Talk:Family tree of the Greek gods

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
          This article is of interest to the following WikiProjects:
WikiProject Greece (Rated List-class)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Greece, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Greece on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
 List  This article has been rated as List-Class on the project's quality scale.
 
WikiProject Classical Greece and Rome (Rated List-class, High-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is part of the WikiProject for Classical Greece and Rome, a group of contributors who write Wikipedia's Classics articles. If you would like to join the WikiProject or learn how to contribute, please see our project page. If you need assistance from a classicist, please see our talk page.
 List  This article has been rated as List-Class on the project's quality scale.
 High  This article has been rated as High-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Mythology (Rated List-class)
WikiProject icon This article is supported by WikiProject Mythology. This project provides a central approach to Mythology-related subjects on Wikipedia. Please participate by editing the article, and help us assess and improve articles to good and 1.0 standards, or visit the WikiProject page for more details.
 List  This article has been rated as List-Class on the project's quality scale.
 

Chronos[edit]

Why no Chronos? Not to be mistaken for Cronus. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 86.22.152.207 (talk) 12:46, 9 March 2011 (UTC)

For some reason, this family tree seems to omit most of the primordial figures from the Orphic hymns. Chronos, Ananke and Phanes are nowhere to be seen. Maybe they've been glossed over because they aren't considered part of mainstream Greek mythology? Flax5 (talk) 16:11, 14 March 2012 (UTC)

I agree The original Chronos is not their neither is Aether, Chronos' daughter and wife to Chaos. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 207.117.33.135 (talk) 16:59, 27 September 2012 (UTC)

Chaos had no other significant partner. Also, Aether is a male, not female. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Hidden Secret (talkcontribs) 15:10, 10 October 2012 (UTC)

Heracles[edit]

Heracles should be there. He is the husband of Hebe and they have two sons- Alexiares and Anicetus.

Pontus[edit]

Pontus is the child of Gaea and Aether, not just Gaea. He and Gaea then had quite a few children. I'm going to try and add the children of Typhon and Echidna myself, but Pontus' line is to confusing for me. Well, some say Gaea, via parthenogenesis, gave birth to Uranus, Pontus, and the Ourea. If some others say that Pontus was a son of Gaea and Aether, I guess you could add note about the conflicting origins of Pontus.


One of those children is the sea god Thaumas [1], himself the father of the goddess Iris [2]. Alzrius (talk) —Preceding undated comment added 00:49, 15 May 2010 (UTC).

Aphrodite[edit]

I remember that I have read that Aphrodite was from foam surreunded Uranos' cutoff genital in the ocean. Solution?Hannu 07:56, 3 June 2007 (UTC) Yes, Aphrodite was born from foam. At least Hesiod says that. ----

image maps[edit]

We need a facility for making image maps... Martin 17:46 26 Jul 2003 (UTC)

This will be ugly complicated no matter how we display it. And look at the amount of incest. Rmhermen 13:51, Nov 23, 2003 (UTC)

book[edit]

There is a book dedicated to this topic (about two years ago). Sorry, I cannot remember its title. -- Toytoy 03:34, Nov 5, 2004 (UTC)

Eris[edit]

Where is Eris? --Anaraug 05:29, 23 September 2005 (UTC)

Eris is now listed under Nyx's children. Tuxedohamm 00:53, 25 September 2005 (UTC)

She should be Zeus and Hera's kids. - Random dude —Preceding unsigned comment added by 96.224.131.66 (talk) 02:23, 19 May 2010 (UTC)

No. Hera and Zeus' children are Ares, Hebe, Eileithyia and Enyo (I didn't mention Hephaestus because he was the son of Hera alone. Hephaestus' father later became Zeus after Hera married him.), Eris was not a daughter of Zeus and Hera. Enyo is often mistaken as Eris. Or in most accounts Hera and Zeus' children are Ares, Eileithyia and Hebe. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 72.73.115.6 (talk) 22:22, 7 June 2010 (UTC)

great job[edit]

