Talk:Carpet

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Former good article nomineeCarpet was a good articles nominee, but did not meet the good article criteria at the time. There are suggestions below for improving the article. Once these issues have been addressed, the article can be renominated. Editors may also seek a reassessment of the decision if they believe there was a mistake.
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February 18, 2008Good article nomineeNot listed
March 11, 2008Good article nomineeNot listed
Current status: Former good article nominee
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History[edit]

File:Antique Carpet Images.jpg
Antique rug is a ancient rugs

Rug weaving is an old art that existed in Persia during 500 B.C. It went through many changes from its inception to its adaptation by other neighboring countries. Archaeologists have been unable to find much evidence in form of carpets and rugs because with time wool, silk and other organic material used in weaving decays. A few worn out pieces have not sufficed in providing enough evidence for useful discoveries.

It is quite possible that people, who were not in contact with each other, started making rugs at the same time at different places. It is equally likely that carpet weavers travelled from place to place, offering their skilful services to create a masterpiece for people who could afford what was considered “frugal” in those times.

On basis of these worn out pieces found in Egypt, it can be safely concluded that the art of flat weaving existed 4000 years ago. In Middle East and other parts of Asia, it existed long before 2000 BC. Ancient nomadic tribes of Central and West Asia were inclined towards the use of woolen carpets against severe cold. Weaving itself, is one of the oldest crafts of the world, that has also been mentioned in Old Testament. Document evidence for weaving in Persia belongs to the period of Sassanid Dynasty which ruled the region, for around four centuries, beginning in the third century.

Rugs were also being woven in China two thousand years ago, however, this did not develop as a proper industry until the mid of eighteenth century.

The earliest antique rug found comes from Safavid dynasty (1501–1736) in the 16th century. The oldest known carpet is called “The Pazryk Carpet” and is approximately 2400 years old. It has a complicated geometrical design with estimated 225 knots per square inch. In Iran, major producers of antique rugs were Herat (1525–1650), Kashan (1525–1650), Kerman (1600–1650) and Tabriz (1500-1550). The industry saw many ups and downs as it was occupied by different dynasties, however, it survived the changes.










MaryPace (talk) 06:33, 22 May 2016 (UTC)

External links modified[edit]

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Axminster[edit]

Could someone provide detailed pictures of what typical Axminster carpets would look like? I went to this article to explain an allusion, and still don't know. 98.14.15.215 (talk) 20:39, 30 July 2017 (UTC)

Also about Rugs[edit]

Right now, this article is also supposed to be about all kinds of rugs. I came specifically looking for nomenclature for rag or braided rugs. There should also be something about ancient and historical woven mats which were used as rugs.73.81.148.161 (talk) 01:28, 28 October 2017 (UTC)

Confusion in the section on etymology and usage[edit]

Here are the first two paragraphs:

It is assumed that the word "carpet" entered into English (English: carpet) in the 13th century (through Medieval Latin carpita, meaning "thick woolen cloth") [11] as a consequence of the trade in rugs through the port cities of the Armenian kingdom of Cilicia. The Online Etymology Dictionary states that the term "carpet" was first used in English in the late 13th century, with the meaning "coarse cloth", and by the mid-14th century, "tablecloth, [or] bedspread".[2] The meaning of the term "carpet" shifted in the 15th century to refer to floor coverings.[2] The term carpet comes from Old French carpite. It is assumed that the word "carpet" entered into French (French: carpette) in the 13th century (through Medieval Latin carpita, meaning "thick woolen cloth") [11] as a consequence of the trade in rugs through the port cities of the Armenian kingdom of Cilicia. One derivation of the term states that the French term came from the Old Italian carpita, from the verb "carpire" meaning to pluck.[3][4] The Online Etymology Dictionary states that the term comes "...from Old French carpite "heavy decorated cloth, carpet," from Medieval Latin or Old Italian carpita "thick woolen cloth," probably from Latin carpere "to card, pluck," probably so called because it was made from unraveled, shred[d]ed, "plucked" fabric".[2]
The Armenian words for carpet are "karpet" (Armenian: կարպետ)[6] or "gorg" (Armenian: գորգ).[7] Though both words in Armenian are synonymous, word "karpet" is mostly used for non-pile rugs and "gorg" is for a pile carpet.

The essential chronological derivation seems to be this: the English got the word from the French; the French got the word either from Medieval Latin or from Old Italian; medieval Latin or Old Italian got the word from Latin carpere; but if the Armenians already had the word carpet in their own language, and if Romans did not make carpets, why would the Romans have developed the word carpet from carpere?

It is only as a preliminary to correction that from the original single statement about the entry of the word into both French and English "as a consequence of the trade in rugs through the port cities of the Armenian kingdom of Cilicia" I made two, one about English and one about French, in which that clause occurs, because it was not clear, in the original, whether both the English and the French had dealings with the Armenians. Yet since it is stated that the French got the word from the Italians, it makes no sense to say that the French got the word from the Armenians; it makes no sense, either, to assert this at all if the Romans did not get the word from their dealings with the Armenians.

Someone using an authoritative history of the ultimate origin of the word and its diffusion along with the diffusion of the thing itself in trade must clean this mess up. Wordwright (talk) 20:26, 2 September 2018 (UTC)

That etymology and usage section is a mess. As well as much of it being confusing and not making sense (as the above editor has pointed out), it currently has duplicated content, unsuitable sources (online user editable dictionaries), important claims that have no sources, and content which is just tagged [11], whatever that means? I've section tagged it for sources. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 92.28.140.48 (talk) 16:42, 17 February 2019 (UTC)
Those [11] and similar marks were introduced as part of a large addition of the content that you (two) feel is problematic. I undid that addition altogether, so now there only actually resolved reference marks. Feel free to continue a discussion of the reliability of the sources and make further improvements. DMacks (talk) 16:57, 17 February 2019 (UTC)

Proposal: Make "Carpet laying" or "Carpet installation" a separate page[edit]

"Carpet installation" is broader, because it covers nonfitted carpet as well. These are a trade that deserves its own page. Can the redirect page to "Carpet" from "Carpetlaying" be removed? Alternatively, at the very least "Carpet installation" should be a linked Wiki Commons category for images of the people and labor. Downtowngal (talk) 16:48, 29 January 2019 (UTC)