Talk:Bloodchild and Other Stories

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Possible Themes to add to the short story "Bloodchild" (LAGCC ENG103 student suggestions)[edit]

Parasitism[edit]

This article needs to have a theme on parasitism because we strongly believe that the Tlic are using the Terrans as host for their own benefit while the Terrans are not getting a significant benefit from the Tlic, from whats being done to them.--Jp writer347 (talk) 19:06, 14 March 2016 (UTC) --Gymlife (talk) 19:06, 14 March 2016 (UTC) --CheenaVero (talk) 19:06, 14 March 2016 (UTC)

Love[edit]

Love should be a theme that is added because in the story it comes down to love and trust of the Terrans and Tlics. Gan has to trust T'Gatoi to take care of him when the time comes for birth and be able to know that her love for him will not put him in any harm. T'Gatoi has to trust Gan's love to not kill her or the other Tlics.--Inspirational Beauty (talk) 19:08, 14 March 2016 (UTC)--Cempasuchil 86 (talk) 19:10, 14 March 2016 (UTC)--Andreina2 (talk) 19:11, 14 March 2016 (UTC)

Slavery[edit]

The article really needs a section on slavery because all of the other themes fall under it. examples, "paying the rent" , love , consent , the human body as commodity etc...--StudentSO8 (talk) 19:09, 14 March 2016 (UTC) Ramdres (talk) 19:12, 14 March 2016 (UTC)Look into my eye (talk) 19:13, 14 March 2016 (UTC)AprilGreeen (talk) 19:14, 14 March 2016 (UTC)

Rent[edit]

We feel the part about paying rent is very important to the story because it's basically Butler's views on what is happening in the story itself. Every other theme is our projection onto the story. Something she discusses in the introduction of Bloodchild.--Korny247 (talk) 19:20, 14 March 2016 (UTC)--PurpleYaya (talk) 19:20, 14 March 2016 (UTC) --Barcode158376 (talk) 19:21, 14 March 2016 (UTC)

Section on Love[edit]

I believe a section on love is needed because its the foundation of the story. Its very controversial topic whether T'Gatoi truly love Gan or vice versa. Love also have a sub topic Trust. Which brings up a lot of questions --OhhhRenneR (talk) 19:13, 14 March 2016 (UTC)--Figueroa Lea (talk) 19:14, 14 March 2016 (UTC)--Keyboredplease (talk) 19:14, 14 March 2016 (UTC)

Paying The Rent[edit]

The topic we believe that should be in this article is "paying the rent" because is it referenced over again over again without being directly pointed out throughout the story. We can argue that we both need each other in order to survive. The Terrans' need to pay the rent forward in order to survive because they lack the power to sustain themselves. The Tlic in return provide a roof over there head and keeping them save from danger which makes them the high power.--Blazingm0on1111 (talk) 19:23, 14 March 2016 (UTC)--Sallyyim16 (talk) 19:23, 14 March 2016 (UTC) RMANEK (talk) 19:27, 14 March 2016 (UTC)

Summaries of "Bloodchild"[edit]

First Draft[edit]

Octavia Butler’s "Bloodchild" is a short story in which describes an unusual bond between the Terran a colony of humans, who live amongst the Tilc alien lifeforms. Inhabiting the Tilc planet, male humans are used as hosts for Tilc children. Gan a young boy has come to the age where he will carry the children of T’Gatoi, the alien his mother has arranged for him. All his life Gan and his siblings, mainly his sister Hoa, perceived being a host as a privilege and having T’Gatoi around was wonderful for them. However when a man named Lomas is separated from his Tilc while pregnant, Gan is forced to help T’Gatoi perform surgery on the man to retrieve the alien children. After witnessing the horrendous process that a male Terran must go through to give birth to the Grubs, Gan begins to question whether or not he actually wants to pursue being host himself. His fear of being a host clouds his mind and pushes him to challenge T’Gatoi and the purpose of his people to the aliens. He soon finds himself doubting his worth as a human, and the relationship he had formed with T’Gatoi. However Gan soon realizes that he doesn’t have the selfishness to attempt to save himself from carrying the alien eggs. Despite being afraid of having to give birth and risking his life, Gan finds himself in a position where the love for his family as well as for T’Gatoi overpower his fear to become impregnated. --Figueroa Lea (talk) 20:18, 14 March 2016 (UTC)--Inspirational Beauty (talk) 20:20, 14 March 2016 (UTC) --OhhhRenneR (talk) 20:20, 14 March 2016 (UTC)--[[User:KeyboAngrykakapo (talk) 20:05, 28 March 2016 (UTC)redplease|Keyboredplease]] (talk) 20:20, 14 March 2016 (UTC) --CheenaVero (talk) 20:21, 14 March 2016 (UTC) --Jp writer347 (talk) 20:21, 14 March 2016 (UTC)