I am just a ramdom reader of the Wikipedia. In my opinion, you guys really have done a great job but this family tree is quite difficult to read. A family tree is useful for beginners to understand the complicated relationships between all gods. However this one is quite confusing that all the lines are in the same colours. Maybe a graphic version will be better. Anyway, very well done. - PBN

Another tree[edit]

There is a family tree @ http://ludios.org/science/greekgods/image and since every god you click on leads to wikipedia, I don't see why someone can't just see if that can be put here instead because i cant understand this one at all.

joke[edit]

I looked at the family tree and.. micheal jackson aint no greek god. Very funny.. 0.0;

Electryon[edit]

electryon was the son of Perseus and Andromeda(daughter of Cassiopeia), oh and another thing Zeus and Heres are meant to be sisters on that list so then why did they get married. Charles O —Preceding unsigned comment added by Christhapy (talkcontribs) 19:35, 16 July 2008 (UTC)

LMFAO -Smoke Weed

Changes needed[edit]

I do not know enough about Greek mythology but, although the current tree is impressive, it's just not readable. I'm not sure if the current tree should simply be replaced, or if it should be left intact with a better one linked to (the mentioned http://ludios.org/science/greekgods/image is impressive).

Also, what might be best is having a less extended one on the Wikipedia page (With an obvious mention that it's simplified), and links to complete trees. Because a text only tree is very hard to understand, and make it complete (and complex), not fitting the window and it's just too confusing to use. So maybe a simplified one on Wikipedia, and a link to the more complete one found at Ludios.org.

For now I will simply place a link to the one at Ludios.org. I can't find a less extended tree because I lack the knowledge to verify it, I wouldn't be comfortable replacing the current tree and so. Hopefully someone qualified will clean this page. --A Sunshade Lust 21:25, 31 December 2005 (UTC)

If anyone do changes on this page, he could be interested in this czech version: cs:Soubor:Genealogie řeckých bohů.png - available source is SVG and it is derived from this page. It is not that genealogical like that version at ludios, but it could by modified. But I think that Greak gods relations are so hypothetical, that instead of using genealogy, it is more lucid to use some map. Genealogy and relations is changing from author to author and I think version on this page is Hesiodos version (but I em not sure). --Adam 62.177.70.211 22:54, 14 February 2006 (UTC)
I find it interesting that Tyche, Rhodos, Peitho, Eunomia, and Hermaphroditus are kids of Apollo and Hermes... two male gods. While they were quite close (with Hermes being Apollo's "most beloved", according to Homer), I doubt they had children. These should be linked under Hermes and Aphrodite. 24.3.194.152 06:57, 21 January 2007 (UTC)
It's fixed now. W. Flake (talk) 19:30, 21 January 2007 (UTC)

Make the family tree clearer[edit]

It's quite obvious that this family tree is difficult to understand. The page needs great change and improvement. I suggest that we can follow the one here. It is much readable and links can be added to the names. I think that we should base on that format and make a similar one here.

{{familytree}}[edit]

I will be working to change this page to use the familytree template. This change is being made boldly and with the note on Category:Articles with ASCII art taken into account. Comments welcome here or on my talk page. Thanks! - Corbin Be excellent 21:06, 29 May 2006 (UTC)

I can only wish you good luck. Back when I first wrote {{familytree}} I considered doing it myself but found the task too daunting. I'm glad someone has risen up to the challenge. I hope it'll turn out well, and I'll be glad to assist in any technical matters regarding the template. (One thing to keep in mind is the current 99-column limit for them template: I think this page will be pushing it. If necessary, it can be increased, though.) —Ilmari Karonen (talk) 18:12, 1 June 2006 (UTC)
Indeed. Current status can be found at User:CorbinSimpson/Workspace. It's tough work, but somebody's got to do it! - Corbin Be excellent 20:03, 1 June 2006 (UTC)
Good luck! That looks like hard work! I just came here to suggest that change... — Reinyday, 21:20, 9 July 2006 (UTC)
Before starting you might want to save yourself some work by taking a look at the Chinese wiki here which already uses the familytree template. --Ruhan 02:47, 12 September 2006 (UTC)

