TPS report

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A TPS report (Testing Procedure Specification) is a document used by a quality assurance group or individual, particularly in software engineering, that describes the testing procedures and the testing process.

Definition[edit]

The official definition and creation is provided by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) as follows:

IEEE 829 – Test Procedure Specification
The Test Procedures are developed from both the Test Design and the Test Case Specification. The document describes how the tester will physically run the test, the physical set-up required, and the procedure steps that need to be followed. The standard defines ten procedure steps that may be applied when running a test.[1]

In popular culture[edit]

After its use in the comedic 1999 film Office Space, "TPS report" has come to connote pointless, mindless paperwork,[2] and an example of "literacy practices" in the work environment that are "meaningless exercises imposed upon employees by an inept and uncaring management" and "relentlessly mundane and enervating".[3] According to the film's writer and director Mike Judge, the abbreviation stood for "Test Program Set" in the movie.[4] In the movie, multiple managers and coworkers inquire about a single error that Peter Gibbons makes in utilizing a wrong cover sheet to send his TPS reports. It is used by Gibbons as an example that he has eight different persons he directly reports to.

The 2015 puzzle video game Please, Don't Touch Anything featured the question 'What is a TPS Report?' as one of many hidden clues that lead to a unique ending.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "IEEE 829 Documentation". Archived from the original on 2016-03-04. Retrieved 2015-08-17.
  2. ^ Little, Steven S. (2008). The Milkshake Moment: Overcoming Stupid Systems, Pointless Policies and Muddled Management to Realize Real Growth. John Wiley & Sons. p. 51. ISBN 978-0-470-25746-3.
  3. ^ Williams, Bronwyn T.; Zenger, Amy A. (2007). Popular Culture and Representations of Literacy. Routledge/Taylor & Francis. p. 61. ISBN 978-0-415-36095-1.
  4. ^ Hoinski, Michael (2009-02-09). "Office Space' Cast Reunite at 10th Anniversary Screening of Mike Judge's Cult Film". Rolling Stone. Retrieved 2015-08-17.

External links[edit]