Second Draft[edit]

Octavia Butler’s "Bloodchild" is a short story in which describes an unusual bond between the Terran a colony of humans, who live amongst the Tilc alien lifeforms. Inhabiting the Tilc planet, male humans are used as hosts for Tilc children. Gan a young boy has come to the age where he will carry the children of T’Gatoi, the alien who has chosen him. All his life Gan and his siblings, except his brother Qui, perceived being a host as a privilege and having T’Gatoi around was wonderful for them. However when a man named Lomas is separated from his Tilc while pregnant, Gan is forced to help T’Gatoi perform surgery on the man to retrieve the alien children. After witnessing the horrendous process that a male Terran must go through to give birth to the Grubs, Gan begins to question whether or not he actually wants to pursue being host himself. Gan speaks with his brother about the horrors they both have witnessed. Qui tells Gan how he wants to get away and not be in the colony. His fear of being a host clouds his mind and pushes him to challenge T’Gatoi and the purpose of his people to the aliens. He soon finds himself doubting his worth as a human, and the relationship he had formed with T’Gatoi. Gan threatens to kill himself to not be impregnated, however he soon realizes that he doesn’t have the selfishness to attempt to save himself from carrying the alien eggs. Despite being afraid of having to give birth and risking his life, Gan finds himself in a position where the love for T’Gatoi overpowers his fear to become impregnated. CheenaVero (talk) 18:28, 4 April 2016 (UTC)PurpleYaya (talk) 18:29, 4 April 2016 (UTC)PurpleYayaAngrykakapo (talk) 18:38, 4 April 2016 (UTC)angrykakapo

Quotes[edit]

T'Gatoi, one of the lead Tlic, reassures Gan, a young male Terran chosen as her mate, as to the safety of their bonding: “I'm healthy and young,” she said. “I won’t leave you as Lomas was left alone, NTlic. I’ll take care of you"

Butler, "Bloodchild," 29.

Near the conclusion of the story T'Gatoi, a lead female T'lic, tries to convince Gan, a young male Terran chosen as her mate, about his commitment towards her and why he needs to fulfill it.


"About the And your ancestors, fleeing from their homeworld, from their own kind who would have killed or enslaved them—they survived because of us. We saw them as people and gave them the Preserve when they still tried to kill us as worms."

Butler, Bloodchild and Other Stories.

Third Draft[edit]

Octavia Butler’s "Bloodchild" is a short story in which describes an unusual bond between the Terran, a colony of humans, who live among the Tlic alien lifeforms. Inhabiting the Tlic planet, male humans are used as hosts for Tlic children. Gan, a young boy has come to the age where he will carry the children of T’Gatoi, the alien who has chosen him. All his life Gan and his siblings, except his brother Qui, perceived being a host as a privilege and having T’Gatoi around was wonderful for them. However, when a man named Lomas is separated from his Tlic while pregnant, Gan is forced to help T’Gatoi perform surgery on the man to retrieve the alien children. After witnessing the horrendous process that a male Terran must go through to give birth to the Grubs, Gan begins to question whether or not he actually wants to pursue being a host himself. Gan speaks with his brother about the horrors they both have witnessed. Qui tells Gan how he wants to get away and not be in the colony. Gan's fear of being a host clouds his mind and pushes him to challenge T’Gatoi and the purpose of his people to the aliens. He soon finds himself doubting his worth as a human, and the relationship he had formed with T’Gatoi. Gan then gets a gun that was hidden away and then threatens to kill himself to not be impregnated. Therefore, he realizes that he does not have the selfishness to attempt to save himself from carrying the alien eggs. T'Gatoi regains his trust by letting Gan keep the gun and trusting her life in his hands. T'Gatoi promises Gan that she will take care of him and will never leave him behind like Lomas who had been left in despair by the Tlic. Despite Gan being afraid of having to give birth and risking his life, he finds himself in a position where the love for T’Gatoi overpowers his fear to become impregnated.--Inspirational Beauty (talk) 18:56, 4 April 2016 (UTC) 146.111.144.130 (talk) 19:10, 4 April 2016 (UTC) 146.111.144.130 (talk) 19:46, 4 April 2016 (UTC)