I put up my version of the {{familytree}} based chart. Please note, the data was taken from the page now listed as a reference. Because of this, data was lost in the migration. If you want me to try and reconstruct the original table, let me know, but this version will at the very least fill the gap. W. Flake ( talk | contribs ) 06:22, 31 December 2006 (UTC)

SVG format?[edit]

Has anyone considered converting this into SVG format? ASCII art is SO Web 1.0.

Why?[edit]

Why is Perseus in there? hes a hero not a God or a Goddess....and he comes from nowhere hes just hanging there on the top left. METALFREAK04 19:57, 5 October 2007 (UTC)

Perseus, Alexander, Patrocalus and a few of the other heroes became Gods upon their deaths —Preceding unsigned comment added by Rikudemyx (talkcontribs) 06:04, 14 January 2008 (UTC)

Other Mythologies?[edit]

This is a great tree, it was vary helpful in many respects (and wasn't too hard to decipher) but I was wondering if there was a project/campaign to do the same for other mythologies. Hindu and Egyptian mythology don't have one last i checked. Just another guy trying to be a Chemical Engineer, Nanobiotechnologist, and Mathematician (talk) 16:40, 18 December 2007 (UTC)

Greek Myths[edit]

i read in a book called 'the Greek myths: 1' by Robert Graves that Aphrodite was born when Cronus went against his father Uranus and cut off his genitals and threw them in the sea, then Aphrodite rose from the foam. the book also mentions that others think that she she was born from Zeus and Dione. it says that in the Pelasgian creation myth that the goddess Eurynome rose naked from chaos and she created the snake Ophion who together made and egg that when hatched everything that existed fell out, Eurynome made the 7 planetary powers and for each set a titan, one male one female;Theia, Hyperion for the sun:phoebe,atlas for the moon:Dione and curis for mars:metis and coeus for mercury: themis and eurymedon for Jupiter:tethys and oceanus for Venus: rhea and ronus for Saturn. thats how they came to be. it is also believed that Zeus entwined with his mother rhea. the Greek mythes are very old and so may have different versions, or be told slightly differently. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 78.149.149.150 (talk) 14:49, 22 December 2007 (UTC)

Greek Myths[edit]

i read in a book called 'the Greek myths: 1' by Robert Graves that Aphrodite was born when Cronus went against his father Uranus and cut off his genitals and threw them in the sea, then Aphrodite rose from the foam. the book also mentions that others think that she she was born from Zeus and Dione. it says that in the Pelasgian creation myth that the goddess Eurynome rose naked from chaos and she created the snake Ophion who together made and egg that when hatched everything that existed fell out, Eurynome made the 7 planetary powers and for each set a titan, one male one female;Theia, Hyperion for the sun:phoebe,atlas for the moon:Dione and curis for mars:metis and coeus for mercury: themis and eurymedon for Jupiter:tethys and oceanus for Venus: rhea and ronus for Saturn. thats how they came to be. it is also believed that Zeus entwined with his mother rhea. the Greek mythes are very old and so may have different versions, or be told slightly differently, this is what confuses me. but it would be very hard to preserve a story from so long ago without a few or more parts of it changing. this is why i find history very interesting. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 78.149.149.150 (talk) 14:53, 22 December 2007 (UTC)

Kronos/Cronus[edit]

Cronus is spelt Kronos. Kronos is greek, people only say 'Cronus' becuase of the American Version of the book 'Nyad' by that dude. yeah. get it right. METALFREAK04 (talk) 14:42, 12 February 2008 (UTC)

