Tahir Jalil Habbush al-Tikriti

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Al-Tikriti showing photos of Abu Nidal's body, 2002.

Tahir Jalil Habbush al Takriti (Arabic: طاهر جليل حبوش التكريتي‎‎) is a former Iraqi intelligence official who served under the regime of Saddam Hussein; in 2001, he was Iraq's head of intelligence and as such, informed MI6 in January 2003 (shortly before the start of the Iraq War) that Iraq had no WMD.[1] He was the Jack of Diamonds in the most-wanted Iraqi playing cards[2] and is still a fugitive with up to $1 million reward for information leading to his capture.[3]

Forged 2003 Habbush letter[edit]

According to the London Sunday Telegraph, Mohamed Atta is mentioned in a letter allegedly discovered in Iraq handwritten by Tahir Jalil Habbush al Takriti, former chief of the Iraqi Intelligence Service. Habbush's July 1, 2001, memo is labeled "Intelligence Items" and is addressed: "To the President of the Ba'ath Revolution Party and President of the Republic, may God protect you." It continues:

’’Mohamed Atta, an Egyptian national, came with Abu Ammer [the real name behind this Arabic alias remains a mystery] and we hosted him in Abu Nidal's house at al-Dora under our direct supervision.’’
’’We arranged a work program for him for three days with a team dedicated to working with him...He displayed extraordinary effort and showed a firm commitment to lead the team which will be responsible for attacking the targets that we have agreed to destroy.’’ [4]

The memo is believed to be a forgery. According to Newsweek, "U.S. officials and a leading Iraqi document expert [say] the document is most likely a forgery, part of a thriving new trade in dubious Iraqi documents that has cropped up in the wake of the collapse of Saddam's regime."[5] In The Way of the World, author Ron Suskind alleges that the Bush administration itself ordered the forgery. Habbush then supposedly signed the letter, having already been resettled in Jordan with $5 million from the US.[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Richard Norton-Taylor. "MI6 and CIA heard Iraq had no active WMD capability ahead of invasion | World news". The Guardian. Retrieved 2015-11-04. 
  2. ^ "Iraq: The spies who fooled the world - BBC News". Bbc.co.uk. 2013-03-18. Retrieved 2015-11-04. 
  3. ^ https://web.archive.org/web/20130215223524/http://www.rewardsforjustice.net/index.cfm?page=Tahir&language=english. Archived from the original on February 15, 2013. Retrieved March 18, 2013.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  4. ^ [1] Archived May 13, 2008, at the Wayback Machine.
  5. ^ [2] Archived May 16, 2008, at the Wayback Machine.
  6. ^ Allen, Mike. "Book says White House ordered forgery". Politico. Retrieved 2015-11-04. 

External links[edit]