Publication[edit]

Isaac Asimov ‘s Science Fiction Magazine in 1984. Jafar.majeedul (talk) 06:07, 23 May 2016 (UTC)

Summaries of "Near of Kin"[edit]

First Draft[edit]

Near of Kin by Octavia Butler is a short story that involves a discussion between a girl and her uncle. The girl’s mother has recently died and she is talking to her uncle about the lack of relationship that she had with her mother. She felt abandoned by her mother because she was left to be raised by her grandmother. There was a family secret that this girl was unaware of and this secret was the justification of her abandonment. What the girl did not know was that she was the product of her mom and uncle, so yes her uncle was also her father. Though this does not fully justify her mother neglecting her, it makes the situation more understanding yet at the same time it makes her relationship between her father/uncle disapproving. afphia148Afphia148 (talk) 20:17, 28 March 2016 (UTC) cempasuchil_86Cempasuchil 86 (talk) 20:21, 28 March 2016 (UTC)

Second Draft[edit]

Near of Kin by Octavia Butler is a short story that involves a discussion between a girl and her uncle. The girl’s mother has recently died and she is talking to her uncle about the lack of relationship that she had with her mother. She felt abandoned by her mother because she was left to be raised by her grandmother. There was a family secret that that the girl felt was the justification of her abandonment. She felt as if she was the product of her mom and uncle rather than her mom and previous husband, so yes her uncle was also her father. Comparing her looks and personality with that of her uncle, she was just waiting for the confirmation that she was his child. Though this does not fully justify her mother neglecting her, it makes the situation as a whole and her relationship between her father/uncle more understanding. --Afphia148 (talk) 18:16, 4 April 2016 (UTC)--Leah102 (talk) 18:16, 4 April 2016 (UTC) Jafar.majeedul (talk) 18:17, 4 April 2016 (UTC)

Quotes[edit]

““Maybe to feel superior in struggle was sensed, when people were aware to fight for identity.”

Butler, "Bloodchild," 29.


Rather than passing by the hate she has felt, the protagonist continues to negatively reminisce about her mother's abandonment, instead of allowing herself to overcome her past: “She’s dead.” said my uncle flatly. “How much more time and energy are you going to waste resenting her”

Butler, Near of Kin, 77.

“Wondering why he still bothered to defend her. What difference did it make now what I felt for her-- or didn’t feel.”

Butler, Near of Kin, 140.

Third Draft[edit]

In the short story “Near of Kin” a young woman sorts through her recently deceased mother’s belongings while discussing the lack of relationship they had with her uncle. The young woman always felt more of a connection with her uncle over anyone in the family. In terms of her looks and personality they were very much alike. While talking about her mother she expressed how she felt abandoned since she was left to be raised by her grandmother. However, little did she know that the neglect she faced as a child was because of a dark secret both her mother and uncle repressed.

Publication information and Awards[edit]

"Near of Kin" (in Chrysalis 4 1979; in Bloodchild and Other Stories, Four Walls Eight Windows 1995, Seven Stories Press 1996, 2005). — Preceding unsigned comment added by Blazingm0on1111 (talkcontribs) 20:19, 11 April 2016 (UTC)

Afterword[edit]

According to Octavia Butler, "Near of kin" has no influences from her short story Kindred. Butler explains that given her childhood with a Baptist background, most of her influences in "Near of Kind" came from her childhood. Butler illustrates that "Near of kind" had a rocky start during her college years. Stories from the bible enabled Butler to finish her work on "Near of kin". Butler states that the stories of Lot's daughters, Abraham's sister-wife, and the sons of Adam with the daughters of Eve, are that of incest and what influenced her the most in writing "Near of kin".

According to the Octavia Butler, "Near of kin" has no relation with the novel Kindred. Butler explains that her childhood of Baptist background influenced the writing of "Near of kin". Butler illustrates that "Near of kin" had a rocky start during her college years. Stories from the bible influenced Butler to explore different themes which gave her new ideas that would enable her to complete "Near of kin". The stories that mainly influenced butler in her writing were of Lot's daughters, Abraham's sister-wife, and the sons of Adam with the daughters of Eve; as these stories mostly dealt with incest.