Clean up[edit]

Cleaned up the tree. Everything that was included at http://ludios.org/greekgods/ is included, as well as quite a few extra figures I thought should be included, and managed to squeeze in. --Yenemus (talk) 14:57, 25 September 2008 (UTC)

Lock this article[edit]

I'm sure a few people have noticed that some moron has deleted everything off this page and replaced it with some dumb comment saying "ha ha, i'm mr. wilson." and more following. Someone please restore the content and try and lock this article for now. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 173.32.85.82 (talk) 02:00, 22 October 2008 (UTC)

Apparently, the vandalism has been going on for quite a while. You might be right. --Koveras  07:14, 16 February 2010 (UTC)

Well, we can't just lock the article. I will be watching out for people deleting and replacing gods with "haha, i'm mr. wilson." Yes, the vandalism has been going on for a while. ----

How to interpret this tree[edit]

This is a very interesting tree wit ha lot of useful information. It would help if there was a key describing the use of color, bold text, etc. For example, what is the significance of the "green" gods in the middle of the page? Thanks. Truthanado (talk) 17:26, 16 November 2008 (UTC)

I did actually create a legend for it when I made the tree, but someone removed it without explanation. I re-added it, but I can't be sure how long it will stay. :( --83.226.64.212 (talk) 18:51, 18 November 2008 (UTC)

Uranos[edit]

Shouldn't he be in the family tree —Preceding unsigned comment added by Zordon123456789mlw7 (talkcontribs) 01:01, 12 May 2009 (UTC) He is in the family tree. ---- Uranos was the father of the Titans,Andrew. And the Titan,Cronus, was father of the six original greek gods.--69.113.146.244 (talk) 22:09, 26 February 2010 (UTC)

Atlas' brother[edit]

According to the wikipedia article on Atlas, he has a brother. Should this appear in the diagram? 220.244.143.54 (talk) 13:29, 18 July 2009 (UTC)

Alternate origins[edit]

Hephestos and Athena need notes stating that there are alternative origins for them, just like for Aphrodite and Eros. Hephestos is sometimes (often in fact) listed as being parthenogenically created by Hera and Athena's mother is often given as Metis. Well, I guess that's right.----

Also, shouldn't PJ not be the god of mountains? And I think Metis is missing from the list of Titans. And shouldn't there be a link or something stating that Hades and Persephone are married... and what about Chiron, centaur son of Kronos? And the monstrous children of Echidna & Typhon or Echidna & Heracles? 72.185.169.135 (talk) 11:49, 30 January 2010 (UTC) Metis is missing.----

Chaos[edit]

Chaos, or the Void, was NOT the one from whom all else sprang. Hesiod's Theogony tells us: "Verily at the first Khaos came to be, but next wide-bosomed Gaia (Earth), the ever-sure foundations of all the deathless ones who hold the peaks of snowy Olympus ... From Khaos came forth Erebos and black Nyx (Night)." - Hesiod, Theogony 116 Chaos.

If we aim to be professional, let's stop propagating this misunderstanding. Chaos was just one of the Primordial deities, and it never had anything to do with Gaia or her children (interestingly enough, no child of Gaia ever married a child of Chaos). The two are separate. I can't edit the tree, but I hope somebody will. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 82.143.189.120 (talk) 13:21, 10 February 2010 (UTC)

According to Maicar, "some authors, when reading Hesiod's Theogony, have understood that Gaia, Eros and Tartarus came after Chaos in the sense that they are the offspring of Chaos, while others think they just appeared after Chaos". Here we have a respectable source saying that both interpretations are valid, so I've added this information to the Gaia article.
By the way, even if we interpret the text such that Gaia is unrelated to Chaos, their descendants have still intermarried: Thalassa, the great-granddaughter of Chaos, married Pontus, the son of Gaia, and bore him several children. Flax5 (talk) 17:51, 19 March 2012 (UTC)

