German Open, Germany Clay West Germany Steffi Graf West Germany Claudia Kohde-Kilsch
Czech Republic Helena Suková
4–6, 1–6
Winner 8. 11 November 1985 Hilversum, Netherlands Carpet (i) Netherlands Marcella Mesker Italy Sandra Cecchini
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Sabrina Goleš
6–2, 6–2
Runner-up 9. 13 April 1986 Hilton Head, US Clay West Germany Steffi Graf United States Chris Evert-Lloyd
United States Anne White
3–6, 3–6
Runner-up 10. 20 April 1986 Amelia Island, US Clay Argentina Gabriela Sabatini West Germany Claudia Kohde-Kilsch
Czech Republic Helena Suková
2–6, 7–5, 6–7
Runner-up 11. 19 October 1986 Hilversum, Netherlands Carpet (i) Denmark Tine Scheuer-Larsen United States Kathy Jordan
Czech Republic Helena Suková
5–7, 1–6
Runner-up 12. 26 October 1986 Brighton, UK Carpet (i) Denmark Tine Scheuer-Larsen West Germany Steffi Graf
Czech Republic Helena Suková
4–6, 4–6
Runner-up 13. 24 May 1987 European Open, Switzerland Clay Peru Laura Gildemeister United States Betsy Nagelsen
Australia Elizabeth Smylie
6–4, 4–6, 3–6
Runner-up 14. 25 October 1987 Brighton, UK Carpet (i) Denmark Tine Scheuer-Larsen United States Kathy Jordan
Czech Republic Helena Suková
5–7, 1–6
Winner 15. 17 July 1988 Nice, France Clay France Catherine Suire France Isabelle Demongeot
France Nathalie Tauziat
6–4, 4–6, 6–2
Winner 16. 24 July 1988 Aix-en-Provence, France Clay France Nathalie Herreman Italy Sandra Cecchini
Spain Arantxa Sánchez Vicario
6–4, 7–5
Winner 17. 22 October 1989 Bayonne, France Hard (i) Netherlands Manon Bollegraf South Africa Elna Reinach
Italy Raffaella Reggi
7–6, 7–5
Winner 18. 30 September 1990 Bayonne, France Hard (i) Australia Louise Field Australia Jo-Anne Faull
Australia Rachel McQuillan
7–6, 6–7, 7–6
Runner-up 19. 29 September 1991 Bayonne, France Carpet Australia Rachel McQuillan Argentina Patricia Tarabini
France Nathalie Tauziat
3–6, RET
Winner 20. 23 February 1992 Cesena, Italy Carpet France Catherine Suire Belgium Sabine Appelmans
Italy Raffaella Reggi
w/o

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ RMI stands for Revenu minimum d'insertion, a form of social welfare in France.

References[edit]

External links[edit]