Summaries of "Crossover"[edit]

Second Draft[edit]

The short story, "Crossover" is about a woman who has a lousy job working at a factory in which she hates and struggles with alcohol as well as staying with her criminal boyfriend. With her constant fear of loneliness and death, she suffers from low self esteem issues. During the 3 months that her boyfriend had been in jail she contemplated suicide many times but because of fear never went through with this plan. As the story continues, her actions and behavior become more self destructive, constantly visiting the liquor store and turning to alcohol to solve her life problems. She had been around drunks most of her life that she got used to this habit and the more she drank the less things would matter. Octavia Butler relates this story, written when she too was working in a factory, to her real life by stating that it was about her own fears of failing as a writer and not wanting to end up like this character.--Afphia148 (talk) 18:33, 4 April 2016 (UTC) --Leah102 (talk) 18:33, 4 April 2016 (UTC) Jafar.majeedul (talk) 18:43, 4 April 2016 (UTC)

Publication information and Awards[edit]

"Crossover" (Doubleday 1976; Avon 1979; Warner 1995; in Seed to Harvest, Grand Central Publishing 2007).

Quotes[edit]

"She had lived around drunks most of her life. She knew that if she could get enough down, nothing would matter"

Butler, Crossover, 119.

Summaries of "The Evening and The Morning and The Night"[edit]

First Draft[edit]

In the short story “The Evening and The Morning and The Night” takes place in a world that people were born with genetic issues called DGD (Duryea- Gode Disease). Humans can contract the disease with others and some are born with it. The main Character named Lynn who had gotten the disease from her parents tried to kill herself by committing suicide but failed. Lynn’s father also had the disease which he end up killing Lynn’s mother and later killing himself. Lynn had majored in biology in college. Lynn had to wear a special badge to keep herself save and others save. Lynn met Alan Chi at college and he too has the disease from both of his parents. They decided to go the place called Dilg to meet with Alan’s mother Naomi Chi.--Sallyyim16 (talk) 20:22, 28 March 2016 (UTC)Sallyyim16 Look into my eye (talk) 20:24, 28 March 2016 (UTC)look into my eye

Second Draft[edit]

"The Evening and the Morning and the Night." is a nonfiction story in which you in-visualize what it is is like for a genetic disease to impact individuals.The disease itself is characterized by signs of dementia, suicide and the need for self-mutilation, more-so because the affected individual wants to escape the prison they're in: their flesh. Introducing the main character Lynn Mortimer who is DGD positive and lived with two parents who were as well.The disease has no cure but only worsens , the life span is up to 40 years old .Having stayed late for graduation practice at school she came home to her parents mutilated and murdered , not by someone but by their very hands. That is where the character Alan is introduced ( who she forms a bond with), During her college life she begins living with other DGD afflicted people.StudentSO8 (talk) 20:19, 4 April 2016 (UTC) PurpleYaya (talk) 20:19, 4 April 2016 (UTC)PurpleYaya --CheenaVero (talk) 01:52, 11 April 2016 (UTC)

Third Draft[edit]

Lynn Mortimer has been afflicted with Duryea-Gode disease her entire life. Her troubled past includes a failed suicide at 15 years of age and a father who "drifted" causing him to murder her mother and taking his own life in the process. The disease itself is characterized by signs of dementia, suicide and the need for self-mutilation, more-so because the affected individual wants to escape the prison they're in: their flesh. During her college life she begins living with other DGD afflicted people. There she meets Alan, who she forms a bond with. Alan wants to meet her mother who is located at a Dilg, which is a maximum security DGD ward that houses several patients susceptible to being manipulated by pheromones. They learn at the Dilg that the patients aren't all walking monsters purposely following a path of chaos but instead are a treasure chest of undiscovered talent and potential. Lynn ends up joining Alan and meet with Beatrice, the “queen bee” of the facility. Alan and his mother are reunited after years of being separated and realizes that DGD affected patients are usually influenced by female pheromones. Both Alan and Lynn discover the harsh possibility that efforts to better the lives of those afflicted with the disease may be futile. Keyboredplease (talk) 18:25, 4 April 2016 (UTC)--Andreina2 (talk) 18:26, 4 April 2016 (UTC)Andreina2 Barcode158376 (talk) 18:27, 4 April 2016 (UTC) --Sallyyim16 (talk) 18:28, 4 April 2016 (UTC)Sallyyim16

Publication information and Awards[edit]

"The Evening and the Morning and the Night" (Omni Publications International1987; in Bloodchild and Other Stories, Four Walls Eight Windows 1995, Seven Stories Press 1996, 2005); Winner of Science Fiction Chronicle Reader Award; Nominated for Nebula Award for Best Novelette (1987).