Morpheus[edit]

shouldnt morpheus be added, he is a son of hypno and god of dreams —Preceding unsigned comment added by Mace98 (talkcontribs) 02:00, 2 March 2010 (UTC) He should, actually. What does everybody think? ----

He has two brothers Phobetor and Icelos as well. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 1.127.255.247 (talk) 05:57, 31 May 2013 (UTC)

Actually, he's only Hypnos' son in some versions. In most he is depicted as Hypnos' brother. Morpheus is included (as are his many brothers) in the square reading The Oneiroi (Dream deities) as the son of Nyx (night). — Preceding unsigned comment added by 108.201.163.170 (talk) 16:58, 18 October 2013 (UTC)

The Roman Way[edit]

Khaos
The Void
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tartarus
The Abyss
 
Terra
the Earth
 
 
Eros
Desire[1]
 
Erebose
Darkness
 
Night
the Night
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Moros
Doom
 
Oneiroi
Dreams
 
Nemesis
Vengance
 
Momus
Blame
 
Philotes
Affection
 
Geras
Aging
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Thypoeus
the storms
 
Uranus
the Sky
 
 
Ourea
the Mountains
 
Sea
the Sea
 
Aethra
Heaven
 
Day
The Day
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Thanatos
Death
 
Hypnos
Sleep
 
Discordia
Strife
 
Apate
Deceit
 
Oizys
Distress
 
Moirae &
Ceres
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Furies
 
Gigantes
 
Meliae
 
Venus[2]
 
Hecatonchires
 
Titans
 
Cyclopes
 
Echnida
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Other Titan
 
Other Titan
 
Other Titan
 
Other Titan
 
Other Titan
 
Other Titan
 
Saturn
 
Ops
 
Other Titan
 
Lethe
 
Other Titan
 
Milo
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Oceanids
 
 
 
Clymene
 
Helios
 
 
Aurora
 
 
 
Asteria
 
 
Ceres
 
 
Vesta
 
 
Juno
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Prometheus
 
 
Epimetheus
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Inakkus
 
Melia
 
 
 
Heliades
 
Luna
 
 
Latona
 
Pluto
 
 
Neptune
 
 
Jupiter
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Muses
 
Atlas
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Io
 
Pleione
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Apollo
 
Diana
 
 
 
Proserpina
 
Minerva
 
 
Juventas
 
 
Vulcan
 
 
Mars
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Hyades
 
Hesperides
 
Pleiades
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Epaphus
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Eris
 
Lithya
 
 
Dione
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Merope
 
 
 
 
 
 
May
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Alcmene
 
 
 
Semele
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Mercury
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Venus[2]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Hercules
 
 
Bacchus
 
 
Faunus
 
Tyche
 
Rhode
 
Peitho
 
Eunomia
 
Hermaphroditos
 
 
Cupid[1]
 
 
Concordia
 
 
Deimos
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Anesta
 
Himeros
 
Phobos
 
 
 

Wait, why are some Titans listed as "Other Titan"?

  1. ^ a b Conflicting origins. Eros is usually mentioned as the son of Aphrodite and Ares, but Hesiod's Theogony places him as one of the primordial beings, born from the Void (Chaos).
  2. ^ a b There are two major conflicting stories for Aphrodite's origins: Hesiod (Theogony) claims that she was "born" from the foam of the sea after Cronos castrated Uranus, thus making her Uranus' daughter; but Homer (Iliad, book V) has Aphrodite as daughter of Zeus and Dione. According to Plato (Symposium 180e), the two were entirely separate entities: Aphrodite Ourania and Aphrodite Pandemos.

