Talk:Communication disorder

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Childhood-Onset Fluency Disorder[edit]

Hello,

When I was reviewing this page I saw that the definition for Childhood-Onset Fluency Disorder was not very descriptive. It did not explain what exactly the disorder is except for stuttering and simply said it causes problems. The definition that is found under the heading Changes in the DSM-5 should be something like this:

Childhood-Onset Fluency Disorder (Stuttering) - standard fluency and rhythm of speech is interrupted, often causing the repetition of whole words and syllables[1]. This disorder causes many communication problems for the individual.

Emilyanncoyle (talk) 23:00, 2 December 2014 (UTC)

Adding a treatment section[edit]

Hello,

I noticed that the Communication disorder page lacked a treatment section. I think that there are a couple different additions that could be made as well as some links to other Wikipedia pages. While there are many different forms of communication disorders, I did find some information pertaining to treatment for children with primary speech and language delays or disorders. An edit to this aspect of treatment could be:

There is no official and universally accepted guideline on how to treat children with primary speech and language disorders, but a Cochrane review found that there was some support of speech and language therapy for children who experienced deficits with both phonological and expressive vocabulary.[2] Speech-language therapy is a method of treatment that involves specific tasks to aid in improving a patient's language and or communication abilities.[3] Patients suffering from aphasia following a stroke have also seen benefits from speech-language therapies.[4]

Hopefully this may help. Ehealy92 (talk) 01:53, 14 October 2015 (UTC)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nolen-Hoeksema, Susan (2014). Abnormal Psychology (Sixth ed.). 2 Penn Plaza, New York, NY 10121: McGraw-Hill Education. p. 301. ISBN 978-0-07-803538-8. 
  2. ^ Law, J; Garret, Z; Nye, C. "Speech and language therapy interventions for children with primary speech and language delay or disorder". Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2003 (3). doi:10.1002/14651858.CD004110. 
  3. ^ Brady, MC; Kelly, H; Godwin, J; Enderby, P. "Speech and language therapy for aphasia following stroke". Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012 (5). doi:10.1002/14651858.CD000425.pub3. 
  4. ^ Brady, MC; Kelly, H; Godwin, J; Enderby, P. "Speech and language therapy for aphasia following stroke". Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012 (5). doi:10.1002/14651858.CD000425.pub3. 

Changing Stuttering to Childhood Onset Fluency Disorder[edit]

Hello,

It appears that in the breakdown of the different types of communication disorders, childhood onset fluency disorder is still referred to as stuttering. I think it is important that this be changed because with the recent release of DSM-5 the disorder is no longer called stuttering but rather childhood onset fluency disorder. It could, instead, say something like this

-Childhood Onset Fluency Disorder (commonly known as stuttering) is characterized by disturbances in the fluency and or rhythm of speech. Some examples of dysfluency that may occur include sound and syllable repetition, excess physical tension when producing certain words, and pausing within words. It is often accompanied by anxiety about speaking that these disturbances cause[1].

(Ehealy92 (talk) 23:36, 4 December 2015 (UTC))

References[edit]

  1. ^ Association], [American Psychiatry (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders : DSM-5 (5th ed. ed.). Washington [etc.]: American Psychiatric Publishing. ISBN 0890425558.