Quotes[edit]

“The damn disease could be wiped out in one generation,” he said, “but people are still animals when it comes to breeding.”

Butler, The Evening and the Morning and the Night

The infected with (DGD) are known for self-mutilation and self harm. But some are willing for a change, instead of destroying they create to show the world, we can fight this disease: "They can create something beautiful, useful, even something worthless. But they create. They don't destroy."

Butler, The Evening and the Morning and the Night

--Andreina2 (talk) 17:51, 4 April 2016 (UTC)Andreina2Barcode158376 (talk) 17:52, 4 April 2016 (UTC) Keyboredplease (talk) 17:54, 4 April 2016 (UTC) --Sallyyim16 (talk) 17:56, 4 April 2016 (UTC)Sallyyim16

In The Evening and the Morning and the Night Lynn, the main character, discusses with her roommate Alan Chi about the Duryea-Gode Disease; they both have to deal with the disease. “The damn disease could be wiped out in one generation,” he said, “but people are still animals when it comes to breeding. Alan refers to people as animals when it comes to breeding because they know that this decease is transmittable from parent to child . A disease that is characterized by flesh-digging and the need of self mutilation. --Sallyyim16 (talk) 18:39, 11 April 2016 (UTC)Sallyyim16 Cempasuchil 86 (talk) 18:40, 11 April 2016 (UTC)

Summaries of "Speech Sounds"[edit]

First Draft[edit]

In Octavia Butler's short story "Speech Sounds", it portrays the life of a society that is withering away of its basic needs. The only way [now] of communicating is through gestures due to loss of verbal communication and basic education. The story starts off with a situation to help us envision the importance of communication. Rye lost her whole family to this "disease" and was considering suicide. She decided to then go on a journey in search of a brother whom she had not heard from. While on her journey, she boarded a bus where a fight then breaks out presenting a dangerous situation. Rye is forced to give off a gesture to protect herself due to fear of speaking. A police officer is then introduced into the situation and tries to restore order and then offers a ride in the safety of his own car. Despite the limited trust she has for him on anyone else, she takes the ride and then begins to share a bond with him. On their journey, they came across another dispute that ended with three deaths including the officer, a woman whom he had tried to help and a violent man. After this violent scene, the female victim's children set a different theme to the story. Rye speaks. AprilGreeen (talk) 20:17, 28 March 2016 (UTC) Jafar.majeedul (talk) 20:18, 28 March 2016 (UTC) StudentSO8 (talk) 20:19, 28 March 2016 (UTC)


RMANEK (talk) 17:57, 4 April 2016 (UTC)--Gymlife (talk) 17:57, 4 April 2016 (UTC)--Inspirational Beauty (talk) 17:58, 4 April 2016 (UTC)

146.111.144.130 (talk) 19:47, 4 April 2016 (UTC)

Second Draft[edit]

In the short story "Speech Sounds" by Octavia Butler, there was a girl named Rye which was going to travel across the city to get to a place called "Pasadena" which is where she wanted to travel to in order to visit a friend. While she is on her way to Pasadena, she is traveling there on a bus which is packed with people and she is sitting, Rye then notices two individuals continuously arguing and she senses sooner or later some type of altercation will outburst. Rye is still on the bus she and is about half way to her destination when a fight breaks out between the two individuals. One was a short male while the other was a tall male. The short male hit the tall male and he started bleeding. While this was going on a third guy got into the fight and it became a type of brawl in the bus. Rye then was looking over to the bus driver and could tell he was going to hit the breaks hard so she prepared herself for the bus to brake. Once that happened everybody started falling on top of each other which resulted in more arguing. The bus stopped and Rye quickly got out and was observing the situation when a car pulled up and a man got out. She wasn't sure who the man was but he did have a gun and possibly was a cop. The man then threw gas into the bus which resulted in everybody evacuating the bus and he had Rye helping individuals out. After the whole incident Rye found herself in the man's car. The whole situation is strange because Rye continues to mention some sort of disease and she is not talking with the man just making gestures. Later on they stop somewhere empty and start having sex. When they are finished Rye wants him to go with her but isn't sure the man accepts. While Rye was driving with the man they run into a male chasing a female with a knife. They stopped the car and both got out. The man that was chasing the girl stabbed her and Obsidian shot him. They went to check up on them and Obsidian was looking at the male he shot but he was still alive and took Obsidian's gun and killed him. Rye then killed the man. Two children were there and Rye did not want them at first but then she heard them speak. This gave her hope in life and took them to care for them. At the end of the story, she loses Obsidian but gained two children who can speak like her however are afraid to speak in front of her. In this world, people were envious of what other people’s abilities were. Her work finally got acknowledged. --Gymlife (talk) 18:08, 4 April 2016 (UTC)--Inspirational Beauty (talk) 146.111.144.130 (talk) 19:13, 4 April 2016 (UTC) 18:09, 4 April 2016 (UTC)