Disney Characters are not Greek gods[edit]

Hello, I just joined ten minutes ago because I saw someone tampered with the article in question. Replacing some of the Greek gods with Disney characters such as Mickey in the place of Zeus and Donald Duck in place of Aphrodite. I did what I could to return the family tree to its original state, but I'm not very experienced with any of this. If anyone else would care to look at this and make sure everything is okay, it would be much appreciated. - Nixaeùs (April 13, 2010)

Hi. Yes, the article has been repeatedly vandalized for as long as I can remember. We have some very persistent trolls here... As for returning it to the original state, it's actually pretty easy: you just go to history tab (on top of the article), select the current version and the last good version of the article, click "Compare", then "Undo", then "Save". The wiki engine will do the rest for you. Thanks for keeping an eye out, looking forward to working with you. :) --Koveras  08:42, 14 April 2010 (UTC)

error I think[edit]

The tree shows that Hermes and Dryope produced Pan. I'm pretty sure that was Hermes and Maia, who is nearby on the tree. I don't know how to edit this thing, could somebody change it please? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 72.93.241.60 (talk) 20:56, 16 April 2010 (UTC)

The Pan (god) article notes the conflicting origin myths but is does mention Dryope as possible mother, while not mentioning Maia at all. --Koveras  18:25, 17 April 2010 (UTC)

I disagree entirely. In most version, Aphrodite is in fact the mother of Pan... — Preceding unsigned comment added by JayceeLove3 (talkcontribs) 01:29, 16 April 2012 (UTC)

Latinate spellings[edit]

Is this article called "Family tree of the Greek gods" or "Family tree of the Greco-Roman gods"? ::) What does commonplace status of Romanized names have to do with Greek gods per se? --Koveras  18:53, 21 April 2010 (UTC)

The latinate spellings of the Greek gods are the most common spellings of their names in English. For example the most common spelling in English of the the Titan is Cronus not Kronos. Paul August 21:03, 21 April 2010 (UTC)
I agree with that, but in my opinion, the spellings closer to the original Greek pronunciation are more appropriate in this particular article. --Koveras  07:54, 22 April 2010 (UTC)
The way the names are pronounced in Greek is irrelevant. We should use whatever the standard English spelling is — the same spelling we use for the main article (e.g Cronus) and elsewhere in the encyclopedia. We should strive for consistency. Using multiple spellings simply confuses things. Paul August 14:26, 22 April 2010 (UTC)
Oh, well, if you say so... I didn't really care for this article, anyway. :D --Koveras  20:14, 22 April 2010 (UTC)

Edit request from 75.28.111.101, 7 June 2010[edit]

{{editsemiprotected}} Two sections were merged to make this one, for ease of discussion.

I notice that you have Persephone's name in bold. However, she is not one of the Twelve Olympians, so I feel that this should be unbolded.

Unless, of course, you are doing it for important gods, regardless of rank, but if that's the case, then you should bold Hades and Hestia too. 75.28.111.101 (talk) 23:57, 6 June 2010 (UTC)

The Twelve Olympians page notes that Persephone, Hades and Hestia are all sometimes included among the twelve, though none are always included (like Zeus, for instance). Since the definition of who the Twelve comprises is fluid, I think using that as a benchmark is not useful. The decision, then, becomes what the editors of this page think are the "important" gods. My opinion is that all three should be bolded, as they are all clearly in the most-important tier. ÷seresin 02:07, 7 June 2010 (UTC)
Hades, probably. Hestia, I don't think so. But I'm no expert, so I"m going to untransclude this semi-protected template to save reviewers' time. The eyes we need on this are the eyes who've watchlisted the article already. Regards, {{Sonia|ping|enlist}} 08:51, 7 June 2010 (UTC)

Merope/Dryope[edit]

Pan's mother, Dryope, is not named Dryope. It's Merope. Dryope is one of the seven Heliades. Merope was the youngest Pleiad and sister of Hermes mother Maia. Hermes then met Merope and Merope said she would only marry a shepherd and Hermes in the form of a shepherd and then raped her. Later they produced Pan. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 72.73.115.6 (talk) 22:29, 7 June 2010 (UTC)

What's your source for this? According to our article there are many versions for the parents of Pan, note 6 says "W.H. Roscher, AusführlichesLexikon der Gr. u. Röm. Mythologie (1909:1379f) finds eighteen variants for Pan's genealogy". Paul August 14:38, 8 July 2010 (UTC)

Some "people" seem to be missing[edit]

When you go down to the list of titan you can see where their children are indicated, however if you go to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titan_(mythology) if list there being more "people" for the second generation that are not included currently in the tree.

