Talk:Electrical grid

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Untitled[edit]

Discussion regarding the creation of this page may be found at Talk:Grid connection, where much of the material of this article came from. -J JMesserly (talk) 18:29, 22 November 2008 (UTC)

Images[edit]

I used the image with the caption: "General layout of electricity networks. Voltages and depictions of electrical lines are typical for Germany and other European systems." for some academic work in Germany and my professor noted the caption 'Low Voltage (50kV)' this is too high generally for low voltage. He has advised me that Low voltage is less that 1kV, and Medium Voltage is between 1 and 60kV. Thus on my version of the diagram I have changed the image to read Low / Medium Voltage (<60kV). I was not able to attach the image without an account. Sorry. Nathan K. www.madteckhead.com

I updated the image to a .SVG file and cleaned it up a bit using the same values as Nathan K. had. --MBizon (talk) 20:14, 8 March 2010 (UTC)
  • Even knowing that it's German, seeing 250KV labelled "extra high voltage" while more common (in my area) 750KV is barely "high voltage" is quite odd. Perhaps these voltage figures must be removed altogether? East of Borschov (talk) 12:00, 12 June 2010 (UTC)

On the front lines of the power grid 26.Oct.2011 NYT[edit]

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/26/business/energy-environment/behind-the-power-grid-humans-with-high-stakes-jobs.html by Matthew L. Wald 97.87.29.188 (talk) 23:12, 26 October 2011 (UTC)

Maybe more accurately in Electricity in the United States? 99.190.85.15 (talk) 03:31, 27 October 2011 (UTC)

naming[edit]

electric power grid? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 76.120.168.91 (talk) 20:23, 19 December 2013 (UTC)

definition[edit]

I would hesitate to include the power producers as part of the electric grid, just as a matter of semantics. Delivery and production are two separate things even if one depends on the other. The term ‘network’ also relates to interconnectedness and not production. My argument is that the grid is a delivery system of (in this case) wires connecting producers and consumers, and does not include the producers and consumers; it is the name of the thing that runs between them. I do not believe this is made clear in the article.

Cla3mute (talk) 12:20, 23 April 2014 (UTC)

  • Compare with a living body in which the various users of blood, including the organs, are getting a supply of it as needed. 70.27.152.243 (talk) 18:24, 20 July 2016 (UTC)

Auctions[edit]

The article needs a section on how auctions determine which power plants produce how much electricity to meet demand. Demand (and therefore supply) varies day to day and minute to minute. These are some sources, especially the World Bank study on long term auctions, but not much on intra-day auctions to vary power throughout the day:

Numbersinstitute (talk) 08:04, 17 November 2015 (UTC)

No section on operation of a grid[edit]

eg grid frequency regulation. - Not even in a See also section. Where to look ? - Rod57 (talk) 20:04, 8 December 2015 (UTC)

Definition and extent of a grid[edit]

Is it not an AC network that all operates at the same frequency and all in phase ?
or is the essential characteristic the graph-like structure (rather than tree) with redundant connections ?
Article says UK had a synchronised AC national grid in 1938. National Grid (Great Britain) says regional grids in 1933.
Smart grid#Historical development of the electricity grid says 1886 (first? use of transformers in AC transmission in Great Barrington)
- or is it a network that can accept power from non-adjacent generators ~ 1915 ?
Did the term originate in UK or USA ? (the Electricity (Supply) Act 1926, calls for a "national gridiron" ) - Rod57 (talk) 01:32, 9 December 2015 (UTC)

Confusing wording in topology section[edit]

"Most transmission grids offer the reliability that more complex mesh networks provide. The expense of mesh topologies restrict their application to transmission and medium voltage distribution grids. Redundancy allows line failures to occur and power is simply rerouted while workmen repair the damaged and deactivated line."

What does this mean? Most transmission grids are mesh topologies? Or most transmission grids are not mesh topologies, but manage to achieve the same reliability anyway? If the latter, we should say what alternate means are used to achieve this reliability. If the former, we should just come out and state that most transmission grids use a mesh topology.

A second point is that "mesh" is never defined. Rpgoldman (talk) 00:27, 18 January 2016 (UTC)

Future trends[edit]

The phrase: "aeroderivative gas turbines used in jet aircraft;". I think this should be "aeroderivative gas turbines based on designs used in jet aircraft;" but I don't know for sure. Rpgoldman (talk) 05:17, 18 January 2016 (UTC)

What is this article about vs. electric power distribution and wide area synchronous grid?[edit]

The article contains banners (dated to 2009!) saying that the content should be "harmonized with text in Electric power distribution". That would be good but raises the question "what is the difference between "the grid" and electric power distribution and an interconnection (aka wide area synchronous grid). I propose that content in this article that's not in electric power distribution be moved there, and the rest (which wouldn't be much) be merged with wide area synchronous grid. --Cornellier (talk) 21:11, 25 March 2016 (UTC)