Third Draft[edit]

In "Speech Sounds", Octavia Butler explores a universe where a virus has eradicated speech. In this story there is a girl named Rye who is traveling across the city to get to Pasadena to visit a friend. She is taking a bus which is packed with people. Rye then notices two individuals arguing via grunting and exaggerated gestures. She senses that sooner or later some type of physical altercation will arise. Halfway to her destination a fight breaks out between the two individuals. One man hits another man and he starts to bleed, while this occurs, a third man gets involved with the fight and the bus breaks out into a brawl. The bus driver brings the bus to a sudden halt which causes everyone to fall on top of each other resulting in more quarrels. Once the doors open, Rye quickly leaves the scene to observe the situation. A car then approaches her and a man gets out. She is unsure who the man is, but she assumes that he may be a cop because he is armed and in uniform. This man takes action into his own hands to dissolve the altercation by throwing a gas bomb. This causes everybody to evacuate the bus. The man, Obsidian, an ex-cop, agrees to take Rye to Pasadena. Rye finds herself attracted to Obsidian and wants him to join her in Pasadena. While traveling they run into another altercation. A man is chasing a woman with a knife. Obsidian stops the car and both get out to confront the man. However, he had already stabbed the woman to death. Obsidian shoots the man to prevent any further harm. When he goes to observe the woman who had been stabbed, the man grabs his gun and shoots Obsidian in the head. Rye, who is armed herself, then shoots Obsidians’ murderer, killing him. Rye comes across the two children of the deceased woman. The children are not infected with the virus and are able to speak. Rye believes that the man who killed Obsidian, was the father of the children, and the woman was killed trying to protect her them from their father. Hearing them speak gave Rye hope for the future of humanity. Fledgealmanac (talk) 19:11, 4 April 2016 (UTC) AprilGreeen (talk) 19:17, 4 April 2016 (UTC)Blazingm0on1111 (talk) 19:18, 4 April 2016 (UTC) Samuels1993 (talk) 19:31, 4 April 2016 (UTC)


Quotes[edit]

After a final violent scene in " Speech Sounds " the introduction of the two Literate children signified a new beginning. “She had been a teacher. A good one. She had been a protector, to, though only of herself. She had kept herself alive when she had no reason to live. If the illness let these children alone, she could keep them alive”. A new found relationship with two orphans emerges.

Butler, Speech Sounds, 95.

As represented in thin the short story "Speech Sounds", a disease that heavily influences the population. Butler describes this pandemic as, "A new virus, a new pollutant, radiation, divine retribution….The illness was stroke-swift in the way it cut people down and stroke-like in some of its effects” (Butler 96). This disease affects people’s communication and Butler represents Rye as a woman who has the ability to speak and Obsidian a man who has the ability to read and write. “The illness, if it was an illness, had cut even the living off from one another.”

Butler, Speech Sounds, 96.

Summaries of "Amnesty"[edit]

In Amnesty afterword Butler explains the circumstances of how Amnesty came to life. She uses Dr. Wen Ho Lee’s negative experience with the US government when he was wrongfully imprisoned for espionage. In Amnesty, Noah is seen as a threat by the US government she is imprisoned and tortured in order to obtain information from her about the alien’s technology. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Cempasuchil 86 (talkcontribs) 19:21, 11 April 2016 (UTC)

First Draft[edit]

In this short story is about a young girl named noah who was kidnapped at a young age by some sort of advanced species in other words can be considered as aliens. Noah was later on released by these " aliens " and the united states government took noah for questioning, they kept noah for years trying to beat information out of her as to what happened to her etc. Eventually noah gets out and starts cooperating with the " aliens " where she then would get humans just like her for the aliens to operate experiments on them which did not hurt the humans. Noah gets six humans for the aliens and at time these humans are scared, angry, etc. The humans feel all types of emotions while the aliens perform there experiments on them and noah reassures them that if they want to live they must comply with the aliens, there testing, and what other needs the aliens have from the humans. The humans would comply with the " aliens " to whatever they wanted to do simply because they wanted to live, the humans did not resist what the aliens did because they were petrified as to what might happen to them if they decided to go against there rules. Overall you shouldn’t do what you wouldn’t want done to yourself but our human race doesn’t get that fully and she tried to pass that message along by showing us that the aliens found out what they were doing was hurting them, so they decided to stop the process. Barcode158376 (talk) 20:11, 28 March 2016 (UTC) --Gymlife (talk) 20:12, 28 March 2016 (UTC)--Samuels1993 (talk) 20:13, 28 March 2016 (UTC)19:15, 4 April 2016 (UTC)KileysMom (talk)