One being Iapetus' son Menoetius and the other being ALL of Crius's sons. (Astraeus, Pallas, and Perses)

I noticed this also in a few other places, and I was wondering if it had anything to do with the different accounts that different philosophers had. One philosopher says this god was the product of these other two, where as another philosopher says differently. 70.136.38.115 (talk) 20:46, 13 September 2010 (UTC)

Alternatives and Incompleteness[edit]

I think it is clear that such a tree must be incomplete and cannot take account of the various contradictory alternative relationships found scattered throughout Greek literature (just a few examples have already been discussed above) - perhaps this should be mentioned? Otherwise, the tree does give a fairly simplistic view. Harsimaja (talk) 20:37, 7 April 2011 (UTC)

Agree. Paul August 21:46, 7 April 2011 (UTC)

Hephaestus[edit]

I would like to point out that some mythology has Hephaestus as Hera's child only. Not Zeus' too. 174.124.101.64 (talk) 04:13, 13 September 2011 (UTC)ObsoleteKnight 9/12/2011

Yes, as is pointed out at Hephaestus#Parentage. Paul August 12:58, 13 September 2011 (UTC)
I've now added an explanatory note. Paul August 13:22, 13 September 2011 (UTC)

Colours[edit]

I think that the Olympians should be given their own colour in the family tree, just like the Titans. It's inconsistent to colour one and not the other. At the moment, the Olympians' names are bolded, but this doesn't make them stand out as clearly as they should, considering their importance in Greek myth. I think a light pink would create a nice contrast with the green Titans and blue hyperlinks, but the page is too complex for me to edit myself. Maybe the Protogenoi could also be distinguished by a colour of their own. Flax5 (talk) 18:55, 12 March 2012 (UTC)

Ares and Aphrodite's Children[edit]

Missing one! Adrestia is goddess of revenge and balance, and is portrayed with Nemesis... to see more on Adrestia go to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adrestia — Preceding unsigned comment added by JayceeLove3 (talkcontribs) 01:26, 16 April 2012 (UTC)

Edit request on 27 July 2012[edit]

Please change where it says "The Names marked in green are the titans" to "The Names marked in green are the original titans" or "The Names marked in green are the first generation of titans" or something along those lines. For the key to be true at this point many others would have the be marked in green such as Atlas, Eos, Helios, Epimetheus, and Prometheus to name a few for they are part of the second generation of titans [1] 154.5.63.180 (talk) 09:27, 27 July 2012 (UTC)

Yes check.svg Done --Hidden Secret (talk) 14:37, 27 July 2012 (UTC)

change needed[edit]

Hello. I'm aware that I am don't have a major in this, but Persephone isn't connected t Hades at all, when she is his wife. By force, but his wife nonetheless, because that is why we have seasons. Please correct it? Thanks! — Preceding unsigned comment added by 164.76.196.168 (talk) 04:35, 6 December 2012 (UTC)

Formatting issues[edit]

1) It's completely unclear what the dots mean.

2) It's too wide and should be reformatted such that it doesn't overflow the page width (I estimate it's about twice as wide now as it should be) and related groups of gods should appear together.

