Talk:Convective available potential energy

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WikiProject class rating[edit]

This article was automatically assessed because at least one WikiProject had rated the article as stub, and the rating on other projects was brought up to Stub class. BetacommandBot 09:46, 10 November 2007 (UTC)

Modified image of Skew-T diagram[edit]

The first skew-T image did not explain what the three colored lines represent. I found an explanation on this french page: [1] and added it to the caption.

The explanation makes sense, but invalidates the caption's first sentence "... cooling which occurred in the mid-levels resulting in an unstable atmosphere ...".

I am no meteorologist, but it looks like the mid-levels became warmer and much dryer, hence the instability. Moist air is less dense than dry air (water vapor is 0.6 times less dense than dry air), and also contains more latent heat (when water condenses to a liquid, it releases heat, just as heat is needed to vaporize water). This is what gives C.A.P.E to the moist rising air parcel.

But before I make that edit, it would be great to hear from a Real Meteorologist (tm). I will contact some.

KeithLofstrom (talk) 15:37, 22 April 2011 (UTC)

More accessible explanation please[edit]

This article is written as if talking to the .1% of people who already know the material don't need to read it. Some work on more down-to-earth explanations would be good. A good starting point would be to briefly explain red link terms where the reader is sent to a non-existent article to see what they mean in order to read this article.North8000 (talk) 22:50, 4 July 2012 (UTC)

Actually, it is written to the several percent of persons (like me) who don't already understand it, but can do so. It is clear that the average lay person will need to absorb quite a bit of theory (mostly relating to heat & mass transfer) before being able to understand this article. Anyway, the links to Atmospheric thermodynamics and Lifted index at the end should provide a sufficient starting point for the lay person. — Preceding unsigned comment added by AliasMarlowe (talkcontribs) 13:41, 26 December 2014 (UTC)