Second Draft[edit]

In Amnesty, Noah the main character is in the middle of a meeting with possible employees for the alien communities. The communities are an alien species that have taken over earth’s desert areas. Noah who was abducted by the communities when she was a child attempts to convince the group to overcome their fear of the aliens so they can prosper alongside the communities. Noah discusses and compares the experiences she had with both the communities and the humans. Despite being treated as an experiment and a lab rat by the aliens, Noah stated that she never once faced as much cruelty with the communities as she did with her own government. This contributed to Noah’s positive involvement with communities which gave her the power to take on the role of translator and collaborator between the two species. Noah has become one of thirty people to participate in the enfolding process with the communities which enforces her bond with them. It is because of her ability to communicate with both species that opens up the possibility of creating a more unified environment between humans and the communities. Figueroa Lea (talk) 19:10, 4 April 2016 (UTC) --OhhhRenneR (talk) 19:11, 4 April 2016 (UTC)Cempasuchil 86 (talk) 19:11, 4 April 2016 (UTC)

Quotes[edit]

In "Amnesty" Noah was released from being held captive as an experiment by the aliens for years; she was then captured by the government who tortured her to get information out of her from the aliens: "...They knew what they were doing to me, and yet it never occurred to them not to do it."

Butler, Amnesty, 181.

In "Amnesty" Noah, a female kidnapped by aliens, talks to James Adio, one of the recruiters, as to the reason behind her actions: “No payback. Just what I said earlier. Jobs. We get to live and so do they. I dont need payback.”

Butler, Amnesty, 181.

Third Draft[edit]

The short story Amnesty, focuses on a young girl named Noah. Noah was kidnapped at a young age by an advanced species, considerably aliens. Noah was later on released by these aliens but detained by the United States government. Noah was kept for years with the goal to figure out what had exactly happened to her. In the story, Noah is in the middle of a meeting with possible employees for the alien communities which are alien species that have taken over earth’s desert areas. Noah attempts to convince the group to overcome their fear of the aliens so they can prosper alongside the communities. Noah discusses and compares the experiences she had with both the communities and the humans. Noah admits that she never once faced as much cruelty with the communities as she did with her own government, despite being treated as an experiment and a lab rat by the aliens. Noah’s positive involvement with the alien communities gave her the power to take on the role of translator and collaborator between the two species. Her ability to communicate with both species opens up the possibility of creating a more unified environment between humans and the communities. --Afphia148 (talk) 19:32, 4 April 2016 (UTC) --Leah102 (talk) 19:35, 4 April 2016 (UTC) Jafar.majeedul (talk) 19:41, 4 April 2016 (UTC)

Summaries of "The Book of Martha"[edit]

Third Draft[edit]

The short story Amnesty, focuses on a young girl named Noah. Noah was kidnapped at a young age by an advanced species, considerably aliens. Noah was later on released by these aliens but detained by the United States government. Noah was kept for years with the goal to figure out what had exactly happened to her. In the story, Noah is in the middle of a meeting with possible employees for the alien communities which are alien species that have taken over earth’s desert areas. Noah attempts to convince the group to overcome their fear of the aliens so they can prosper alongside the communities. Noah discusses and compares the experiences she had with both the communities and the humans. Noah admits that she never once faced as much cruelty with the communities as she did with her own government, despite being treated as an experiment and a lab rat by the aliens. Noah’s positive involvement with the alien communities gave her the power to take on the role of translator and collaborator between the two species. Her ability to communicate with both species opens up the possibility of creating a more unified environment between humans and the communities. --Afphia148 (talk) 19:32, 4 April 2016 (UTC) --Leah102 (talk) 19:35, 4 April 2016 (UTC) Jafar.majeedul (talk) 19:52, 4 April 2016 (UTC)

Second Draft[edit]

