Talk:Femur

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Fractured femur is alleged to cause death[edit]

  • "If a traction splint is applied right away, a femur fracture is 20% fatal. Without a traction splint, it's 80% fatal." Is there a reference available to support this claim? --Daveb 13:05, 31 July 2005 (UTC)
    • Erh??? By what mechanism does a fractured femur cause death???? Anthony Appleyard 06:17, 24hospital statistics, however, is “in-hospital mortality”—death during the initial admission for the fracture. We analysed inpatient statistics that had been linked to death registration data in the former Oxford NHS health region (population 2.5 million) from 1994 to 1998." This appears to argue the other way. Just thought it may be of help! BMJ.com --Shanx 14:01, 29 October 2005 (UTC)

Couldn't a person bleed to death if the femoral artery is severed?Lpimlott (talk) 22:13, 22 March 2009 (UTC)

Not sure yet about that Esther kyabangi (talk) 13:47, 30 August 2016 (UTC)

Mechanical strength of a human femur?[edit]

How much would my femur stretch on the moon, ie what is the elasticity of the femur, and is it true it can support presures of one ton. (Unsigned comment by 150.237.47.4, Nov 13)

able to withstand over 550 pounds of force[edit]

I have removed this objectionable description of the femur: "able to withstand over 550 pounds of force." It is uncited, and not specific enough. From what angle? For how long? In what kind of person? Without more detail, it's just more lies, damn lies, and statistics. ~ Booya Bazooka 08:18, 26 May 2006 (UTC)

Redirects?[edit]

I'm all for redirect tags, but do we really need to redirect to FEMA and FIMA from this? Do people really get these confused?

Agreed, and removed. I find it hard to believe that someone looking for FEMA could possible end up at Femur. Spelling is not really similar, and they're not even homophones. ~ Booya Bazooka 00:54, 25 July 2006 (UTC)
Well, they are homophones in some dialects (in my Australian dialect, both FEMA and femur are pronounced /ˈfiːmə/) ralmin (talk) 06:59, 15 August 2008 (UTC)

Human only?[edit]

The article implies that a femur only exists in humans, but is the name in a lot more animals. Should this be added? I am fairly knew here in wikipedia and do not know the way these type of issues are handled.

Antegrade and retrograde[edit]

The section on fractures included this statement:

"With modern medical procedures, such as the insertion of rods and screws by way of surgery (known as Antegrade [through the shoulder] or Retrograde [through the elbow] femoral rodding) those suffering from femur fractures can now generally expect to make a full recovery, though one that generally takes 3 to 6 months due to the bone's size."

Through the shoulder or elbow? That's obviously not right. It looks like somebody did a copy and paste from a discussion of ulna fractures, and forgot to update the terminology so that it would apply to a leg bone. I've changed "shoulder" to "hip" and "elbow" to "knee". I hope the result is correct, but I am not an orthopedist, so I can't be sure that it is. Pat Berry 05:16, 20 November 2006 (UTC)

digital X-ray imaging[edit]

Hi, I'm a B.Sc Physiology and paramedic-- I recently fractured my left Femur, and obtained very high quality digital images of X-rays taken before during and after surgery, where a rod and two screws were inserted into my femur. The imagery is very good, and I thought this might be a good contribution to wikipedia... perhaps someone could direct me to the right place where I could add to the appropriate article? I would expect there to be some place where an article or part of one would contain this information... let me know: purpleidea@gmail.com thanks purpleidea (talk) 01:40, 9 January 2008 (UTC)

Is Femur one of the two strongest bones?[edit]

In the "human anatomy" section, the first sentence says that the Tibia is the strongest bone in the human body. However, it says in the next sentence that the Femur is one of the two strongest bones, along with a portion of the skull. Maybe somebody who knows can determine which is correct and fix the article? — Preceding unsigned comment added by Rbwxyz (talkcontribs) 14:34, 13 February 2011 (UTC)

" the femur is the longest and largest bone but not the strongest one as the strongest bone is the tibia. Along with the temporal bone of the skull, it is one of the two strongest bones in the body" yeah I could understand if they meant they were the 3 strongest bones. Dictabeard (talk) 02:23, 16 February 2011 (UTC)

Different angles near the proximal end[edit]

I was reading this book on strength training anatomy and there was an explanation on how differently shaped femur heads in the hip joint influence the amount of abduction. Basically if it was a sharp angle then impingement against the greater trochanter occurs early during abduction so I think it would only be possible with external rotation or flexion prior to continuing the abduction to avoid the impingement. Less dramatic angles seem to allow more basic abduction until impingement occurs. I will try to see if there are references about stuff like this, but it is difficult to search for. Is anyone else familiar with this? I'm trying to figure out ways to mention this important human variation and how it affects hip mobility here. AwesomeCoffee (talk) 20:33, 3 July 2011 (UTC)

File:Femoral bone - patellar surface.JPG Nominated for speedy Deletion[edit]

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File:Femoral bone - head.JPG Nominated for speedy Deletion[edit]

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What should I do?

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This notification is provided by a Bot --CommonsNotificationBot (talk) 15:20, 28 October 2011 (UTC)

Strong lede[edit]

The femur as "strong" as "steel"??? As it stands that is a meaningless statement. Strong how? By weight? volume? Shape? What kind of steel? etc. And depending on the answer, so what? I don't say that the intended remark is without interest, but as it was worded it was worthless at best. I removed it pending the arrival of an encyclopedic statement and citation. I also watered down the remark about "strongest bone in body" to such vacuity as to leave it practically meaningless. Unless someone can provide a useful elaboration, either in a section, or better yet, in a linked article on bone strength, that remark had better go too. Strongest? what kind of strength? Work of fracture? Impact resistance? Then there is the remark about the "largest" bone; Length? Thickness? Volume? Mass (dry, wet? full? empty? Etc?)? And then there is the question of whether to combine the human femur discussion with that of the grasshopper or kangaroo femur. Could someone please do some delousing? I am no anatomist, or I would. As things stand, it might be better if I let someone else have a look-in before trying. JonRichfield (talk) 09:43, 27 March 2012 (UTC)

Just compare the length of your femur and the other bones in your body. You will see that the femur is normally longer. But regarding the strength, weight and other aspects about the femur I agreed with you. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 124.13.34.41 (talk) 11:14, 15 April 2012 (UTC)

Nomination for "C-class"[edit]

Hi. Would people agree that this article now meets the standard to be upgraded from a "start"- to a "C"-article? I have no idea if there is an official way to nominate for a "C" (I only know there is for higher classes). If there is; could somebody nominate it, if the agree, or tell me how to do it. For more information about article classes, see Wikipedia:Version 1.0 Editorial Team/Assessment. --JakobSteenberg (talk) 12:16, 17 December 2012 (UTC)

There is no official process for C-class grading though not all projects use that class so you will have to check that the projects are using it before changing the rating. Keith D (talk) 23:19, 5 January 2013 (UTC)
They both use the C-class. The question is more if the quality is adequate. I wrote a lot of the information about human anatomy, so it would seem wrong in a sense if I just changed it without throwing it out for debate before. --JakobSteenberg (talk) 00:15, 6 January 2013 (UTC)