Talk:DECstation

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Photo[edit]

We might want to replace the picture as it is very grainy. 66.191.19.217 15:16, 9 September 2007 (UTC)

Trade-in from Rainbows[edit]

Not sure if this is worthy of including in the article, but, just in case someone's interested, here's a USEnet article describing a trade-in program DEC offered in 1989 for Rainbow owners to "move to industry-standard personal computers":

http://groups.google.com/group/comp.sys.dec.micro/msg/1cc8569632ef20c7

--NapoliRoma (talk) 14:39, 26 June 2008 (UTC)

Considering that DECstations are ARC-compatible, I would assume that they were more "industry-standard" than the x86-based, but non-IBM-compatible Rainbow. I do intend to cover this at a eventually. Rilak (talk) 09:13, 28 July 2008 (UTC)
OK, dumb mistake, the link was referring to x86-based DECstations. Please disregard previous comment. This is what happens when you've spent a while researching and editing without taking any breaks. Rilak (talk) 09:18, 28 July 2008 (UTC)

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Blacklisted Links Found on DECstation[edit]

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Commentary on "DECstation RISC workstations: History"[edit]

The second paragraph of this section ends with the statement "At the time DEC was mostly known for their CISC systems including the successful PDP and VAX lines.", where "VAX" is a link to the appropriate article. What I would like to point out is that there is no such thing as "the PDP line" when speaking of computers from Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC), and that some of the systems named PDP-n (n = defined as a small integer ≤ 16) meet many of the RISC definitions. Prior to the VAX family, DEC produced computer systems architectures based on word sizes of 18 (PDP-1, PDP-4/7/9/15 family), 12 (PDP-5, PDP-8 family), 36 (PDP-6/10 family), and 16 (PDP-11 family) bits. The 12-bit systems had no memory-to-memory instructions in a repertoire of 8 opcodes, only accumulator (register) load-store, though subroutine calls modified memory by storing the return address in the first word of the called routine. The 36-bit instruction set did allow operations directly on memory, but did not require their use; the most common subroutine call mechanisms were stack based. I realize that this may seem esoteric, but many people not familiar with the different product lines, including professionals in the computer industry, have been misled by the DEC naming convention prior to 1971 (when later PDP-10 systems were called the DECsystem-10 and DECSYSTEM-20) into believing that every PDP-n system was architecturally related to every other PDP-n system. Does anyone have a suggestion for a short edit (I'm terribly longwinded on this topic) to disambiguate this page?

Rmaldersoniii (talk) 19:38, 10 October 2016 (UTC)