The short story “The Book of Martha” by Octavia Butler is about a woman by the name of Martha Bes, a middle-aged African American author given a choice by God. When Martha finds herself alone with God, her perception of him is as a tall, long-bearded white man complete with a white robe and huge throne. He asks her to change one thing about the world that will improve the lot of humanity. God presents Martha with the task of making a single decision to change the current state of humanity. Martha is hesitant to accept to the heavy responsibility put upon her by the intimidating God. She questions whether or not she is the right candidate to make such a huge modification to humanity. She, however, cannot afford to oppose God’s request. She understands that there are many other’s who would jump at this opportunity to abuse the power they were gifted. As she comes to terms with the assignment, God begins to transform into a less intimidating deity. She now she’s God face-to-face reducing the tension. She is now speaking to God in a park that she unconsciously created herself. When she begins to lay out possible options God questions her ideas. She then starts to doubt his authoritative guidance. Martha suggests the idea to allow people to dream of their own personal utopia each night. Still uncertain with her choice, Martha perceives God as a black man. She finds herself in a replication of her home, where she offers to make him food. After leaving the kitchen, she finds that God has again transformed, this time into a black woman, who resembles Martha physically. It is when Martha speaks to this form of God, that she realizes that she is confident that her choice is the only way to change mankind with minimal consequences. Essentially transforming Martha into “God”. Martha figures out how to help humanity which results in ultimately sacrificing her passions and progress life for the greater good.Fledgealmanac (talk) 18:26, 4 April 2016 (UTC)StudentSO8 (talk) 18:29, 4 April 2016 (UTC)AprilGreeen (talk) 18:32, 4 April 2016 (UTC)Blazingm0on1111 (talk) 19:17, 4 April 2016 (UTC) Samuels1993 (talk)

Afterword[edit]

In the Afterword of “The Book of Martha”, Butler realizes that everyone has a different idea of perfection, making the task from God seemingly impossible. Each person's utopia would be another person's hell due to the different wants and desires. Butler wrote "The Book of Martha" to express her belief that utopia's can only exist in our individual dreams.

Quotes[edit]

This quote is explaning God basically telling Martha that what he has planned for her is better than she has planned.146.111.144.130 (talk) 18:53, 11 April 2016 (UTC) "If it were truly a cage," God said, "you would still be in it, and I would still look the way I did when you first saw me."

Butler, "The Book of Martha", 210.

“Free will isn’t a guarantee of anything, but it’s a potentially useful tool-- too useful to erase actually”

Butler, "The Book of Martha", 356.

Martha Bes is a middle-aged writer given free will by what she believes is God. God explains to her that with free will she has the ability to solve many of the worlds issues. However, God also explains that her free will and what she does with it, is no guarantee that it will fix any of the world issues. In addition, He also states that free will is something that is of great value regardless of its consequences. RMANEK (talk) 18:31, 11 April 2016 (UTC),angrykakapo

Possible Themes to add to the short story "The Evening and the Morning and the Night" (LAGCC ENG103 student suggestions)[edit]

Segregation, Gift and a Curse, Hope, Struggles of Fitting In, Self Mutilation, Religion, Self Acceptance, Control, Sacrifice for the Greater Good Keyboredplease (talk) 19:43, 28 March 2016 (UTC) AprilGreeen (talk) 19:46, 28 March 2016 (UTC)

Possible Themes to add to the short story "Speech Sounds" (LAGCC ENG103 student suggestions)[edit]

Post here --DrX (talk) 23:26, 20 March 2016 (UTC)

Possible Themes to add to the short story "Amnesty" (LAGCC ENG103 student suggestions)[edit]

Trust, Hope, Faith, Survival, Communication, Collaboration, Alien-Superiority. look into my eye Look into my eye (talk) 18:20, 28 March 2016 (UTC) cempasuchil_86Cempasuchil 86 (talk) 18:21, 28 March 2016 (UTC)PurpleYaya (talk) 18:24, 28 March 2016 (UTC)PurpleYaya

Possible Themes to add to the short story "The Book of Martha" (LAGCC ENG103 student suggestions)[edit]

A theme for " The Book Of Martha " would be equality because martha views " God " as superior at the beginning of the story and later throughout more equal. Another theme would be sacrifice because martha gave up the will to write for the " greater good " since she thinks there will be less conflict if people can escape to there own " Utopias " --Gymlife (talk) 17:46, 28 March 2016 (UTC) Fledgealmanac (talk) 17:47, 28 March 2016 (UTC)Barcode158376 (talk) 17:48, 28 March 2016 (UTC) StudentSO8 (talk) 20:19, 28 March 2016 (UTC)

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