Talk:Changes (Tupac Shakur song)

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"We ain't ready, to see a black President"
Took a decade, wish Tupac was here to give some words.

'It's time to fight back that's what Huey said/2 shots in the dark now Huey's dead' In the above lyrics from the song, is Huey a signficant real life character? --Reverieuk 22:59, 24 December 2006 (UTC)


possibly http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huey_Newton ? Many members of tupac's family were members of the black panther party.--Subtle one 05:06, 9 February 2007 (UTC)

EDITED

"Tupac's major influence was a young writer named Kevin Sheridan. Sheridan was influential in creating Tupac's posthumous albums." I took this line out of the article because I could not find anything on a Kevin Sheridan anywhere. There is a composer named Danny Sheridan, but I've found nothing to link him with Tupac.

EDITED

I took out "while he was still alive" because he is not dead.

Black president[edit]

Growing up and hearing this song, this line stuck in my head more than any other, those seven words seemed to sum up the situation for what it was the best, a country part-willing but all together "not ready". I doubt I am alone here, so really think some mention should be made to Obama's victory. The song was only recorded some 10-15 years ago, yet clearly so much has changed since then, and this song in my opinion demonstrates this better than anything else that comes to mind. Hayaku (talk) 14:00, 8 November 2008 (UTC)

As great as it is that Obama is now president, I feel that writing things like "2pac didn't think we were ready for a black president but now we have a black president. Isn't that great?" just seems a little pointless. Unless there are any particularly notable references that talk about the changes to society with reference to this song than I suggest leaving it out. AstroMark (talk) 18:40, 26 January 2009 (UTC)


Removed " (Ironically, a decade after this song was released, Barack Obama would get elected, becoming nation's first black president) ", because it was placed outside of the sentence it was referencing, making little sense. It might also be considered to be of little relevance. Furthermore, it is not really ironic. Tupac said that we were not ready to see a black president (circa 1995), and then 13 years later, it happened. This is not irony. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 69.133.100.209 (talk) 15:43, 6 February 2009 (UTC)

Fair use rationale for Image:Changes (2pac song).jpg[edit]

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Image:Changes (2pac song).jpg is being used on this article. I notice the image page specifies that the image is being used under fair use but there is no explanation or rationale as to why its use in Wikipedia articles constitutes fair use. In addition to the boilerplate fair use template, you must also write out on the image description page a specific explanation or rationale for why using this image in each article is consistent with fair use.

Please go to the image description page and edit it to include a fair use rationale. Using one of the templates at Wikipedia:Fair use rationale guideline is an easy way to insure that your image is in compliance with Wikipedia policy, but remember that you must complete the template. Do not simply insert a blank template on an image page.

If there is other other fair use media, consider checking that you have specified the fair use rationale on the other images used on this page. Note that any fair use images uploaded after 4 May, 2006, and lacking such an explanation will be deleted one week after they have been uploaded, as described on criteria for speedy deletion. If you have any questions please ask them at the Media copyright questions page. Thank you.BetacommandBot 05:13, 2 June 2007 (UTC)

Fair use rationale for Image:Changes (2pac song).jpg[edit]

Nuvola apps important.svg

Image:Changes (2pac song).jpg is being used on this article. I notice the image page specifies that the image is being used under fair use but there is no explanation or rationale as to why its use in this Wikipedia article constitutes fair use. In addition to the boilerplate fair use template, you must also write out on the image description page a specific explanation or rationale for why using this image in each article is consistent with fair use.

Please go to the image description page and edit it to include a fair use rationale. Using one of the templates at Wikipedia:Fair use rationale guideline is an easy way to insure that your image is in compliance with Wikipedia policy, but remember that you must complete the template. Do not simply insert a blank template on an image page.

If there is other fair use media, consider checking that you have specified the fair use rationale on the other images used on this page. Note that any fair use images uploaded after 4 May, 2006, and lacking such an explanation will be deleted one week after they have been uploaded, as described on criteria for speedy deletion. If you have any questions please ask them at the Media copyright questions page. Thank you.

BetacommandBot 04:24, 27 October 2007 (UTC)

One of the best rappers in the U.S.[edit]

Ok...well first sentence is "Changes" is a hip hop song by the late Tupac Shakur who was one of the best rappers in the U.S."

Saying "one of the best rappers in the U.S." doesn't really seem too, encyclopedia like as it's an opinion. (a true one ;D but still)

-GangstaGangsta —Preceding unsigned comment added by 71.62.169.20 (talk) 05:48, 4 May 2010 (UTC)

E-40 or Tupac, priority on the sample?[edit]

Can anyone explain this sentence: "Fellow Bay Area rapper E-40 had used the sample already on his song, "Things'll Never Change," for his album Tha Hall of Game."? I am not sure when E-40 recorded his song, but it is copyright 1996 (or at least the video is). It seems then that Tupac used the sample first, as his song was recorded in 1992. At any rate, should the sentence be changed to reflect this? Additionally, one might wonder about the relevance of this kind of information. Taekwandean (talk) 11:11, 18 October 2010 (UTC)