I just see one troubling thing. Under the name "Chaos" is written "Void". Yet, in modern philosophy, the Void is considered as the father of Chaos. For Chaos doesn't comprise the Matter/Anti-Matter fluctuations. So the void is the father of all things, Chaos to begin with, then time and matter. Did the ancient Greek ignore that ? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 109.134.79.101 (talk) 15:17, 3 April 2013 (UTC)

Metis[edit]

shouldn't Metis be considered Athena's mother? Then, why is she not in the family tree? Though Athena came out of Zeus' head, but it was because Metis had already bear the child before Zeus ate her. So she should be found in the family tree. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 218.186.42.71 (talk) 04:43, 1 May 2013 (UTC)

Error[edit]

It's not the daughter of Atlas, but the Oceanid or Titaness who's called Aphrodite's mother. SamEV (talk) 07:16, 18 July 2013 (UTC)

Isn't that what footnote #2 is trying to say? What do you think ought to be changed in the article? -- Michael Bednarek (talk) 08:45, 18 July 2013 (UTC)
No, the footnote's about something else. SamEV (talk) 23:21, 18 July 2013 (UTC)
I noticed it's Epimetheus who's her father in this tree, not Atlas. I was used to seeing her described as a daughter of Atlas (Epimetheus's brother) at Wikipedia. I haven't pinned down the ancient source that would support the tree on her being Epimetheus's daughter, either. SamEV (talk) 07:04, 28 July 2013 (UTC)

Added gods/goddesses[edit]

Posiden is married to Amphitrite-see http://www.theoi.com/Pontios/Amphitrite.html Also, Echidna (child of Gaia and Uranus) is married to Typhon (child of Gaia and Tartarus) 80.42.220.141 (talk) 18:41, 13 November 2013 (UTC)

Not done: please make your request in a "change X to Y" format. — TheJJJunk (say hello) 23:29, 13 November 2013 (UTC)

Add Gods[edit]

Posidon has a wife-Amphitrite see theoi & they had a son, Triton see theoi Wugge (talk) 17:35, 19 November 2013 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 1 February 2014: Family tree of the Greek gods[edit]

Dear Wikipedia Contributors,

Please make it like before. i.e. delete the lines covering the names of the gods and delete the colours of the boxes. it is inconvenient to read like that. Thank you.

Sincerely,

--1.64.21.146 (talk) 06:56, 1 February 2014 (UTC)

I think the gender coding introduced by User:Lurlock is quite useful and I don't see any lines covering the names. -- Michael Bednarek (talk) 11:54, 1 February 2014 (UTC)
I haven't got any lines covering names either - I'm using IE11 with Vector skin - User:1.64.21.146 what browser/device are you using? Arjayay (talk) 16:18, 1 February 2014 (UTC)
The only thing I did that might have affected the lines was changing the width of the Titans' borders (because they were previously distinguished by color, which doesn't work with the gender-colors.) There shouldn't be any lines across the names unless it's a browser-rendering issue. I tested it in Firefox and Chrome before committing, and if it works in IE as well, that covers most people. Is there a browser which doesn't render this properly? Lurlock (talk) 19:21, 2 February 2014 (UTC)
Not done: please establish a consensus for this alteration before using the {{edit semi-protected}} template. — {{U|Technical 13}} (tec) 19:09, 15 February 2014 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 22 December 2014[edit]

Add Archive Geneology Please

TyEvSkyo (talk) 21:36, 22 December 2014 (UTC)

Red information icon with gradient background.svg Not done: as you have not requested a specific change.
If you want to suggest a change, please request this in the form "Please replace XXX with YYY" or "Please add ZZZ between PPP and QQQ".
Please also cite reliable sources to back up your request, without which no information should be added to, or changed in, any article. - Arjayay (talk) 12:23, 23 December 2014 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 22 March 2015[edit]

Can I add a part on pronounciation? Gorigoat (talk) 09:53, 22 March 2015 (UTC)

Red question icon with gradient background.svg Not done: it's not clear what changes you want to be made. Please mention the specific changes in a "change X to Y" format. --I am k6ka Talk to me! See what I have done 11:57, 22 March 2015 (UTC)